Making career change to TEACHER!

Discussion in 'New Teachers Archives' started by henge, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. henge

    henge Guest

    Oct 5, 2004

    I am in the process of changing careers - I have been working in the corporate world as an accounting professional for the past four years and proir to that worked in customer service, inventory control, medical records, etc. I am finally making the move I have always truly wanted and that is to be a social studies teacher! I am having trouble trying to put together a resume as I have virtually no teaching experience, yet the DOE has approved me for certification (I have a BA in History) and the School District has cleared me for interview. I have 3 children and three step-children whom I have taught immeasureable amounts of history, yet how do you include that type of experience on a professional resume? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.
     
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  3. Jeri Dawn M

    Jeri Dawn M Rookie

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    Oct 5, 2004

    Perhaps a portfolio with teaching experiences or ideas. Upon graduating we presented our interviewers with a sort of portfolio with our belief systems, ideas, goals, etc. It needs to be simple enough to look through quickly, but complex enough to say that you would make an awesome teacher. Be confident.
     
  4. Mozart

    Mozart New Member

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    Oct 18, 2004

    I'm doing the same thing in Oklahoma

    I'm doing the same thing in Oklahoma except I've been in Business for 20 years. I've started putting together a portfolio also. The teaching experiences that I've included are:
    Teaching Junior achievement once per week to 9th graders.
    Teaching High School girls sunday school classes.
    Teaching music at church to 1 - 6 graders.
    Teaching classes at my work.
    Teaching classes at our local higher education center.

    None of these are official teaching jobs - but it is enough to let administrators know that I've been in a classroom, prepared a lesson plan, and handled behavior problems.
     
  5. taz25bad

    taz25bad Guest

    Oct 18, 2004

    i would use the experience as volunteer experience on a resume.
     
  6. elizabeth3

    elizabeth3 New Member

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    Nov 10, 2004

    New Career

    I am also getting ready to change my career from Accounting to Special Education teacher. I am very excited as I am ready for a change. My degree is in Psychology and with the State of South Carolina, you can apply to a program if you have a bachelors degree and teach in an area in which your degree is in. I qualify for the Special Education area. I am preparing for the Praxis II exam and I have a study guide which is great, prepares you for the essay and multiple choice areas, however I am wondering if there is another study guide that I can purchase that will help me more in the Special Education area. I will be taking the test in March 2005. You can never be too prepared!! Any suggestions/comments would be great....:)
     
  7. pruckelshaus

    pruckelshaus Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2004

    I am almost ready to start my third career (I spent 9 years in the Navy and the last 10 years as a programmer) as a secondary English teacher. I will hopefully student teach starting on 2/14/2005. I have a BA in English, minor in history, and I am currently about 75% done an M.Ed. program. The thing that I have found to be most helpful is to find experienced teachers and talk to them. Luckily, the M.Ed. program that I'm in has about 60% experienced teachers going through the program, so I've picked up a lot. Honestly, I can't imagine teaching without taking any sort of education courses.

    As far as resumes go, think about what you did before that will apply as a teacher. Organization, leadership, problem solving, training, technology, you name it, and it can probably have a .edu angle. Next, you will want to work on putting together a solid portfolio; at this very moment, I am avoiding doing the last sample lesson plan for my portfolio, which happens to be due tomorrow evening for one of my classes. Now that my portfolio is more or less together, I have realized that it is a written encompassment of what I want to be and do as a teacher.

    Pete
     
  8. paulchurchfield

    paulchurchfield New Member

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    Jan 12, 2005

    Career change to teacher.

    I've been working as a software engineer, doing product development for the past 13 years and I am strongly contemplating considering teaching.
    I have a BS in conputer engineering.
    Do positions exist in K-12 schools for computer engineering a teacher?
    What supplemental education would I need to get?
    My expertise is in analyzing and developing software for a variety of applications in several computer languages. I have mentored many people over the course of my career and I am very well received as a teacher, in that regard.
    If I could find a position where my skills could be used, I think that it would be a very gratifying career move for me. I realize that I would be lucky to make half the money that I do now but that is a small price to pay for peace of mind.
    This corporate scene is not for me.
    I really need to make a change.
    Feedback would really be appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  9. pruckelshaus

    pruckelshaus Rookie

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    Jan 12, 2005

    As you probably read in my post, I'm in close to the same boat.

    PA has a Business/Information/Computer Technology certification, I would assume that NY has something similar. I would look at that as your first certification goal. Find a good school that offers an M.Ed. program with Certification (rather than Master's with thesis) and also offers you the flexibility that you need. Chances are that you won't need much in the way of computer technology classes (though that depends upon the school and certifying state), but you will definitely need classes focusing on pedagogy.

    I would also consider a Master's in Instructional Technology, which would allow you to focus on development and implementation of technology in a learning environment, either instead of or in addition to an M.Ed. If it's instead of, you probably won't get certification out of it, but there is growing demand for educational technologists. I'm going to pursue the M.I.T. as a follow-on program that will enchance my abilities as a teacher and will eventually take me to technology management in a public school environment.

    I congratulate you on your choice. There are too many programmers out there that just assume that they will still be able to find jobs when they are 50, and I just don't feel that will be the case. Education is a meaningful and rewarding follow-on to the crap we in the technology industry put up with today...

    Pete
     
  10. Dinsdale

    Dinsdale New Member

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    Jan 20, 2005

    I'm in the same boat. I've been working in my field - theatre/art - for many years, and am now looking at the opportunity to move into teaching. But I'm nervous about going from "doing" to "teaching." This would be at the H.S. freshman level. I can't remember what I was being taught at that age (it was a loooonnnngg time ago...). Where can I go to refresh my memory? Thanks for any advice anyone can offer!
     

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