Little Kids w/ Mohawks

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Ms. I, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    In your school & area, do you see a lot of little kids (especially ages 10 & under) w/ mohawk hairstyles? What do you think about it & the parents who allow this?

    I see it sometimes. No offense if any of your own kids have mohawks, but I really don't like it personally on anyone of any age, but on little kids especially! Mohawks are known to signify rebelliousness & I just don't think it's good. And sure enough many of the kids I've come across who have them have that smart-assy, rebellious attitude. They're probably the bossy/bullying type amongst their peers too. Sometimes I wonder if it's mainly their father's idea who wants to have a tough kid. :confused: And I have no idea why any mother would want it, unless she thinks it's cute when they're really young.

    Of course I'm not saying everyone w/ these kinds of things are bad, but it's like tatoos or lots of piercings. Society views those things in a certain way.
     
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  3. Jem

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    I had a student last year with one. He def. had that attitude, as did the parents. I liked him a lot, but I'm not sure it was the best choice for him. I don't mind kids expressing themselves, but I think that sometimes parents push it on their kids to make themselves stand out. Like they are using their kids to be fashionable.
     
  4. kcjo13

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    My nephew wears a mohawk every summer. Not the gelled up type, just a strip of hair. He looks really cute with it. He's 9. When school starts he has to cut it because his school doesn't allow that type of cut.

    I guess it's all in your preference. 'Course, I have a tattoo too. And 4 piercings.
     
  5. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    I don't mind the mohawk one bit, on any age.

    When I taught elementary school (private) one of my students had a mohawk, sweetest little boy in my group (and no dad in the picture).

    My HS students that play football typically all get mohawk haircuts before their first game ... it is a sign of solidarity and team, not rebellion. Some teachers grumble about it, but I'm not one of them.

    I know many professionals that have tattoos and piercings and unusual hair-styles. I see it as a way of self-expression, not rebellion. Some people choose to carry expensive handbags, others choose a certain hair style.
     
  6. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    If the kid likes it and wants it, why not. I prefer not to stereotype on looks. People often think I am a "girly" type because I have long hair, a nail polish obsession and wear a lot of skirts. Hah.

    I've also had people assume I am a snob because I like certain designer things. The reality is I like what I like and I take care of what I have. I don't care what anybody else wears.

    Bad attitudes are separate from hair styles and should be addressed by responsibly authority figures.
     
  7. Blue

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    I agree, I don't like them. But, like many fads, they seem to come and go.
     
  8. Hoot Owl

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    We had one kid with a mohawk last year and the mother coudn't understand why the kids always picked on him. I personally don't have a problem with self-expression, but this created problems for the kid.
     
  9. Crzy_ArtTeacher

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    Mohawks are very common in my school and I personally think they're great.

    I see no connection with hairstyle and rebellion and when I have children I'll be the first to give my little boy a mohawk if he so desires, or if I do when he's young.
     
  10. peachieteachie

    peachieteachie Comrade

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    I love mohawks. I think they're so cute and interesting. I had a boy in my 5th grade class come to school with one around springtime. It was dyed blue. I thought it was great and took some pictures. However, the administrator did not like it at all. She requested that the color be changed, and eventually the mohawk ended up going out the window too.

    A lot of people in the school system in my county see them as a distraction. Personally, I don't find them anymore distracting than teachers coming in and out of the room, calling out, hyperactivity, etc.
     
  11. turtlegirl

    turtlegirl Companion

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    I teach first grade...my son was in K last year... he wanted a mohawk.. of course I didn't want him to have one... his aunt told him I was too "uptight" and would never let him get one.. guess what... I did.. my 5 year old is the quietest kid you will meet, never says boo, his teachers love him... when he got the mohawk, he came out of his shell and had a new sense of confidence.... I am glad I did it... he is now back to his "normal" hair. I feel that there will be way to many things I have to say no to him in his life.... a mohawk wasn't one of them!

    Sure I got alot of slack from parents who said thanks now my child wants a mohawk because Mrs. E's son has one.... and quite a few more kids got mohawks last year but I will never forget the positive impact it had on my son.

    I did go to his teacher and "apologize" for any disruption it could cause.. she said the moment he walked in was really the only time the kids paid any attention... after that it wasn't a problem..
     
  12. KinderCowgirl

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    I was in my hair salon last week and the father was trying to convince the kid to get a mohawk like his cousin had. The kid was in tears, adamant he just wanted his same haircut. I had a student and mom with matching ones once :eek: .
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    When my son was little (probably about 4 or 5), my grandmother was visiting from her small town on the Prairies. We were out for a walk and saw a teenager and his younger brother with green and purple Mohawks. My grandma stopped dead in her tracks, stared and said, "Oh my, how could their parents let them do that. I know that you would have the good sense never to allow Alex to look like that!" My response, "Grandma, if a green and purple Mohawk is the most trouble he ever gives us, we will be very blessed!"

    It's hair...doesn't bother me a bit. I may make a light-hearted comment and then move on.
     
  14. brigidy

    brigidy Comrade

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    I've had students with mohawks and it has never bothered me. I've never noticed a problem with attitudes either. In fact, the ones I know that have them (with the exception of one) were good students with a great attitude.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I had a student with a mohawk- no attitude, just his hairstyle preference. He was the sweetest, most sensitive and empathetic creative child...it IS just hair... It wasn't disruptive because I didn't allow it to be disruptive.
     
  16. blindteacher

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    The idea of wearing a mohawk may have originally been about rebellion, but I think nowadays it's become more of a hairstyle than a political statement, so to speak. I personally wouldn't assume that a student had certain beliefs or personality traits (especially negative ones) just because I knew about their hairstyle.
     
