Marking Text/Close Reading

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Peregrin5, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 19, 2016

    So I'm interested in literary strategies right now for a couple of reasons. First, I have to present a "Marking the Text" AVID strategy to the rest of the staff because I was roped into it, and because I want students to do some textual analysis of Claim-Evidence-Reasoning write-ups so they can learn how to write their own.

    I've used the AVID strategy but I feel it's somewhat lacking. I've also used other strategies that were largely just made up by me, but I didn't feel that they were particularly effective. The AVID strategy has students number paragraphs, circle keywords/concepts, and underline claims. The numbering is useful for referencing during discussions. Another thing is what do we do with it afterwards? I still don't have a great grasp on Socratic Seminars, and I'm not sure what else would be good to do...

    Anyway, I'm looking to beef this up somehow and I'm sure there are a lot of different marking the text strategies out there on this forum. How do you have students work with the text that you've found worked particularly well.
     
  2.  
  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2,292
    Likes Received:
    123

    Dec 19, 2016

    Have you had your students write a rhetorical précis using their annotations? I like it because students are forced to paraphrase--no "lifting" from the original. They find it quite challenging.
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 19, 2016

    I completely forgot what the word précis meant until you posted it. LOL! I forgot it even existed. I think I last heard it used in college. That's a good idea though.
     
  5. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    75

    Dec 20, 2016

    Here are a few that I have used and really like:

    C. circle any unfamiliar words
    A. Authors main idea or point- Underline it
    T. Talk with the article- write questions or comments in margins
    C. compare and discuss with your neighbor any areas of confusion or thoughts about article
    H. Highlight any supporting details or evidence to support authors claim

    For analyzing arguments or Opinion Pieces
    O. Find the authors Opinion
    R. Underline or highlight reasons he/she feel that way
    E. Underline supporting evidence given
    O. Write YOUR Opinion

    S. speaker
    O. occasion
    A. author
    P. purpose
    S. Subject
    Tone

    UTILIZE THE MARGINS OF AN ARTICLE
    You might have to teach kids what the margins are. You would be surprised how many don't know. Have them write in right margin at the top of article the word SAYING at the top of the Left Margin write the word DOING. As they read the article have them stop every paragraph or two and in the right margin write what the article is specifically saying. Write in the margin a 1 sentence summary of that paragraph. In the left article what is this paragraph doing to the reader? Is it trying to convince? Is it summarizing or clarifying? In left margin paragraph by paragraph have them write what its doing and if they agree or disagree.

    In bottom margin have them write a quick 3 sentence summary about what they read.

    This one is good if you have low readers who need help analyzing or understanding a piece.
    Hope this helps

     
  6. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    75

    Dec 20, 2016

    For Socratic Seminars there are a lot of good ways to ease into them. They can be intimidating starting out for all parties involved. Here are some I have done and liked.

    4 coroners Agree/Disagree/Strongly Agree/Strongly Disagree
    Have these words printed and put on the wall. (1 per wall)
    Pose the question and then allow students to move to the wall that best represents their thinking.
    Once they get there, collectively as a group they must discuss together to put together their argument and then elect 1 speaker to discuss or share their ideas. Each wall has 2mins to share and then there is a 3min rebuttal period where kids are allowed to respond to others. WE ATTACK THE IDEAS NEVER THE PERSON SHARING.

    Speed Dating:

    This one works just like the title sounds. Students are partnered up (A's and B's or 1's and 2's whatever works really) Each partner is given a role as either speaker or listener. If they are the listener they are required to sit and listen without talking to the speaker. A Question is posed and the speaker has 1 min to discuss and share ideas with their partner. Then they switch roles. Its good because it forces kids to think and to actually practice listening. Its also good when you have shy or timid speakers who do better in smaller groups.

    Utilize POST IT Notes:
    I have seen Socratic seminars done in a number of ways. Using post-its is good for making sure everyone has a chance to talk. Once the question is posed they write their response on a post it. When they read their post it and share it with the class their time to talk is done. Another way to do this is to post the questions on the board or around the room. Give kids a post it. Tell them to write responses on the post it WITHOUT their name on it. Then read post-its allowed and allow kids who want to volunteer an opportunity to discuss publicly.
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 20, 2016

    Love this! Thank you so much!
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 20, 2016

    Thanks for those tips on Socratic Seminars. They definitely are intimidating. I've been finding it hard to find ways to get it started. I struggle with room space and organizing my very large classes in order to do it. And I know about the outer-inner fishbowl method for large classes. It simply wouldn't work in my classroom unless we moved all of desks out into the hallway, which I'm not willing to do (because I'd have to be the one moving them in and out, lol). I've instead been opting for more smaller group discussion strategies as opposed to whole-class discussions.

    I've just learned how to effectively use "consensus" in small groups which has been working wonders. It's very simple, everyone has to come to an agreement about the same answer and all write down the same answer. It gets everyone either agreeing or debating about each question and leads to great discussions. I do get those who just agree without actually listening, so I'm working out some kinks in the method (maybe using sentence starters or pre-writing their own thoughts), there but I'm very happy with the results I have been getting.

    Just so I can do some further research, where did you get these and the marking text strategies from? Is there a website somewhere that might have more resources like this?
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435

    Dec 20, 2016

    Just google close reading or annotating text. Tons of websites and pdfs have information on this.

    You can have students analyze nonfiction for thinigs like
    1. contrasts and contradictions
    2. Data
    3. How the article in structured.
     
    Peregrin5 likes this.
  10. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    75

    Dec 20, 2016

    Just so I can do some further research, where did you get these and the marking text strategies from? Is there a website somewhere that might have more resources like this?[/QUOTE]

    I wish I could say that I was smart enough to have thought these up....sadly these are things that I saw others using. I learned them from Edcamps and observing other teachers. Check out:

    http://www.readwritethink.org/professional-development/strategy-guides/socratic-seminars-30600.html

    https://www.facinghistory.org/resource-library/teaching-strategies/socratic-seminar

    https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/bring-socratic-seminars-to-the-classroom

    https://www.paideia.org/about-paideia/socratic-seminar/
     
    Peregrin5 likes this.
  11. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Dec 20, 2016

    Do you use the rest of the AVID strategy or just the first step of marking? There is then the 6 interactions in the other column. I also really like the Before and After summary portion as well.
     
  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 21, 2016

    My AVID book doesn't have the 6 interactions you mention. It has a bunch of AVID strategies for my subject (mostly graphic organizers and interactive notebook stuff) and I could see some of them working together with marking the text, but nothing is explicitly laid out for what to do next.
     
  13. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Dec 21, 2016

    Ah, then you have the intro book, not the full Critical Reading text. I was in a similar boat where I just didn't see much point if it was just marking the text. Adding the interactions and writing pieces (which is the rest of the process) made it much more useful.

    Essentially the 6 pieces are the ways students interact with the text in the margin by writing questions, summarizing, connecting information to experience, visualizing and two other ones I never remember.
     
    Peregrin5 likes this.
  14. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 21, 2016

    I'll have to look into that. Do you have any links or pdfs that outline that? I think one our teachers has the whole book somewhere, I'll ask to borrow it.
     
  15. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Dec 21, 2016

    I checked online, I couldn't find the full PDF. It's called Critical Reading.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 21, 2016

  17. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    2,985
    Likes Received:
    435
  18. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Dec 23, 2016

    ^ Yep, that one. Chapter 7 in particular.
     
  19. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 28, 2016

    Thanks guys!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 143 (members: 0, guests: 129, robots: 14)
test