Magruders, ugh!!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by jessi.lewis, May 5, 2010.

  1. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 5, 2010

    I can't find a thread dedicated to Government; am I just missing it?

    One of the classes I teach is Senior government. After being on the phone with Magruder's for hours, the only thing I can ascertain is that they have NO supplemental material to the textbook. (Aside from the "Teacher Resource CD" which is helpful about .07% of the time). Is this the case? No powerpoints, premade tests with answer keys, section quizzes, political cartoons or anything?!

    Also, do most government teachers use Magruders? For being the #1 government book in the US, I must say that I am thoroughly unimpressed...

    Thanks for any help -- sorry for the borderline rant! : )
     
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  3. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    May 5, 2010

    I teach government, but use a different text. We use Prentice Halls "Civics: Government & Economics in Action". However, the book is designed for grades 7-10, so would likely be too easy for seniors.

    That said, I just went to the website for your book's publisher (also Prentice Hall ...www.phschool.com). They DO have many of the resources you mentioned for the Magruder book. There is an ExamView test generator which will have tests and answers within it. There is also a student DVD available, and a few other things they noted.
     
  4. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 5, 2010

    Thanks for your reply -- I have the exam view software, which is actually terrible because the questions it selects are insultingly easy, and it repeats the same questions over and over. The DVD is equally poor, as it only has a few random handouts and worksheets on it. I was hoping there was another resource I was missing out on... like the manuals that typically come with a teacher's edition, for example.
     
  5. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    May 5, 2010

    Try teaching calculus or statistics. You're lucky to get a teacher's edition that includes answers that are actually correct.....much less a resources packet.

    I ran a clicker session in Algebra II last year based on the resource book's ACT prep test. I didn't check their answers when I set it up. BIG mistake. Of 30 problems, the book had 5 that were correct and 10 that didn't even have a right answer in the choice set.

    The higher up the ladder you teach, the less resources you get. This said, Juniors and Seniors are a lot less difficult to handle so it works out.
     
  6. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    May 16, 2010

    I hate to say this, but if you are teaching the class you do not need an answer key for tests. I can look at any one of my assesments and know the answer instantly.
     
  7. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    May 16, 2010

    Most impressive and you teach algebra 1 as well!!!!!


    Please take one look at one of my my lowest level Algebra 1 problems and know the answer instantly.....



    An investment account earns 6% interest compounded monthly. How much will an initial investment of $6,000 be worth 5 years, 10years, and 30 years? Round your answer to the nearest penny.


    Your pick for the next problem that you can solve INSTANTLY in your head. Should we talk solutions to 3 dimensional systems of equations or simplifying numbers with fractions for exponents?
     
  8. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    May 16, 2010

    Sorry Muttling, I meant for History m/c questions not for Math.
     
  9. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    May 16, 2010

    The manuals for high school government textbooks aren't very good. Your best bet is to search the internet for alternative resources. Fortunately, there are a ton of lesson plans and civics education websites such as the Center for Civic Education and ourcourts.org.
     
  10. jessi.lewis

    jessi.lewis Rookie

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    May 18, 2010

    Ok, that is some useful information; thank you! Any other good suggestions for resources?
     
  11. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

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    May 18, 2010

    ...the U.S. Constitution.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    May 18, 2010

    What do you mean by resources? Like sources for readings? Ideas for projects or activities? You have to keep in mind that you cannot just simply use something you find on the internet. You MUST modify it to fit your class. Canned projects and activities, without some sort of modification, frankly, suck.
     
  13. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

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    May 18, 2010

    I'm inclined to agree that the resources for most, if not all, textbooks are not that helpful in social studies. I will admit that I use the political cartoons that come with my textbook, as well as some primary source readings. However, I make up my own questions to go along with them.

    I'm not sure what level of class you're teaching, but I can certainly say that government is best learned when it's discussed and researched. When I taught it, I had my students constantly flipping through the Constitution--that's how I organized my course. On top of class discussion, I held debates frequently and did a lot of webquests. If your students don't have regular access to the Internet, consider printing resources for them to analyze on something. For instance, I'd have them read an article from the Constitution, then research its impact on the U.S. But I'd also give them a packet containing different views on that Article. Sometimes, of course, this was hard to pull off as there wasn't always that much avaliable to choose from.

    Government is an extremely important and, I think, fun class. With that said, I'd probably lean from relying on the textbook for more than homework. Like most history classes, the best method for learning is projects and research. But, I don't want to give you the wrong idea, I do consider the textbook as research to a degree.

    Again, I'm not aware of your dept.'s policies or the level of the class you're teaching, but projects always worked best for me when teaching government.
     

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