Marla Issac's Story - Hiring Controversy

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by NewTeacher2016, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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  3. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    She applied to the school that she was currently working in. She knows the students and the culture. She has a PhD in the field and is certified, and they didn’t even call her for an interview. It’s a slap in the face.
     
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  4. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    There are many people who are overqualified for jobs in many fields. They don't get interviews. If they know that because of the salary they would be required to pay her they wouldn't not hire her, why bother interviewing her?
     
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  5. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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  6. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    There is a review of hers on-line blaming the school for not informing her that getting a PhD in biology if not wanting to be a professor or doing research is useless due to a flooded market of biology PhDs. She complains that career services wasn't much of a help. While it may be true that the market is flooded, a PhD in Biology can be used in many different applications from policy, communications, and consulting to name a few.
     
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  7. txbelle

    txbelle Rookie

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    I don't know how districts pay. Does the school district have to pay that much or can they interview her and say "you would be a great asset but the district can only afford ($$$$), would you be willing to accept the job still?". I've heard of some places where you can negotiate the salary, are schools allowed to do that? Just curious.
     
  8. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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  9. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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  10. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    My understanding is districts have to interview current employees who work in the district that apply, but they are not obligated to hire. This is the case in my home state and every job my mom has applied for within her district she was at least offered an interview. If that’s the situation here, she may have a case.
     
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  11. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I’ve never heard of that being a law or other mandated regulation. It’s often a district policy or a common courtesy given by an administrator, but I don’t think she (or anyone) has any legal standing to argue that she has to be given an interview simply because she was a current employee.
     
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  12. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    Jun 27, 2018

    While it's not unheard of to hire a brand new teacher with a Ph.D, it is very rare. If it was a hard to fill spot, like Physics or Math, then possibly, but if there are other qualified candidates who cost less, then most districts are going to choose the less costly person. Just because she has a Ph.D. does not mean she will automatically be a good teacher--yes she has experience as a para and as a substitute, but we don't know who else was in her interview pool. This would be a non-issue is she was white--it's only coming up because she is black--and while diversity is important--picking the best candidate is what makes the difference--and we don't know the whole story.
     
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