LS kids need severe multiplcation help

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by blondierox4u, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. blondierox4u

    blondierox4u Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2006

    I teach Learning support which is pretty much a mixture of Learning disabilities and emotional disabilities. I teach Math and there are about 5 different Math groups I teach and I would say I have about 6 kids who struggle with multiplcation facts. They are 6-7th graders working on 4-5th grade math levels. I give them practice everyday usually 1st 15 minutes of class, we do flash cards, I have them write them and they are still havign a hard time with the higher numbers like 6-7-8- 9 they know bc of the hand trick but I'm trying to work on division with them and the understand the concept but get the wrong answer bc they don't know their facts. I am a 1st yr teacher with not a lot of resources, can anyone give me any good ideas, websites, books etc?? to help speed up this learning process.
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I tutor lots of middle schoolers who still haven't mastered multiplication. For most, it is a memory problem, not a concept problem. The only thing you can do is drill, drill, drill. Play war with number cards. Use 100s boards sometimes. I usually drill without number cards and use repetition like this: I say, '6x7 =?', kid answers, I repeat, '6x7 = 42, what is 6x7?' Kid answers. Then I add another troublesome fact. 7x8 = ?, kid answers, I respond. Then I switch back and forth between the two facts for a while, finally adding in a third troublesome fact. Then repeat the process.
     
  4. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Show the kids that multiplecation is adding the same number a certain number of times. you also maight get books that help you line up the numbers for two and three digit mulitplecation. also give them shortcuts that help them remeber for example multiples of nine add up to nine. Good luck. Terry G.
     
  5. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Students each have a white board. You say a fact and write it on your white board for the students to see. They write and answer and hold it up for you to see, if it is the correct answer you say, "Erase" if it is wrong say "Try again"

    ***White boards are great and expensive. Go to the lumber yard buy a sheet of smooth white paneling. ---called white tile board…. Our lumber yard cut it up in smaller sizes free. (about 11 by 12 inches) don't remember for sure. Or maybe your high school shop teacher will cut it for you. Next with sand paper sand around the edges just enough to take off the sharp edge. A boys top of a sock ---makes a good eraser. You need a white board, a white board marking pen and sock top for each student.
     
  6. bronaghjordan

    bronaghjordan Rookie

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    I had the same problem. at the start of the year I was despairing of ever teaching tables but after a few months of constant drill and fun games 5 out of the 14 kids i teach could do 157 tables in less than 10 minutes. unfortunately u just have to keep drilling. Get a kitchen timer and at the start of each lesson give them a sheet of tables and a certain amount of time. set the timer and they have to see how many they can get done in the time. no one compares results but the next day they have to try to beat their own score. a great game is where you put all the multiplication facts on flashcards. divide the kids into two teams and the flashcards into two piles. line each team up behind one of the piles. on your signal the first child in each line takes the first card. if they know the table they call out the answer run to the end of the line and the next child goes. if they don't know the answer they can put that card to the bottom of the pile and keep going through the pile until they find one they can answer. my kids love it and it really helps with memory. the first team to get to the bottom of their pile wins. if u have some really weak students you could have them add the two numbers instead of multiply and you can sort the teams fairly so generally its really motivating for them and fun! GOOD LUCK!
     
  7. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    TouchMath has an excellent multiplication section.
     
  8. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    You can do the school house rocks songs, some of them are a little outdated but they go through the math facts.... there is even a movie I believe of them, but I am sure you can get the audio on Limewire or Itunes.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    http://www.jumptutoring.org - this is John Mighton's Web site devoted to helping kids discover they're better at math than they think they are.

    http://www.mathraps.com - this is the Web site of the Rappin' Mathematician, who's a middle school teacher in San Diego.
     
  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Warning...unpopular response coming.
    Some of my LD students will never learn their multiplication facts, no matter how much we drill, practice, sing songs, make up chants, etc. They may "get it" this week, then have totally lost it by next--that is the nature of their Learning Disability. Instead of spending countless hours and creating frustration, and developing a severe dislike of math, I am focussing on helping them to develop the strategies that work best for them which will enable them to do the math they will need to do for the rest of their lives. Many of my kids are great problem-solvers and excel in many areas of mathematics--multiplication tables just isn't one of those things.
     
  11. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    That is a very common-sense approach, MrsC. Are the kids integrated into general ed classes for math? That's the only problem I can see - other kids thinking they should have the same leeway. Problem solving skills are the best kind of math skills to have.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    MrsC, I think you might quite like John Mighton's approach; see also his book The Myth of Ability (chances are pretty good that your local big bookstore has a copy in among the education books). And I agree with 'daisy: problem-solving skills are much more interesting than ability to memorize.
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    TeacherGroupie--have some of the JumpMath books, and John Mighton's approach has worked with some of my kids, not all however. I am fighting the sometimes losing battle of working with students who "hate" math because they have been made to feel inadequate and stupid because of their inability to memorize--I've become very protective! Most of my students have their full math program with me (or, if they are working in their homeroom classes, they are doing work that I have provided), so the issue of what the others are doing or thinking is pretty much non-existent. My mantra, however, is that "fair does not mean equal", so just someone does something one way doesn't mean that that is right for everyone.
     
  14. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Fair definitely doesn't mean identical. If you've got kids who beef about the LS kids getting special accommodation, and one of the kids wears glasses, try asking the kid with glasses to loan the glasses to a kid who doesn't normally wear them, and then ask both kids to do math (either on paper, if they're reading glasses, or on the board, if glasses for distance). Then sweetly ask everyone if the kids should be treated equally.

    By the way, I fight similar battles with people who hate math (or science, or history, or writing, or what you will) for the same reason. They're grownups, but that doesn't make the damage any less heartbreaking.
     
  15. CarolinaSPEDNY

    CarolinaSPEDNY New Member

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    Jan 18, 2007

    Visual cues work wonders!

    Write up the problem and the answer on the board have them look up the answer on the board do this for a week. Multiplication is basic memorization. Give them that visual cue they are bound to remember it. Good luck!
     

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