Looking to possibly go into Sp.Ed.

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by jackzdoll, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. jackzdoll

    jackzdoll Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2007

    Hi All,

    I am looking to switch careers- ok, having been a stay-at-home mom for 6 years, i'm looking for a career (i have a background in theater design but would rather chew my own foot off than do that again). a friend of mine who has a son (toddler) with Down's Syndrome was telling me how difficult it is to find a center to watch him because of Down's. Which got me thinking.

    I had been considering some sort of a career with Special Needs consideration, based upon past encounters I have had with people with disabilites,etc. i began considering a day care center that focused on children with Special Needs, and incorporate Special Education (sort of like a KinderCare kind of place).

    My questions are- what sort of credentials/training did you need to teach Special Ed? what sort of difficulties did you encounter when you began teaching? is this type of center something that would actually be a good idea? i mean, are there too many concerns (legal, health, DCFS) that would make it more of a hassle than a benefit to people in the area?

    I have been pushing this around for a few months now but am clueless on how to begin so I would appreciate any feedback you have regarding this.

    Thanx!
     
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  3. Parapro

    Parapro New Member

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    Sep 20, 2007

    I would just caution to be prepared for lots and lots of paperwork and depending on the area, being overwhelmed by your class size.

    That said, the rewards are many if it is something you enjoy doing.
     
  4. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2007

    Sounds exciting! :)

    Some of the details you are asking about--logistics, etc--vary state by state, even county by county to some extent. You might want to look up Early Intervention services in your area, and contact them for that kind of details. Both University of Illinois and Illinois State have strong EI programs, I don't know where you are in proximity to either of those, but their programs would be able to point you in the right direction for info, also.
     
  5. AZSpedtchr

    AZSpedtchr Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2007

    I have 2 education degrees. My undergrad is in Elem Ed, and I got my master's in Sp Ed after I struggled to find a general ed position. Many states offer emergency (temporary) certification if you're interested in teaching Sp Ed, but although that's a faster way to find a job, I would caution that having the education/training before you get into Sp Ed is, of course, invaluable.
    Sp Ed is rewarding, frustrating, exhausting, fun, and NEVER boring!!!:2up:
     
  6. FutureDR

    FutureDR New Member

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    Oct 8, 2007

    Special Ed is the most rewarding thing I have ever done. This year I teach 15 moderate kids across 3 grade levels. It's fun, it's a challenge and I hate the paperwork. HOWEVER, especially in urban areas, these kids are at the greatest risk which makes overcoming their individual challenges hold the greatest rewards. When you see a kid who has been struggling to read for years suddenly read because of the work that everyone has done... well, there is just no words for it...
     

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