looking for a poem

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by Margo, Sep 27, 2006.

  1. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Sep 27, 2006

    This is probably going to be a long shot but I thought I would give it a try. I am looking for the words to a poem that I had many, many years ago. I can't even really remember how it went but the topic was about all the things that a child learns when they are playing with different toys or in different play centers. It was something like... "To you, I am playing with blocks, but when I play with blocks I am learning how shapes go together...... etc, etc, etc." Those probably aren't even the right words but that is the gist of the whole piece. Does ANYONE have a clue what I am talking about? And if so, would you be able to post the whole thing or post a link if it is online somewhere? It is very important that I find it. They have taken away all our playtime in Kindergarten and we are working hard at trying to show all the reasons that play is so vital in the early years. Thanks for your help.
     
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  3. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Sep 27, 2006

    Here Ya Go...

    Just Playing

    When I'm building in the block room,

    Please don't say I'm "Just Playing."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play;

    About balance and shapes.

    When I'm getting all dressed up,

    Setting the table, caring for the babies,

    Don't get the idea I'm "Just Playing."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play;

    I may be a mother or a father someday.

    When you see me up to my elbows in paint,

    Or standing at an easel, or molding and shaping clay,

    Please don't let me hear you say, "He is Just Playing."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I'm expressing myself and being creative.

    I may be an artist or an inventor someday.

    When you see me sitting in a chair

    "Reading" to an imaginary audience,

    Please don't laugh and think I'm "Just Playing."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I may be a teacher someday.

    When you see me combing the bushes for bugs,

    Or packing my pockets with choice things I find,

    Don't pass it off as "Just Play."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I may be a scientist someday.

    When you see me engrossed in a puzzle,

    Or some 'plaything' at my school,

    Please don't feel the time is wasted in "Play."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I'm learning to solve problems and concentrate.

    I may be in business someday.

    When you see me cooking or tasting foods,

    Please don't think that because I enjoy it, it is "Just Play."

    I'm learning to follow directions and see differences.

    I may be a chef someday.

    When you see me learning to skip, hop, run, and move my body,

    Please don't say I'm "Just Playing."

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I'm learning how my body works.

    I may be a doctor, nurse or athlete someday.

    When you ask me what I've done at school today,

    And I say, "I Just Played."

    Please don't misunderstand me.

    For, you see, I'm learning as I play.

    I'm learning to enjoy and be successful in my work.

    I'm preparing for tomorrow.

    Today, I'm a child and my work is play.
     
  4. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Sep 28, 2006

    Thanks, Grammie. That's just the one I was looking for. Does anyone know of any others that support the theory of learning through play?
     
  5. MsMelissa06

    MsMelissa06 New Member

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    Sep 29, 2006

    This poem isnt as specific as the previous one, but it cute, short and simple.

    When you ask me what I've done at school today,
    And I say, "I just played,"
    Please don't misunderstand me.
    For you see, I'm learning as I play.
    I'm learning to enjoy and be successful in my work.
    I'm preparing for tomorrow.
    Today, I am a child and my work is play.

    ~Anita Wadley
     
  6. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Sep 29, 2006

    Thanks Melissa. Right now I can use all the help I can get. All the kindergarten teachers are rather upset that we can't have play centers or recess for our little guys and we are trying to get together research and other things to support the importance of play.
     
  7. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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  8. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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  9. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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  10. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Sep 29, 2006

    The Importance of Play
    By Kim Moore

    Q: My son's kindergarten teacher lets children play in the classroom. She says it is important to her curriculum, but I feel he might not be ready for first grade if he doesn't use class time to learn. She tells me not to worry and to watch for specific changes, but I still think he shouldn't be playing.

    A: There are many ways to learn. Children and adults learn best when they are motivated and interested. Children are very interested in the world around them, including those things we know they need to learn to prepare them for the tasks of reading and writing so they can learn through their lives.

