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Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Ted, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Aug 3, 2013

    Hello all and happy first weekend of August (wish I could tell you it's June, but oh well... ;) )!

    I was wondering how much (if at all) do you enforce manners in your classroom? Or do you feel that's a family issue and should only be taught at home?

    Do you expect your students to say, "Please", "Thank you", and "You're welcome"?

    Do you expect your students to say "Yes" instead of "Yeah" and "No" instead of "Nuh-uh"?

    Do you expect your kids to take off their caps when they enter a room?

    Do you expect them to interrupt politely with "Excuse me"?
     
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  3. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Aug 3, 2013

    Many of my kids are expected to use manners everywhere they go.

    Some have only been taught manners at school, so I think it is a disservice to these kids if I do not expect them to use common courtesies. Those skills are just as necessary to get a job later as the math I'm teaching them.
     
  4. Sm2teach

    Sm2teach Companion

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    Aug 3, 2013

    We teach manners school wide. We use a modified Essential 55. We also teach Cafeteria Etiquette. The whole school meets in the gym, (student's go here in the mornings instead of our classrooms), and our P will do a lesson on this. We introduce 1 or 2 a week.
     
  5. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 3, 2013

    We work on manners a lot in the ED room. :)

    I expect my students to say "Please, thank you, Excuse me".

    They are required by the school to take off their hats when they enter the building.

    I expect a "yes Ma'am" when I tell them to do something, rather than an argument.

    We also work on "Righting our wrongs" when they 'mess up'.
     
  6. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I expect the basics: Please, Thank you, You're welcome, Excuse me.

    I've tried: Yes sir, No sir...and that usually works okay. To be honest, I'm surprised I haven't had parents complain that I'm implementing that one. :)

    I remember one time when we were having a party, my students were taking a cookie from a platter a mom was holding. As they walked by, they would thank her for the cookie. She finally told them: "You all don't have to thank me." I replied, "No... they really do."

    I've found that when students use good manners with each other, the respect level in the room goes up. It's hard to get in a fight over a lost pencil when that person just thanked you five minutes ago for holding the door open for her when she entered the room. :)
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 3, 2013

    Yes.

    These all tie in with our class/school rules about respect.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Aug 3, 2013

    Absolutely. Although I don't mind "yeahs" and the like...I don't think it's rude in casual conversation.
     
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I work at a private school, and Yes, Ma'ams and No Ma'ams (or Sirs) are expected. I don't accept Huh?, What? Yeah, or Nope as answers.

    "Huh?" has always been my pet peeve.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I do teach manners. The most important part of life are people and not things. How we treat each other is what is most important. I model manners as well as teach them.

    I don't go as far as some might. I can understand "sir", but I would much rather students use my name, Mr. ______ then call me sir.

    The hardest one that I have with students over the years is with greetings. If someone says good morning to them (mostly other teachers, but also myself) they sometimes say nothing instead of saying "good morning" as has been modeled and taught to them. While this gets a bit better throughout the year, I have never figured out why this is the one takes the longest to implement.
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I agree! I taught the 55 Essential Rules and greetings in general were difficult. You know what I think it may be, in my experience anyway? I'm not sure if many students are used to people being outright polite to them. They may be taught to respect their elders, but having an elder initiate a happy, "Good morning!" takes them off guard and makes them awkward for a long while.
     
  12. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Re: Greetings.

    I hear you! I tell my students from Day One. I am not an Information Booth where you can just come and start speaking.

    They soon learn that I expect:
    "Good morning, Mr. M."
    "Good morning, Sarah."
    "How are you today?"
    "I'm fine, Sarah...how are you?"
    "Good. Thank you for asking. I have a note here from my mom and..."

    It's common courtesy that seems to be rarest these days. :)
     
  13. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I am soooooo using that line this year!!!!

    I absolutely work on manners in room. It's like a PP mentioned, lots of times kids don't get that at home. My partner teacher and I are doing some of the Essential 55. DH and I work really hard with our little boy and manners - he's really good at please, thank you, excuse me, and you're welcome. We're working on no ma'am, sir, etc. His preschool teacher told my mom that he has the best manners she's even seen. :wub:

    Beth
     
  14. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Aug 3, 2013

    This is the hardest one for preschoolers. I most have to work on the parents not automatically responding and letting themselves be interrupted and letting themselves be poked or hit for attention!

    I try to be the first line of defense - train them correctly so they know how to treat teachers and classmates with respect when they get to the "big" school.
     
