Looking for work anywhere East of the Mississippi

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by cousinjimmy, Apr 3, 2013.

  1. cousinjimmy

    cousinjimmy New Member

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Hi all,

    Sorry if this has already been posted, but I've been through seven pages of threads and didn't see it.

    My wife graduates with a music education degree this spring and we don't have anything tying us down to Pennsylvania anymore. I can do what I do wherever so it doesn't matter where I live.

    Is there anywhere east of the Mississippi where they are hiring a lot of teachers? My wife is dual certified in Music and English.

    Thanks,

    CJ
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Generally speaking, there is a lot more competition east of the Mississippi River. (Not that ALL areas west of the Mississippi River are hiring, just that almost all areas east are already over saturated.)
    Last I knew, Northern Virginia would probably be your best bet. Rural areas of North Carolina are not too hard to get into. In general, the southern states are typically easier to break into (not that they are easy).
    To give you a specific example- the last opening at my school received 120 applications. I am currently trying to get back to Michigan, where the applicants per position are usually 1,000 or more, with really desirable districts receiving several thousand applications.
     
  4. Miss84

    Miss84 Comrade

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Try the DC area! DC area has the highest teacher salaries in the region, with many options; DC public/charter schools-and surrounding counties; Prince George's/Montgomery Counties in MD, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, and Prince William Counties in VA. The traffic is satanic/the cost of living is ridiculous-but the salaries even out for the most part.
     
  5. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    I would start out by allocating at least several thousand dollars for licensing fees. I would also purchase several stuffed animals that you can punch, kick, or tear apart when you see each state's individual idiotic licensing requirement. (For example, New York, who will require you to use THEIR fingerprint card and pay 4.5 times the actual FBI fee to get a police clearance. Or Massachusettes, who will require you to travel to Massachusetts to take THEIR subject matter test even if you've already passed the Praxis.)

    I would estimate at least $250-300 average per state. And be prepated to take a lot of virtually identical tests.
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Or you can roll with the punches, cousinjimmy: it'll be easier on your blood pressure and better for your relationships with those around you.
     
  7. ravinraven

    ravinraven Companion

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    Apr 3, 2013

    I'm tied down to Ohio (and it's terrible job market), but if I wasn't I'd be looking at Virginia (where I went to graduate school), North Carolina, and South Carolina. They seem to be hiring the most and who doesn't like the milder climate?
     
  8. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Apr 3, 2013

    I live in New York, am fingerprinted, took over 5 certification exams for various certifications, and I don't own any stuffed animals...nor am I punching anything to get certified.

    The only thing that is frustrating would be the complete lack of jobs anywhere on Long Island. Even so, I just work harder. Getting certified was the easy part.

    Generally speaking, east of the Mississipi tends to be more difficult, from what I understand.
     
  9. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    Apr 3, 2013

    If it were just a question of getting certified in one state - any state - I wouldn't be complaining.

    Nor would I have an issue if there were consistency among the state requirements.

    However, anyone looking for a job in multiple states (which was the subject of this thread) will find a variety of nonsensical requirements. For example, Pennsylvania does not require a police certificate to get a license, but does require a health certificate. The District of Columbia does not require a health certificate, but requires you to obtain your own fingerprint cards and send them to the FBI for a police certificate. New York does not require a health certificate, but requires you to use their fingerprint cards and pay them a (highly marked-up) fee to get the FBI certificate. Oh, by the way, the health certificate must come from a physician licensed in the USA, so if you happen to not have health insurance that will cover you in the USA, we've just added another cost.

    By the way, adding to the category of nonsensical requirements, Pennsylvania requires non-citizens to file a declaration of intention to become a citizen. Unless you are a foreign language teacher. At least that doesn't cost anything.

    While I'm on a roll... most states require that, if you graduated from a foreign university, that you have a "foreign transcript evaluation" by a company certified to do these things (typical cost $150ish, PLUS additional fees for each copy sent). However, not all states certify the same firms, so you may have to have it done multiple times. However, New York does not require it, rather they require original copies of your transcripts (another cost). Blissfully, I have not yet seen a state require both the foreign transcript evaluation AND original copies of transcripts - which, remember, their official position is that they are unfit to interpret. But I'm sure I will come across one before long.
     
  10. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Or you can do just like I did and apply to any schools in any areas you are interested in without obtaining a license first. Some schools will grant you an interview without one as long as you have a license in another state. If not, then they might send you a link telling you that you have to apply for a license in said state before you even make it past HR. Worst case scenario is that they don't respond at all. That saves a lot of money.
     
  11. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    Apr 3, 2013

    Most interviews require original copies of your transcripts. At least, in my experience they have. As far as marked up prices go...welcome to NY. This is one of the most expensive states in the country.

    While you are complaining, there is someone who sucked it up, paid, and jumped through hoops to apply to a job that your wife may want - yesterday.
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 4, 2013

    :thumb:
     
  13. nyteacher29

    nyteacher29 Comrade

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    Apr 4, 2013

    cousin jimmy: ignore the negative feedback and hold onto the many helpful suggestions many have provided.....

    i do not know much about the south in terms of job market, but it seems that a lot of posters on here attend job fairs and have had success at them, is that something your wife can look into?

    msd59: wish there was a LOVE button. :p
     
  14. redtop

    redtop Companion

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    You assume that just because I am complaining that I'm not also proactive.

    My wife has license applications in various stages in Virginia, Maryland, District of Columbia, Georgia, New York, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts.

    The fact that we only see our mail every 3-6 weeks and can sometimes go months without being in the USA on a business day slows down the process somewhat.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 4, 2013

    :beatdeadhorse:
     
  16. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    I'll accept this smiley in place of the nonexistent love button, haha :wub:
     
  17. Storyteller

    Storyteller Rookie

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    Apr 6, 2013

    cousinjimmy - I live in SC and am applying to jobs here. Depending on the district, there can be upwards of 10-15 jobs in one subject area (sorry, I'm high school so not sure about elementary or ec jobs). I think the quantity of jobs here depends on which district you are applying to - some get higher amounts of applications while others get virtually none.

    Good luck! As someone else who is hunting for that all-elusive job, I wish you the best! Keep us posted on the hunt! (and don't let negative comments get you down...:)
     

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