Master of Education degree?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by futureteacher13, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2014

    Hi. I am considering getting a Master's degree after about 4 or more years of teaching experience. I am currently focusing on receiving my teacher certificate in Elementary Education K-6. My BA is in Social Science with a concentration in education. I have been working as a teacher assistant in PE for the past 5 years. I know it's going to be a challenge but I am wanting to do this in order to be an effective teacher for my future students. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! :)
     
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  3. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

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    Dec 14, 2014

    I have a Master's of Elementary & Special Education, but I got my teaching certification that way, so it didn't necessarily help me be a *more effective* teacher.

    Honestly, I'm of the belief that actual classroom experience is the most effective way to learn to teach. Maybe some seminars and books, as well. Responsive Classroom and Love & Logic are great classroom management programs. I don't recall learning much in all my education classes that was truly useful in day-to-day teaching.

    Master's programs are best for increased pay and broader job opportunities. You have to weigh that against the stress of going through grad school (especially with a teaching job... ick) and the student loans you'll rack up.
     
  4. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Dec 16, 2014

    I have my MA in Education w/ emphasis in Special Ed. I wouldn't necessarily say it helped me be a better teacher either. I've since switched gears to SLP (Speech-Language Pathology).
     
  5. heyitssteph

    heyitssteph Rookie

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    Dec 17, 2014

    I am in the process of getting my MAT in Elementary Education (K-8 in my case since I will have a middle school endorsement.) Honestly I agree with the poster who said you learn the most in the classroom. In my program we do have to do things like interview teachers and write our own lesson plans, so that is helpful.

    If you have a specific school district in mind I would maybe try to find out whether or not they prefer to hire candidates who have a Master's Degree or not.
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Dec 17, 2014

    I would have to agree. My district won't even allow principals to interview teachers with a master's degree, because they're too expensive. Some districts in my area don't even compensate teachers for having a master's.
     
  7. heyitssteph

    heyitssteph Rookie

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    Dec 17, 2014

    Wow, may I ask where you live?!
     
  8. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Dec 18, 2014

    Wisconsin. (Thanks, Scott Walker! ;) )
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2014

    OP, see if you will be compensated for the extra education, your plan to work towards your masters after spending several years in the classroom is excellent. In most districts in NJ, schools offer some form of tuition reimbursement as a benefit, so that is something to consider. Additionally, there is a lot to be said for doing the master's a course or two at a time. You can easily take 9 hours a year, which means you are able to incorporate what you are learning long before the masters is completed. Best of luck.
     
  10. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

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    Jan 2, 2015

    Thank You!

    I appreciate all of your feedback! I know I will learn much more by being in the classroom and gaining the experience. I am currently a Physical Education Paraprofessional with middle school students and have been for the last 5 years. It has given me so much experience as far as learning how to manage a classroom and discipline. I will take what I have learned and appkg that into the classroom as a teacher. What matters to me us that I provide a safe and positive environment for my students to be the best they can be, to learn, and to take risks academically! :)
     
  11. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Jan 2, 2015


    Your district must pay a lot for a master's. Around here, most don't even bat an eye. A new or newish teacher with a master's is still usually less than half as expensive as the veteran retirees. My former principal hired me and then realized I had a master's...:lol:He didn't care at all either way.

    Unfortunately, I'm nearly positive tuition reimbursement is a NJ phenomenon. You seem to have a lot more $$ for schools over there. (Though I do agree about your other point - incorporating as you go!)

    OP, I think getting a master's after teaching awhile is a great idea. You'll likely get more out of it if you have some experience going in. I did my master's before teaching, and I don't regret that either. I'll be getting more additional education after teaching, anyway. And your current experience will DEFINITELY help. Before teaching, I worked for several years in after school programs. That was invaluable experience because I was in charge of my own class each afternoon. The management experience - not just discipline but being able to run things and deal with all the little issues that come up - was key. :thumb:
     

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