Longer books for Pre-k

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Nov 12, 2008.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2008

    I'm thinking about reading a longer (chapter) book to my four-year-old pre-k class. I would do maybe half a chapter per day and it would need to be a beginning chapter book with some pictures. I was thinking of reading either when we begin naptime (takes mine a while to fall asleep) or during afternoon snack. I did this when I student taught in kindergarten, and they loved it.

    Are kids this age too young for it? Should I wait until after Christmas to start? What books would you suggest?
     
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  3. tracer330

    tracer330 Rookie

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    Nov 12, 2008

    what about ramona the brave by beverly cleary; i would try it now and see how they respond; if they can't seem to handle it right now, try in again in a month or so; it might be a good idea to start reading longer books as nap time stories: read a chapter when they get onto their cots to help settle them down
     
  4. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2008

    Magic Tree House books would be good, also. Lots of action, short chapters with fun suspense at the end of each, 2 main characters - 1 boy, 1 girl.
    Hey. It sounds so good, I think I'll try it with my class. :)
     
  5. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Nov 12, 2008

    I remember when i was a floater inthe kindergarten room I read them James and the Giant Peach. OMG-- what a hoot! they loved it and there were times I had to stop and regain control of myslef because I was getting tongue tied and laughing so hard! I read one chapter a day. When we were finished I rented the video and we watched it one day and they all said it was good but it was funnier when I read it to them. It was a wonderful experience for all of us. Obviously that would be too much for your class but a simpler chapter book might be okay. It's worth the try, nothing to lose.
     
  6. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 12, 2008

    It may not be too much. Use times that are outside of sitting and just plain listening and you may be able to get even more time than people would think. Snacks, nap/quiet time, under a tree outside.

    We knock off Magic Tree houses in one day.
     
  7. mrgrinch09

    mrgrinch09 Comrade

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    Nov 13, 2008

    I would be more inclined to stick to the books aimed at their age group. There are thousands upon thousands of great books that are age appropriate for preschoolers.

    But, if you really want to try a longer book with your kids, then a collection of poetry might be the way to go. A Shel Silverstein or Jack Prelutsky book might work. You can read a few poems at a time until you get through the whole book.
     
  8. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Nov 13, 2008

    I think it's a great idea to help develop that listening comprehension. Horrible Harry is a good series, it's not heavy in the vocabulary and does have some pictures.
     
  9. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Nov 14, 2008

    I've done magic tree house before and it went over very well.
     
  10. amethysst

    amethysst Rookie

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    Nov 14, 2008

    It is worth a try. . . when my boys were 7 and 5 we read Huckleberry Finn . . . a little each night at bedtime and they loved it! You never know until you try. I often will read a book at naptime...and I dont show pictures the usual way....I read the words and then show the page....so it might work out just right....gives them something to listen to and settle down with. Let us know how it works out for you!
     
  11. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Nov 14, 2008

    Junie B. Jones is the best.

    I read several to my 4's then we saw the musical on stage. It was great.
     
  12. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Nov 14, 2008

    A few years back, I had an Aide who wanted to read chapter books to the class. She read a book from the Magic School House series. The class was engaged and loved it because they were reading "big books" like their siblings.

    I have 2 half-day programs- not a lot of time. So I use picture books in order to integrate math, literacy, and science.
     
  13. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Nov 14, 2008

    We have been reading from 3 Shel Silverstein poem books, but I have to pick and choose, because some of his humor is too complex for them.

    I think a longer book can be "age appropriate" if it holds their interest, and while I read one or two picture books a day, I really think they would get something out of a continuing story. JMO. :2cents:
     
  14. RedFox

    RedFox Rookie

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    Nov 15, 2008

    Last year I started The Magic Tree House books with my Pre-K class in the spring - they LOVED it and were really interested in it. It would not have worked for them earlier in the year, but by April or May they were ready.

    I thought I would start it earlier this year, and I may, but right now this group probably isn't ready for it. I don't doubt they will be ready by the spring, though. It's amazing the difference a few months can make, isn't it??
     
  15. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 15, 2008

    I agree, and if you look at oral storytelling eras-those stories were often very long and involved. The children used them to learn culture norms and other important things for their times. If they can use long stories I see our current trend toward only using age appropriate titles to the exclusion of other longer works self limiting. This also limits other areas as you stated, vocab and listening stamina being just a few.

    I hope however, that children aren't scolded to stay and listen or somehow taken into a land that isn't age appropriate. In our emergent and mixed age environment I have noticed that children are able to much deeper and more involved work when they are involved, when the material is offered in an integrated manner and when product isn't more important than process (or progress as my families say). :2cents::2cents:
     

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