Male teachers = bar lowered?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Feb 1, 2024.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Feb 1, 2024

    I had an interesting conversation with my grade-level teammates. They said they feel like male teachers aren't held to the same standard as female teachers. Does anyone else feel that the bar is lowered for male teachers?
    Personally, I feel like I work as hard (if not harder) than some of my colleagues. The conversation was started because they were talking about a teacher in another grade-level who doesn't do much and the students complain about him (his laziness and lack of caring is no secret and the teacher even jokes about it himself).
    Any thoughts?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Feb 2, 2024

    There is a gendered way of how some teachers are seen, to a certain extent. Where a male colleague of mine is seen as "like a football coach" because of his energy, my similar temperment is described as "motherly". That being said, I would hope that expectations for both of us are similar.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I am a male teacher. I don't think that the bar is lowered in grades K-5.
    That hasn't been my experience. I do find that you are under the limelight a lot as a male teacher as there are so few of us. If a female teacher is "lazy", female teachers aren't because the other 50 in the school are not. If a male teacher is "lazy" then male teachers at the school are called lazy because there are only 2 or 3 of us. I do think you come across some administrators who are sexist, and I wish that wasn't so. This is 2024 and people should be wise enough to realize the success of a teacher is not based on their gender, but their decisions.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    @readingrules12, after all these years, I had no idea you are a male! Your post was very well stated! I agree with all of it.
     
  6. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Cohort

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    Feb 3, 2024

    In my experience, the bar is lowered only in certain non-academic aspects. There are lower expectations for classroom decor, for example, and with older students, a nurturing personality. Academics and general professional conduct have been the same standards for my schools.
    I agree with rr about representative bias. As a minority in other ways, I've experienced that type of biased thinking.

    The other place I've seen different standards is in extra duties. I've seen the extra "stuff" that goes into school community culture delegated consistently to the women before the men. I'm talking planning PBIS rewards, recognition ceremonies for students, planning assemblies, field days, lunch bunch book clubs, Grandparents' Day, that kind of stuff.
     
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  7. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    Feb 7, 2024

    I agree with the classroom decor example. I'm a guy and don't really worry about what my classroom look like. My math teaching colleague (female) repainted her walls, covered up her filing cabinets, keeps everything pretty tidy.... On the other hand, I might not sweep my floor for a week! The females in the building do certainly perform a vast majority of the organizing stuff and decorations.
     

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