Literary Non-Fiction - Common Core?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MissNikki, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. MissNikki

    MissNikki Comrade

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    Aug 9, 2012

    What are you all planning on using for non-fiction with the new standards? They dictate that 50% should be non-fiction and 50% should be literature.
     
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  3. mrsenglish

    mrsenglish Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2012

    I'm hoping to tie in nonfiction articles and informative texts with each short story or novel that we read! I have a great book that I bought with 75 nonfiction texts in it that will be a great resource, plus other outside sources.
     
  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Aug 9, 2012

    We've pulled in non-fiction articles and other types of informational text that go along with each fiction text. My grade-level partner and I have spent a lot of time online and in books looking for materials.
     
  5. perplexed

    perplexed Comrade

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    I use the newspaper (I subscribe to it for free--it's something for classrooms), Current Health by Weekly Reader, what was mentioned with the 75 articles I think (Harvey Daniels' book--LOVE!), Stephanie Harvey's Toolkit, CNN news, Time for Kids, and some other articles that I save when I come across. I have a theme/essential question each month and combine literature and nonfiction to fit along. I still need to find more though, so still looking around too.
     
  6. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    I'm thinking the state needs to come buy me a non-fiction library! I'm planning to look through the Internet and magazines otherwise. (sigh)
     
  7. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    We found non-fiction pieces based on a topic that past students seemed to enjoy (war). Then, we created our own multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions that pertain to each NF piece so that they could be used independently to help students prepare for state testing.
     
  8. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    We bought paired reading texts for the students. Kids can read a poem, play, nonfiction piece, or fictionalized story based on the same topic and compare texts. We also have Time for Kids, and a Social Studies Magazine. We use the A to Z libraries too that have a ton of non fiction stories that can be run off. These are good stories on a multitude of topics that kids really enjoy!
     
  9. Jlyn07

    Jlyn07 Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2012

    NY has a website, http://engageny.org that has curriculum maps with suggested titles that align with the common core. It's fairly new and is still in draft form but it's been pretty useful. Math and ELA are mapped for each grade level.
     
  10. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Aug 10, 2012

    We are using many of our science and social studies resources for the nonfiction component.
     
  11. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Aug 10, 2012

    My school has been providing a lot of new non fiction books for teachers, mostly based on our social studies curriculums, which is great because our textbooks stink. Our kids do a lot of non-fiction writing so I end up taking a lot of books out of the library based on what they're writing about and the whole non-fiction reading/writing thing goes together.

    I would love to incorporate some Time for Kids/current events but there isn't much time for that :(
     
  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2012

    There are some excellent biographies, non-fiction and historical fiction (if that counts) out there.

    The Diary of Anne Frank
    Helen Keller
    The Jackie Robinson story (try to find best version for your grade-level)
    Gifted Hands, Kids Edition (heard it is excellent, but haven't read it.)

    While some non-fiction chapter books can be long, remember the basal usually crudely cuts 10 pages out of a 200 page book. As a teacher, I find cutting out a good 50 pages can still far out do what a basal supplies. Class sets of books can be less than $5 a book (postage paid) if you shop around.
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Aug 11, 2012

    What a GREAT idea! That way you KNOW you've done at least 50/50! Thank you!!
     
  14. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Me too! Textbooks, Science Readers, etc.
     
  15. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2012

    We started purchasing non-fiction titles aligned to CCSS as well as taking an inventory of what we had in house. We will be having to pull in other resources from online, newspapers, magazines, etc... but it's ok. Anything we discover that is useful will be documented and added to our bag of goodies. This is really a work in progress and it's okay to not be there 100% yet. The main thing is to share among fellow teachers and be open to the change.
     
  16. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 11, 2012

    I have a small number of nonfiction books in my classroom library, plus I personally subscribe to National Geographic for Kids (just one subscription, but I save them, and therefore have enough for small group rotations). I have asked my P for Weekly Reader and Time for Kids. I also make extensive use of my school library, and have library cards for libraries in two different parishes (I live in one and work in the other). Through the two public libraries, I can check out 30 books!
     
  17. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Aug 12, 2012

    The FLDOE presenters at my conference this summer said that ELA teachers should be incorporating nonfiction pieces from the Science and Social Studies curriculum. I'm not really sure HOW that would work, since the curriculums are not aligned.

    I think I'll add in pieces that go with our short stories and novels. So if I'm teaching Rikki Tikki Tavi, I'll try to find a nonfiction piece about mongooses and cobras and maybe an age-appropriate one about the British Empire in India.
     
  18. mrsenglish

    mrsenglish Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2012

    You are so welcome! I think it's fun for the kids too-- they see real life in fiction and are not as intimidated by nonfiction as they usually are.
     

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