Literature-based reading

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by FarFromHome, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Jul 10, 2011

    My new school said that they don't really have a reading curriculum-they do literature-based reading. A book that was mentioned was Strategies That Work, by Stephanie Harvey. Has anyone used this? I am kind of nervous because I have only used scripted reading programs-Open Court and Imagine It. I have a meeting with my new grade level on Tuesday and I would love some tips or information before then if anyone has any ideas. Thanks!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 10, 2011

    My school uses a workshop philosophy...no basals. Harvey's book concentrates on teaching comprehension strategies using trade books.:cool:
     
  4. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Jul 10, 2011

    Thank you czacza. I would buy the book, but they said I can borrow one on Tuesday. I'm looking forward to the meeting so I can actually start to plan. I'm hoping to see my new classroom too!
     
  5. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2011

    Basically, you'll be teaching reading through the use of quality literature. It sounds overwhelming because you won't have a "script" to follow, but the joy of it is that you can assess the needs of your students and teach the skills/strategies you think they should know. No one knows your students better than you so that is more beneficial for them in the long run. A basal can only predict what strategies your students will need to learn, you can pinpoint them and focus on them in whole group minilessons, small groups and one on one conferences. The students will be able to choose books that they like and you'll be able to recommend books as well based on student interests. Students will be more apt to remember the strategies learned if they are engaged in the stories they are reading.

    Those are just some of the aspects of a literature based reading program. You'll love teaching reading this way.
     
  6. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Thank you! I'm hoping I'll love it too-I'm just nervous because I haven't done it before!
     
  7. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    Jul 11, 2011

  8. juliechsa

    juliechsa Rookie

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    Jul 11, 2011

    I would ask if the system is a total readers workshop or also uses some whole class novels.

    If you have some whole class novels, or if you can get enough copies of a book that you would like to read with the whole class, you can often find teacher's guides created for that particular novel. I will often do a google search for "free lesson plans on Book Title" and find lots of good resources that I can adapt. There are also some great mini-lesson books you can purchase if you need ideas for some strategies to pull out of reader's workshop.

    Ask your new team all of your questions. Hopefully, other than the Harvey book they will have a lot of other resources that you can borrow. Good luck!
     
  9. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    Jul 11, 2011

    I was in the same situation last school year and I learned a lot from using the literature circle model. The most difficult part for me was to read all the novels that my students were reading. I set mine up like this: I used a picture book to introduce a strategy to the class, within each literature circle I would reinforce/differentiate the strategy using examples from their novel, and to check for understanding I would give a weekly quiz. I also downloaded guides off the internet and tweaked them to what I wanted. My students rotated a discussion role weekly. I kept it simple with four basic roles. So basically I met with each group twice a week. One meeting was a strategy lesson and the next one was a discussion of the book. If a student needed a one on one meeting I schedule them separately.

    While I was meeting with groups my students worked off of a task list where they did spelling, vocabulary, and silent reading of their novels. Once you get in the swing of things it will come naturally. You should definitely use the Harvey book. It was helpful. This year I plan to start with one whole class book to get the kids in "the routine" before I make separate groups. It also helps if you change your groups up and don't keep the same kids together all the time.
     

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