Living in San Francisco/Bay Area on a new teacher's salary

Discussion in 'General Education' started by muxziem, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. muxziem

    muxziem Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 6, 2016

    Is it humanly possible to live in the Bay Area on a new teacher's salary? More importantly, is it worth it?
     
  2.  
  3. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,564
    Likes Received:
    743

    Apr 6, 2016

    It's possible. I moved here for my first year of teaching, and we made it work. I was living with my husband who was working retail at that point making $12/hr. We paid about 1/3 of our combined total income on rent. However -- and this is a huge difference -- this was in 2007, before the big housing bubble. With the way rents are now, I am not sure if it would be possible. I would start looking at housing now and take that into major consideration before making a decision.
     
  4. crazycatlady80

    crazycatlady80 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 6, 2016

    I never lived in the Bay Area on a teacher's salary, but I did go to college there. I also lived in NYC on an archivist's salary, which is actually worst than teachers. It is possible to live in expensive areas on a low salary. Just realize that you're going to be VERY limited. You probably will not live in the nicest neighborhood and won't have money to go out much, but it is possible.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,466
    Likes Received:
    1,493

    Apr 6, 2016

    I crunched the numbers a year ago when my BF and I were tossing around the idea of moving. Here's what I calculated (after researching several districts in many different areas of SF):
    1. I would actually make less than what I currently earn (we get paid really well here in the Central Valley).
    2. About 1/3 or so of my income would go toward rent (I would most definitely not be able to afford purchasing a home--even if we combined our incomes).
    3. I would never be able to afford driving what I current drive (Mercedes Benz) after paying all my bills!

    Personally, I'd much rather live very comfortably here in the Central Valley than move to SF and be strapped for cash. Plus, giving up my home and downsizing to a 1 bedroom/1 bath apartment would be completely depressing!
     
    otterpop and Linguist92021 like this.
  6. linswin23

    linswin23 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    101

    Apr 6, 2016

    I'm not from the Bay Area, but it is a DREAM of mine to live and work there eventually. I'm from SoCal and a few months ago my mom sent me an article about how San Francisco Unified School District (I think) is possibly giving teachers a housing stipend. This may be wrong or outdated information, but do a little digging around on the web and see what you find. :) Best of luck. It sucks that as teachers we make so little compared to other professionals. I won't go on that tangent. If it is your dream to live there....make it work! You are a teacher. You are a resourceful, educated citizen and you can make it work.
     
    PallasAthena likes this.
  7. muxziem

    muxziem Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 7, 2016

    Thanks, everyone.

    So I do not have my credential yet, but I will be going to school next fall. I am aiming to get a secondary ELA credential, which I understand may not be as in high demand as STEM credentials. Is there much of a need for ELA? Is it like real cutthroat?
     
  8. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,564
    Likes Received:
    743

    Apr 7, 2016

    I am also certified in English, and when I was looking for jobs, it seemed like there was always at least one posting for English per school/district. ELA is one of those subjects that all students must take, so it has the highest staffing numbers, more so even than math or history since not all students take those subjects every year. One thing that will be very important in this area is having a background in ELD or Spanish. You will absolutely be asked about your experiences teaching ELD students and will need to have a strong background in this area to be competitive in the Bay Area, in my experience.
     
    linswin23 likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. tigger88
Total: 234 (members: 3, guests: 209, robots: 22)
test