Listen to what they did to me!!!!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by bmault, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. bmault

    bmault Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I teach in an urban school, 5 classes of 9th grade. Everything is going great in my 2nd year, no pink slips etc. Well, starting tomorrow, I have my only 9th grade English class taken away and replaced with an 11th grade English class. New kids, unfamiliar cirriculum, PSSA goals etc. I am so pissed. They do this because of class sizes, so its not that uncommon. My other 4 classes are the same, so I devote more time to them. I can't help but feeling like this class will be my "red-headed step child". I'll do the work, but I am not happy about it.

    Sorry, had to vent!
     
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  3. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I'm sorry that happened to you. It sucks to be a first year teacher, and when they spring it on you after July, I feel like they're setting you up for failure. Hopefully you can get some time to plan so you're not just a step ahead of the kids...

    11th graders are more mature thoug- maybe you'll like em.
     
  4. wvsasha

    wvsasha Companion

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    Oct 10, 2006

    "when they spring it on you after July,"


    LOL! We didn't even get our class assignments until 2 days before students came in! Some teachers found out then that they would have to teach a class using their alternate certification (for example: they hired in as an English teacher but are also certified history)!

    This is par for the course around here...............
     
  5. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Oct 10, 2006

    That's purely poor management.
    The school should have a tentative schedule in place before you leave in June. AND they should let you know if things are likely to change.

    Who on earth can properly plan for a new curriculum in 2 days? Any principal who would do that is a fool.

    I was p*ssed for my team member who found out he was booted from my team and sent to another grade in July. He's still barely ahead of the kids. It's ridiculous and infuriating. I find it hard to believe that this happens regularly.

    The only thing for a teacher to do in this predicament is complain loudly, bite the bullet, plan her butt off and make the best of it - hoping it doesn't happen again.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 11, 2006

    My school is in a rapidly growing subdivision and we have new students frequently throughout the year--last year we had over 100 new students register during the school year. This rapid growth usually results in having to reorganize classes. The administration can't plan for this, because there is no way to know in which grades the growth is going to occur. Last year, one of our grade 8 teachers was moved down to a grade 4/5 in October--that's where the need was. This year, we know that we will have some sort of class realignment (all of our classes from grade 4-8 are sitting at 31-36 students), but we can't plan what that will look like until we see what kids come in next and what families move during the year (our area is always fairly transient). We went through 3 different tentative organizations in the spring, none of which are the ones we ended up with.
     
  7. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2006

    That is incredible.. HOW are people giong to plan??
    8th to 4th? is she dually certified in elementary and secondary?
    I couldn't work like that..well I couldn't work WELL like that, I need to plan and think and adjust. I had a hissy fit and am still recovering from having my room moved...hehe
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 11, 2006

    You do what you need to do to meet the needs of your school. Grade 8 here is still elementary school and most teachers are either certified JK-6 or 4-9 (grade levels). Many teachers have obtained additional qualifications and can teach any of the elementary grades. As far as planning, you do what you can. Administration is not going to expect detailed unit plans for your entire year with a last-minute change, but will accept an outline of topics as a beginning. It does take a lot of flexibility on the part of teachers, students and parents, but changes are done to maximize the learning opportunities for the students.
     
  9. wunderwhy

    wunderwhy Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2006

    In VA a lot of people are certified K-8 or 6-12. This way a lot of people are certified to teach middle school, which is where a lot of future elementary and high school teachers start out.
     
  10. bmault

    bmault Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2006

    I am kind of looking at this like I will do what I can but try not to go crazy over it. I will do what I can do, but I will not go above and beyond when I have four other classes of the same subject to prepare for. I am gaining new experience and teaching a new (and sometimes more mature) grade. I will survive, but I will get a few headaches, but what am I to do? I think I may ask my principal if I can give up my homeroom to gain an extra 40 minutes of prep time.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2006

    I'm certified math 7-12. One Saturday evening about 10 years ago, I was returning from a debate tournament. As I returned the bus keys, I saw a note directing me to see the principal ASAP.

    It turns out that one of the teachers in my department was seriously ill. As of 1st period Monday, I would be teaching Intro to Calculus in addition to the 5 other classes I already had. (I hadn't seen Calc since the Carter administration.) I was dept chair, so I also had to get copies of my Precalculus notes to the teachers who would be picking up his Precalc classes.

    It wasn't easy-- I didn't sleep much that weekend-- but I taught the course and it all worked out fine. It made me a stronger teacher (since I could see where some of the Precalc material was going.) It made me a far more valuable teacher, since I could now teach a course that a lot of my peers would shy away from.

    Try to keep an open mind and not stress. You're certified to teach the course, you CAN do this. It's a SECOND prep; there have been years when I've had four. Two really is manageable, I promise. In fact, this year I have only one prep. It's easy, sure, but tends to be boring teaching the same lesson 5 times a day. You may find in the long run that you prefer having more than one prep; I know I do.

    And next summer, revise your notes and keep them in a file in the event that you teach Juniors again.

    The best of luck to you!
     
  12. TheyLetMeTeach?

    TheyLetMeTeach? Rookie

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    Oct 14, 2006

    Wow, and all this time I've been feeling so sorry for myself for having to teach 5-8th grade Social Studies, after teaching a self-contained 6th grade classroom for the past three years. At least I found out about it before we got out for summer vacation, so I had all summer to plan for (read: FREAK OUT OVER) my new assignment. I still don't get how they can get away with what they did to you, though. With most jobs, you know what you're getting hired for, and in Arizona, you sign your contract and it just says they promise you a job; not necessarily a job doing WHAT. Like a friend of mine once said, "They could have you stacking sh*t with toothpicks!" I guess we should be glad for the job security, even though it comes with a lot of strings attached. Good luck and I'm sure this will make you a stronger teacher. We all know how pissed you are, though.
     

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