Listening in kindergarten

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by kidsalot, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2005

    Hi! This is my first post and I hope to get some help or tips. I teach in full day (9:00 - 3:00) private kindergarten. I am having a huge problem with my students inability to listen. They are constantly speaking while I or other students are talking. It is constant turmoil! I have tried all the strategies - praising good listeners, marbles in a jar when the whole class follows directions (peer pressure) and a tree of kindness where individual children receive leaves with their name when they display kindness (I have stressed that listening is an act of kindness) Nothing seems to work. I am exhausted and frustrated and feel that this issue is definately getting in the way of their learning. Help!
     
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  3. Mom2Sarah

    Mom2Sarah Rookie

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    Oct 21, 2005

    Though it is difficult to think to "punish" little ones have you thought of taking away privileges for those who are not listening? You could use the card holder from the from of library books and have different color index cards in them. When a student is not listening you can change the color of card. If the problem continues and a red card is at the student's name they miss recess or have to be at the end of the line.
     
  4. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Oct 21, 2005

    This may sound silly, but in kindergarten it is all about modeling. I actually had a lesson on listening in the beginning of the year. We practiced looking at the person who is talking, raising hands, etc. We really worked on giving the person talking attention and looking at them, over and over again. Everytime we came to group for a couple of weeks, this was a minil esson we would practice and review. I would say, now, when someone has the floor, what do the rest of you do. We would review the steps...stop talking, eyeballs on the person speaking, raise hands if you have something to say. I think you need to actually show them, model to them what it is you want them to do. They need to practice , practice, practice it................for some, they have never needed to sit and listen in a group setting etc. It is a new skill that kids really need to learn how to do before they can do it.
     
  5. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Oct 22, 2005

    Thanks for the suggestion. My hands are somewhat tied as I work in an NAEYC accredited program and need to be very careful when it comes to withholding privileges.
     
  6. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Oct 22, 2005

    Thanks for the advice. I have had many, many lessons on how to isten and why it is important. My group of children this year just don't seem to get it.
     
  7. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Oct 23, 2005

    I do quite a bit with , "How do you show me you're listening?" with the kids.
    The "Give Me Five" bit.

    I do an activity after lunch and have them listen to a book on tape and then journal about it before seeing the book. It gives them great practice with listening.

    Put a huge posterboard ear up on the wall in plain view- maybe the visual will help them.
     
  8. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2005

    I love your suggestions! Simple and easy to execute. I will try both tomorrow. Thanks! :)
     
  9. mccwen

    mccwen Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2005

    If all else fails, have them put their hands over their mouths! When my kids raise their hands to speak, they also put their other hand over their mouth to keep from blurting out. The first grade teachers love this because they still do it when they go to first grade. lol
     
  10. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Oct 23, 2005

    I teach them to pretend that their arms are like levers- when the hand goes up, the mouth goes closed and we practice opening and closing our mouths as we put our arms up and down.
     
  11. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Oct 23, 2005

    Consider playing listening games. You can make up simple games where the goal is to listen. Have them stand when they hear a certain word from you. Give a prize (stamp or sticker). Have them touch their nose when they see you do something like sit down. Incorporate it into morning meeting or calendar. Play I Spy. Show a variety of objects, have them close their eyes, remove one, have them look and try to identify what was removed. All these kinds of skills are related to purposeful attention which is what listening really is! Be creative and make it fun. I doubt any kind of negative reinforcement will be too successful.
     
  12. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Oct 23, 2005

    along with Upsadaisy's listening games:
    Have a word for the day. Introduce it at circle time. Have the word written out - and have a picture of the object. This could be coordinated with your theme for the week.
    Everytime a student hears you say the word they get a reward - verbal praise, a star on a post-it-note, a mini-sticker.
    This should help the students to be listening throughout the day.
     
  13. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    Oct 23, 2005

    What a cute idea, Glenda!! That would really emphasize good listening skills. Especially for those students that have problems listening. When they see other children getting rewarded, then maybe they will try a little harder. Great tip.
     
  14. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Thanks, Margo! :)
     
  15. kinder4me

    kinder4me Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2005

    Thanks Glenda for the great idea!!! I have a few talkers that have a problem listening - maybe this will give them an incentive to not talk quite as much and listen more!!! :D
     

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