  17. Canadian Gal

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    I asked him what I was rebelling from with a Canadian Flag tattoo, the words strength, determination and success?

    My tattoos are covered every single day at work. They are special to me. They are not about rebellion. I doubt my mohawk boys got mohawks to rebel. The idea that society still judges people based on HAIRSTYLE is about as antiquated to me as the idea of judging someone based on their skin colour.
     
  18. blindteacher

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    I don't think judging people by looks will ever become "antiquated." It's something that has always been around and probably always will -- not to say that we should just accept it with open arms, but we shouldn't be surprised when it happens.

    People judge me for my color all the time. Nowadays I won't get lynched, but I do get people talking to me differently, assuming where I live and what I eat based on my color. People judge me by my white cane all the time. They assume what I can and cannot do because of it.

    Sometimes judging by looks serves a purpose (and on the broader sense as well, taking into consideration tone of voice, context, etc.). For example, how do we know others are male or female? We hear their voices, see what they wear, etc. But there are times when that same mechanism that allows us to gauge how to treat others becomes detrimental, such as assuming someone with a mohawk is rebellious.

    I hope I made some sense.
     
  19. Jem

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    I think when you have a hairstyle or clothing style that is against the norm, you have to expect certain reactions, and you have to know that you might get them. When I have pink in my hair, I brace myself for reactions to that everywhere-grocery store, bank, meetings with other people, etc. If I were to walk into a job interview with it, I would have to expect a certain reaction from the administration. It doesn't mean I'm a rebellious person, but I'm certainly aware that is how others may interpret it, and it's limited the times I have it in my hair (I'm back to blond at the moment).

    When you send your child to school with a mohawk, you have to expect that it's going to be interpreted a certain way (even if it isn't). Like one of the PP went in and apologized in advance for her son's mohawk-you just KNOW it's going to cause a stir, good or bad.

    I don't think all kids who have mohawks are looking to create a stir. I'm certainly not looking to create a stir with my color, I just love it. But it CAN, and kids and adults need to be ready for that.
     
  20. blindteacher

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    I definitely agree that if you choose a style out of the norm, you need to be prepared and expect to have others react and make certain assumptions. So there is a certain responsibility that comes with choosing certain styles outside of the norm.
     
  21. heymiss

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    I don't really care for mohawks, but that's because I don't like seeing shaved heads. It grosses me out for some reason.

    But if done correctly, a fauxhawk can be ADORABLE on a little kid, and it can look good on older kids, too.
     
  22. Canadian Gal

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    Now we are talking about the norm - normal is a value judgement. Every boy in my class had a mohawk. Therefore, it was the norm, and I would hate for other teachers to judge them for it.

    In my cross-section of humanity, a few tattoos and piercings are normal. I don't have any friends without distinct religious beliefs who do not have at least one tattoo or piercing. Usually a couple of each.

    You cannot bring in the idea of normal without making value judgments, and that is what I have a problem with.

    I am one of the best dressed teachers that any supervisor I have has ever seen. So, yeah I get defensive when my tattoos suddenly make me rebellious when, when they see me in the classroom the applaud my sense of style and taste. I also see a kid getting defensive if this is normal too him.

    What about boys with long hair? Up north many of my First Nations students had long hair. Turbans? Hijabs? Niquabs? Dueck's? All of these things are common or normal for certain cross sections of humanity, and I have a friend from Quebec who is Mohawk, and he has had a mohawk at different times in his life (usually times of conflict, since it was the traditional war time hair cut of his people) - it was normal.

    I hate words like "norm" and "normal". By nature they imply that one thing is superior to another just because the majority of people do things a certain way. We have laws in place to protect us from the tyranny of the majority in government, and with good reason. What is the "norm" isn't always right.

    ETA - Besides, when did individuality and difference become a bad thing?
     
  23. wikteacher

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    I've had several K & 1 students with mohwaks over the years. I've found that kids may comment on it the 1st day and then it's just normal. I agree with Czacza - it wasn't a problem, because I don't allow it to be one.

    While I don't have kids yet, I tend to lean toward the pick your battles mindset. In general, hair is not a battle I would choose to pick. If the kid is a good kid, a mohawk isn't going to change that and if the kid is a difficult kid, a "traditional" haircut isn't going to change that either.
     
  24. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    ...and bottom line, it should NEVER be a teacher who is making a judgement based on hair or gender or clothing style or...

    :2cents:
     
  25. Canadian Gal

    Canadian Gal Habitué

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    :yeahthat:
     
  26. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    YES, YES, YES!
     
  27. TeacherShelly

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    As my statistics class taught me, normal is just a number.
     
  28. Ima Teacher

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    It's common enough here to make it "normal", so that it's not any kind of rebellion or attention-getting thing. It's mostly athletes.

    My best friend's son wants a mohawk, but she doesn't like them and won't let him have one. They did a compromise, and he has a "fauxhawk". She said that she never imagined she'd be getting up early in order to get her 5 year old's hair gelled.
     
  29. TeacherShelly

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    We have a student who has a fauxhawk, and it is part of a whole package of identifying with the natives of the continents of America. He has a t-shirt explaining how Mexican is the only accurate description of natives of Mexico (not Hispanic or Latino). I had to look this up, but now I get it. His family is pretty assertive/aggressive about letting everyone know they are part of the "wronged". I am doing my best to learn more so I can be sensitive and not offend.

    p.s. he is a bully in our school.
     
  30. wdwteach

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    Yuck- I hate em.
     
  31. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Lots of kids with mohawks around here. Some are faint and some are big. It's just a trend and doesn't signify much in this area. They are just having fun.
     
  32. Alesia

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    I see little kids with mohawks all the time and I think it is very cute.
     

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