Masters and salary

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by veg_guy, May 15, 2005.

  1. veg_guy

    veg_guy Rookie

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    May 15, 2005

    I'm not sure where to post this so I thought I'd give this forum a try. I am considering going back to school to get my elementary education credential. I just want to get a credential, not a Masters in Education or Teaching. I already have two Master's degrees (one in psychology, one in public policy).

    So here's my question: I know that many school districts pay a higher salary to teachers with a masters degree. Does it have to be a Master's in Education or Teaching or does any Master's degree work? In other words, would I be eligible for the higher salary based on one of my other Masters?

    If anyone has any thoughts on this, please let me know.

    Thanks,

    Ed
     
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  3. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    May 15, 2005

    As far as I know, most districts look for a Masters in education or in a subject area that you would be teaching. I know that it Massachusetts, teachers need to go back to get their Masters within five years of receiving their bachelors and initial license and there are approved graduate programs that you can go through. It may be different in different states, but I know that it was frowned upon when I took psychology as a second major, so I dont think a masters in it would raise my salary in my state.
     
  4. sdhudgins

    sdhudgins Comrade

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    May 15, 2005

    In AR all you have to do is hold a masters it doesn't matter what it is in.
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    May 15, 2005

    Im in MA too and it makes a big difference in pay.For example a teacher with bachelors who is just starting out makes 35-40 thousand.But a teacher with their masters and 60 credit hours can make 70 thousand. Beth2004 what part of Ma do you live in?
     
  6. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    I'm in Southeastern Mass.
     
  7. veg_guy

    veg_guy Rookie

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    May 16, 2005

    Thanks for the responses. It sounds like the answer differs depending on where you live (which I guess isn't surprising).

    The requirements in MA sound pretty harsh but at least the pay is halfway decent. I'm in CA (the Bay Area) where the salaries are a joke, especially given the cost of living. One county out here pays a starting salary between $33-37,000 depending on educational level.
     
  8. litlmama

    litlmama Comrade

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    May 16, 2005

    In CA it's just a Mater's for the bump in salary. Good luck in the Bay Area. I'm in Redding and can barely afford to live!!
     
  9. Prissypants

    Prissypants Companion

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    May 17, 2005

    In Ky every teacher is required to get their Masters degree. You have to show credible progress within 5 years (15 hours) and have it completed within 10 years. I think because everyone is required to have it, it doesn't make a huge difference in salary. Most teachers here go on to get their Rank I, an additional 30 hours, because that's what really gives you the bigger pay raise over time.
     
  10. wolfster

    wolfster Rookie

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    May 17, 2005

    I was hoping to tag on a question to this post.

    I am new to teaching and currently interviewing (don't have certification, but other degrees and experience). My question is - in other states - is there a jump for a PhD or not much (I was told a starting salary of low 40s near a major metropolis/private school, and I have taught at the college and uni level).

    If no one has this info - my next question is - what can one do to increase the salary over the years (besides working other jobs in the summer?) For example, do private schools value teaching certification? Particular types of experience?

    Just curious. Thanks
     
  11. veg_guy

    veg_guy Rookie

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    May 17, 2005

    Wow, another state that requires a Masters for teaching! Amazing...

    Wolfster: In answer to your question, from what I've seen at public schools (and some private) there's not a bump in pay for a Ph.D. per se. Instead, you're given additional pay for the number of credits you've taken past the Masters degree. (up to about 30-40). This could amount to an additional $2-5,000. As far as other ways to increase your pay, it really depends on where you live. For example, some States (like TX) pay extra for bilingual (i.e., Spanish speaking) teachers. Other areas pay extra if you're National Board Certified, which is a fairly rigorous process that you can only undertake after you've taught for about three years minimum.

    As far as private schools are concerned, it seems like an increasing number of them are only hiring certified teachers. Or at least that's what they put in their job announcements.
     
  12. wolfster

    wolfster Rookie

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    May 17, 2005

    Thanks for the info veg guy

    I'm not worried about the certification. I am getting interviews and I will already know in a day or so if I'm hired. (I was just curious if one gets paid more if they get this).

    However - you mentioned that one could acquire extra pay if they were 'National Board Certified'. What does this mean exactly? (Please don't say this is another degree). Additional school? A test? How does one get this get this? Also, you mentioned that one could not even apply for this until after teaching for three years minimum - does it have to be teaching at the K through 12 level? Or would teaching at the higher level count too?

    Thanks.
     
  13. veg_guy

    veg_guy Rookie

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    May 17, 2005

    I'm not sure that I'm the best person to explain National Board Certification. It's not a degree. But you do have to go through an evaluation process and put together a bunch of materials. Here's a link to their website: http://www.nbpts.org/

    I would doubt that teaching at a level other than K-12 would count for the three years but it's just a guess. I'm also not sure that private schools would pay extra for this. SOME public school districts do but many don't.
     

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