  15. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I explicitly teach manners. Many times, my second graders would come to me without a basic understanding of what's acceptable/unacceptable (as far as good manners are concerned).

    After the first few months of school, it's neat to hear/see them say, "Excuse me" if they're reaching over someone's space or to hear them say, "Thank you" when I hand them something.

    One thing I don't teach is "Yes sir/no ma'am." Not my style.
     
  16. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Aug 3, 2013

    Basic manners are definitely taught at my school. Please, thank you, good morning, etc. It's not mandated or anything, but it's the norm. I enforce it, but not sir/ma'am or saying things like "yeah" instead of yes. I think some of that is regional, and maybe we're more casual in CA. I find that modeling respectful communication with students earns me much more respectful treatment than some of the other paras that treat the students more casually (I don't blame them, they're not all planning on becoming teachers and it's just a part time job to some).

    The school where I volunteered this year really doesn't teach much as far as manners. There are so many other issues and behaviors to deal with most of the time, I think they just fall low on the list of priorities. I do make sure the students address me as Ms. Bison (except with actual name) rather than "Umm" and they politely ask when they need something or I won't respond. I'm not their teacher, so I don't make a huge deal out of it.
     
  17. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 3, 2013

    I also insist on manners. Please, Thank you, May I, Excuse me, Yes ma'am, No ma'am, etc., are required, along with appropriate volumes and tones of voice. If I am in the cafeteria, I tell my students that I do not want to see, hear, or smell the food in their mouths, lol. (Table manners are a pet peeve of mine - there's even a phobia for it.) We will work a lot on Appropriate and Accountable Talk in our classroom this year.
     
  18. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    Aug 4, 2013

    My entire school has an excellent standard for students. We expect our students to say thank you a lot--when leaving library each week, for example. The majority of teachers have the students write thank you letters or make some sort of significant display to for boss day, nurse day etc. This is one of my favorite things about our school culture. Personally, I think having gratitude is the key to happiness.
     
  19. Matt633

    Matt633 Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2013

    This is why I love this place! I haven't been on this forum for awhile but in just a few minutes I have gotten new ideas and reminded of things I need to do.

    I teach manners, etiquette and writing wrongs but did not emphasize greeting etiquette. It really does make a difference. Thanks Ted!
     
  20. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Aug 4, 2013

    I feel like manners should be taught at home and reinforced at school.

    I stress -

    1. Saying "please" and "thank you"

    2. Using "may I" versus "can I" when you want to use something

    3. Saying "good morning" or a form of greeting when you enter the room

    4. Holding the door for the person behind you

    5. Helping others

    6. Stopping the line in front of openings (like the hall) so people can get through

    7. Not talking over the teacher or other students

    8. Apologizing when you hurt someone's feelings or do something wrong

    9. When someone calls your name, saying, "Yes?" not "huh" or "what?"

    10. We don't say, "gimme" "shut up" or "you're not my friend"

    Some years, I'll have a hand full of students that say "Yes ma'am" to me and I compliment them on it, but it feels so formal, so it's not a requirement.

    True story: My third year teaching I was sitting at my desk writing something when a student came up and said,

    "Excuse Ms. Catz, I don't mean to bother you, but is it okay if I borrow some of your crayons?" :wub:

    You could've knocked me over with a feather! I was so impressed with his manners, he was student of the day and I called home.
     
  21. MzMooreTeaches

    MzMooreTeaches Cohort

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    Aug 4, 2013

    Coming from a Montessori environment we were really big on manners and being polite. Now that I'm moving over to a traditional setting I will continue to incorporate many of my Montessori practices in the classroom.

    1. Answering "yes" instead of "what."
    2. Interrupting politely is major in kindergarten, so I show them how to stand and wait patiently.
    3. Excuse me and all the regulars please and thank you are essential.
    4. I'm also big on eye contact. I like for my students to look their speaker in the eye during conversation, or greeting politely.
    5. It was a school wide rule that hats are removed when they enter the building.

    I think manners are needed and I agree with a previous poster that the overall tone and environment in the classroom is a lot more relaxed and respectful.
     
  22. Mrs.Giggles

    Mrs.Giggles Companion

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    Aug 4, 2013

    I will most definitely be incorporating manners into the daily running of my classroom. Manners go a very long way, and it's important for my students to learn those values at a very young age.

    I will also be making a conscious effort to ALWAYS use manners when I'm talking to my students as students learn best through modeling. "Please" and "thank you" will heard on a daily basis in my classroom.
     

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