Maintaining Maturity?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Peregrin5, May 23, 2014.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    May 23, 2014

    I have 8th graders, and progressively through the year they always seem to start becoming more and more immature.

    For these last few projects we're doing, I've told them, that I need to see that they are mature enough to handle working with the tools and materials in our classroom which could be dangerous if they aren't being careful. So if they're showing that they cannot be mature with the materials, they'll have to sit out the activity.

    That's worked for the most part, but I don't think that this could work for something earlier on in the year like notes, and other daily classwork.

    They start off mature acting, though it could be the honeymoon period, and the fact that they're now top dogs as 8th graders, but it degrades over the year.

    They're just starting to act too silly and goofy for my tastes and I fear it could lead to dangerous situations or make it look like I don't have control. It's mostly boys by the way. I feel it would be too harsh to make a rule that states "You must be mature," and give consequences to those who are acting immature. Also I observed a 7th grade class earlier and those students seemed a lot more mature than my 8th grade boys.

    How do you maintain maturity in the classroom?
     
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  3. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    May 23, 2014

    I started using what I called "Scholar Levels" for the purposes you're describing. My kids often handle old artifacts that I bring in and if they can't be mature (scholarly is the word I use) then they drop a level. It isn't a punishment necessarily and has no grade impact - it just prevents them from handling the materials.

    As far as the general regression over the year, when I notice it happening I line that class up outside before I let them in the door and calmly yet clearly remind them that inside my door is a classroom, that it is my classroom, that I have expectations, etc. Often they just need to be recentered and reminded that even if they are watching Frozen in 3 of their other classes at this point in the year, I value their future too much to let them waste time learning nothing in my room.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    May 23, 2014

    What if you make a list of specific behaviors that you deem immature, go over them, explain if you must and strictly enforce them.
    For example 'no running in the classroom', 'keep your hands to yourself', 'no play-fighting', etc (by the way, these are some of the immature behaviors a few of my students are exhibiting.). Then enforce it the same way as if they were disrespectful or whatever else you don't allow in your classroom.
     
  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    May 23, 2014

    I like using scholarly in the classroom instead of mature. I like the idea of revoking lab privileges if they can't maintain maturity too, but I'm not a fan of having to track every student's Scholar Level every day.

    I would like something that is easier and more natural for me to implement. I've tried implementing a loss of lab consequence for certain things. Maybe I need to clearly define what kinds of behavior will result in Loss of Lab.
     
  6. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    May 24, 2014

    95% of my students never dropped from the highest level. There was no daily tracking needed.
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    May 25, 2014

    I think you just need basic rules that are generic enough to cover everything.

    Be prompt.
    Be prepared.
    Be respectful.
    Be responsible.

    If a kid is acting immature or silly or play fighting - that's not respectful to you or the class, and it isn't responsible if you have equipment out in the room. Follow up with a consequence for breaking the rule.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    May 25, 2014

    Hm. I like the "Be Reponsible" part. I will add that to my rules next year.
     
  9. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    May 25, 2014

    "Silly and goofy" are types of disruptions which are not in the big category - defiance, profanity, assault etc. Kids know this.

    Consider the smaller the disruption the larger the intervention or consequence. This turns typical discipline upside down. If a kid makes a silly remark no matter how small that is the time to implement your management plan like Limit Setting.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    May 25, 2014

    The thing is the time and place though. If they are being goofy during direct instruction or independent study I will enact a consequence. This is more like silliness during group work or lab work where students are allowed to talk and be a little chatty. I think you're rift though that I need to set those clear limits even for group work.
     

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