Making every voice heard??

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by lmjcatz, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. lmjcatz

    lmjcatz Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 11, 2006

    Hello! I have some ideas/questions regarding class discussions and wanted some input from you experienced teachers-I'm a first year teacher:) .
    Although there will be things that I definitely want to discuss in regard to short stories/novels, etc., I want to be able to work out a fair way for the students to be able to have some choice in discussion topics. I was thinking of telling them ahead of time to write down one or two things they want to discuss on a slip of paper-they would have time to think out what they feel is important/puzzling/interesting,etc.- the next class I could randomly draw out the topics (I would give them fair warning that I reserve the right to modify the "topic" as needed-if it is too general or something). I am hoping this is a good way to address the questions of all the students, especially for the ones that need to think a little before speaking-they will have had time to think about their questions at least. Has anyone done this, and does it work? My second question is about timing topics-would it be advisable, in some cases, to put a limit on the amount of time we would discuss a certain topic before moving on to the next one-say five minutes per topic? I realize that some topics will require more time, but I guess I'm trying to figure out a way to make every voice heard-and my periods are only 48 minutes!
    If anyone has used these strategies, or has another strategy that works well, I would love to hear about it.
    BTW-I teach 9th and 10th grade English.
    Thanks!!
     
  2.  
  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Aug 11, 2006

    I think it is quite reasonable to set time limits. Writing down the topics sounds good, too, as long as the discussions are pretty immediate. I think any discussions that the kids themselves initiate are valid. I'm going to try and stay away from leading them to my own interpretations and just trust that their insights are valid. Why not have them discuss in small groups?
     
  4. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    597
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2006

    I've taken classes where at the end of the day, people write responses or questions to what they learned. Then the teacher collects them, and addresses them the next day. I have never done it with schoolage kids, though.
     
  5. lmjcatz

    lmjcatz Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2006

    I'll definitely have them do small group discussions, but I would like to do some whole class discussions also-hmm, actually it might be interesting to have them work in small groups first,to get the ideas flowing, then they can come together as a class and share what they've been discussing within their groups-that way everyone can benefit from everyone else's insights, but everyone will also have had a chance to discuss what was important to them. I guess I will try various discussion strategies, and then use the ones that work the best with each class. Thanks, Upsadaisy!!
     
  6. lmjcatz

    lmjcatz Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2006


    That's a good idea, too-I think it would work with high schoolers.
    As a recent college grad (adult student), I have sat through so many classes where we never moved beyond one discussion topic and I sometimes felt like the class period had been wasted-I don't want my students bored or upset because we had to move on to the next story or novel and they didn't have the opportunity to express their opinions or have their questions addressed:)
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Aug 12, 2006

    You're welcome, lmjcatz. Even with the small class I have (8 kids this year), it works better to break up first. The groups can pick a spokesperson. And it makes it easier to see who is participating in small groups.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Pi-R-Squared,
  2. SharedAccountWith3
Total: 219 (members: 4, guests: 199, robots: 16)
test