    Play is an important part of learning for children who do not yet read or write proficiently. It allows them to practice skills and learn about new concepts by touching, feeling, listening, talking, and smelling. A blend of both academic work and play is essential for a kindergarten child to learn. In this blended environment, children learn to love school.

    Kindergartners are not physically ready to sit and listen to a day full of lectures, or practice letters or numbers for 30 minutes at a time. If required to do so at this age they will totally tune the teacher out. More importantly, they will learn to think of school as drudgery and a bore instead of a place to go to open doors to the world.

    Your child's teacher is very smart, and your son is very fortunate to be in her classroom. Support her efforts and your son's love of learning through a blend of play and academic work. You should also encourage the play to continue at home. Ask your child to tell you or show you how and what he played that day.
     
  11. souptunuts

    souptunuts Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2006

    I'm sorry - that sounds quite backward. Although I am just a sub right now I am going through my classes for certification and in our class on Wednesday, we discussed the role of play in preK - 1st grade. As you know, it is super important. I was curious as to if you all had anything in your state kinder standards that required play? Anyway, here is something that might help- a little research.

    Play and Learning
    It is through play that much of children's early learning is achieved. The physical, socio-emotional and intellectual development of children is dependent upon activity. Therefore, opportunity for play is a key aspect of the Kindergarten program.

    The effective kindergarten program builds on, rather than detracts from, this natural approach to learning. Through touching, manipulating, exploring and testing, children find out about the world around them. Through interacting with other children and adults, they find out about themselves and their relationship to others.

    Through play, children imitate adults and experiment with what it means to be a caregiver, a fisher, a firefighter, a doctor and so on. Through play, they learn how to solve problems and work cooperatively with others.

    Children engage in different types of play depending upon circumstances and particular needs. Types of play range from inactive observation to participation in group play requiring planning and cooperation. Kindergartens encourage several types of play. Associative play, occurs when children play with each other, sharing similar materials and activities in an unorganized way. Cooperative play requires organization for a purpose. In solitary play, children play alone and independently, following their own interest without reference to others. Children who watch other children playing, ask questions and make suggestions, but do not enter into the play are said to be engaging in onlooker play. Children who simply play beside each other with similar materials are engaged in parallel play.



    Spontaneous play in an activity-centred environment is characteristic of effective Kindergarten programs. After preparing a rich environment, the teacher has a role in extending play by observing the children, interacting with them, giving further information, adding or changing materials as appropriate and, in some instances, providing a sense of direction.


    According to Piaget, it is through play that children construct a sense of order and meaning out of their environment. They are constantly organizing and reorganizing new information and experiences. This process of altering previously established patterns of organization (schemas) is what Piaget calls learning. It is not the same kind of learning as simple recall of names or facts.
     
  12. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Oct 1, 2006

    Thank you, Grammy, for those wonderful web sites. I have them bookmarked to show administration when the time comes.

    Soup-- Thanks for the research. All the Kindergarten teachers know exactly how what we are doing goes against all principles of early learning. Unfortunately, we can't do anything about it. That is why I am looking for snippets of information/research that might help sway the powers that be. We'll see what happens.
     
  13. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Oct 1, 2006

    Margo, how do the parents feel about this? Maybe the parents could sway the powers that be more then anything if you can get them on your side.
     
  14. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Oct 1, 2006

    Surprisingly enough, parents haven't voiced any complaints to us. I think they just think this is how Kindergarten is becoming and they seem to accept it.
     
  15. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Oct 1, 2006

    That is just so sad. I think we will grow up with a generation of children who lack imagination and creativity. We are losing a valuable component of our society if that is the case.
     
  16. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Oct 1, 2006

    It is sad. Especially in a time when we are trying to teach kids how to be social individuals yet not giving them the chance to socialize with their peers. What will happen to these kids when faced with a conflict? They won't have had the proper instruction on how to deal with it. Is that when they will handle it with violence?
     

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