Managing disruptive behavior

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Moonshine123, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Moonshine123

    Moonshine123 Rookie

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    Oct 10, 2019

    Hi everyone,

    I was wanting some advice on how to manage disruptive behavior in my class. I have a student who is very disruptive, talks back in fact yells back at the teacher and other adults. Does not listen to any other adult other than the teachers. I've tried small group, one-on-one, and even positive reinforcement like points. Mind you he is only in 2nd grade. Talked to the parents but that is not helping either. Does anyone have any strategies they've used in a similar situation that worked. thanks.
     
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  3. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Oct 10, 2019

    I have two VERY disruptive students. I put them on tier and have them on a reward system. I will tell them two times to get to work or to follow directions and if I have to say it again, they do not get a point. If they get five points they get a small reward. If you do it consistently, it does work. It is just very exhausting repeating yourself and reward students who are annoying. Good luck!!
     
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  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 10, 2019

    Often the biggest thing for these students is consistency. Whichever strategy you choose, stick with it. It might not seem to work at first but give it some time. This strategy sounds simple and easy to implement.
     
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  5. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Oct 10, 2019

    What are the circumstances when this usually happens? Also, is he popular with classmates?
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Oct 11, 2019

    I've heard from several in the know that it may often get worse before it gets better.

    So, while don't hold onto a strategy that clearly isn't working, be aware that change does take time.
     
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  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Oct 11, 2019

    Does this mean that aides and para's are disregarded? I have worked with students of varied ages that tend to pick one authority figure, the one who is really calling the shots, and treats all others with disdain, correctly assuming that they don't hold all ultimate power. These students are, in fact, monopolizing the teacher's time in a kind of strangle hold. Not saying that is this kid, just curious about what adults he isn't listening to.

    I have to ask if this child has been seen by the CST? There may not be anything they can do, but it can't hurt to get him on their radar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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  8. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    Oct 11, 2019

    There are some different things to try: Sometimes being in really close proximity stops disruptions before they happen. Never engage w/ an arguer. I turn my back when dealing w/ kids w/ that attitude after telling them something simple.
    Give a look or maybe even a really stern, but quiet voice ( 1 word command). It helps w/ some like that. Sometimes it sends some of them off the deep end too depending on the kid. You never know until you try it. :) Try to figure out what he wants...attention...control...I had 1 like that last yr who consequences were not allowed to be given to for several reasons. I feel for you!
     

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