Line up and dismissal issues

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Sarge, Dec 10, 2014.

  1. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Dec 10, 2014

    Any transition that involves leaving the classroom is taking forever and causing us to be late to lunch, library, or just about any place we need to go.

    And getting ready for dismissal takes 30 to 45 minutes if I don't want the room left in shambles and the kids to go home without their homework (or their jackets, backpacks, lunch boxes, shoes etc.)

    When we need to go someplace, I tell them to go and get on their numbers outside the door. They do this (eventually). But I have about 5 who will still be in the room gathering what they need (or think they need) while the rest of the class waits.

    Then, once the class is ready to go, some of these kids will exclaim "I forgot my ________!!!!" and run back into the room. Again, this could be something legit like their lunch or jacket. Or it might be some ridiculous toy they want at recess. Either way, they charge back into the room, leaving me no choice but to wait with the class (kids are NEVER allowed in the room alone). If I'm lucky, I have the door shut and locked before they do this. If not, we will be stuck waiting.

    Dismissal is worse. They are out at 2:30. I cannot keep any kids late. So at 2:30, if I say to get ready to go home, half will get ready and the rest will just pretend they didn't hear me and continue whatever we were doing even if it was classwork. Getting them to do anything to clean up the room is next to impossible.

    I will even offer them free time on the playground if they finish early. if I say (at 2:00) "Once your desks are neat, and the area under them is neat, and your jackets and backpacks are on, you can all go to the playground" I guarantee you that at 2:25 there will still be kids who have not accomplished ANY of the tasks I have asked them to do. And I can't send them to the playground alone, so, once again, the class waits.

    These are second graders, so I understand they often need a fire lit under their bottoms to get them moving, but this group is ridiculous.
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Dec 10, 2014

    My class struggles with this too. I have about 4 kids that we're always waiting on, and one in particular (I've started other threads about the student) who just simply doesn't the skills to pack up and go in a timely manner. That student has lost the privilege to have any supplies at their desk, which has helped moderately.

    I do "magic trash" to get the floor clean and it has helped immensely. Pick one piece of trash without saying what it is. Tell the kids whoever picks it up gets a prize. When the room is clean, dramatically announce the winner.

    No tips for putting on backpacks or stacking chairs and lining up more quickly. I want that secret too.
     
  4. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Dec 10, 2014

    Maybe a buddy system? Have a speedy kid help a slow kid get packed, then get themselves?

    Use a timer. Keep track of time needed, and graph it so they can see the trend-hopefully it will go down.

    Break down the tasks. It can be overwhelming to put away your work, put books away, get your coat, chair up, line up, backpack ready. Maybe combine the timer with each individual task. Gradually combine the tasks together.

    Try not to save all tasks for the end of the day, or right before lunch. Have a 30-second floor blitz every couple hours-everyone find 3 pieces of trash (or things that don't belong and put them away).

    Assign checkers for each task-one chair helper, one book straightener, one trash police, etc.

    I'm sure you probably have thought of a lot of these things already-I hope you come up with something!
     
  5. TamaraF

    TamaraF Companion

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    Dec 10, 2014

    If it a few particular students, the same ones each time, ask those kids to start getting ready earlier than the others. That way they are not keeping the entire class from valuable learning time.
     
  6. showmelady

    showmelady Companion

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    Dec 10, 2014

    I sub, and consequently do not really get to know all the students in each class.

    So, when it comes time to get ready for dismissal I have a method that works well for me. There are bus riders, car riders and walkers. Bus riders go out first. So, I usually ask the bus riders to get their backpacks etc from their cubbies, then get any papers from their mailboxes to take home, and bring those things to their desks.

    Then I tell the car riders and walkers to do the same. That way each group is ready when they must leave the room.

    If it is required that the chairs be stacked, I usually do that, as it seems chaotic for the kids to do it. That way they can stay in their seats until their bell goes.

    And, when I walk out with the car riders and walkers I INSIST that they stay with me until their "person" arrives, as I do NOT know their parents/grandparents/uncles/aunts/sisters/etc so I always insist that I actually see their person before letting them go.

    And I have no problems getting all this done in just about 8 minutes. (usually how much time I have)

    And, once the students have their belongings and are awaiting the bell, I try to go over at least one of the things I taught during the day. And sometimes give them info about that item that was not covered in the lesson. (like telling them about nocturnal animals, or telling them how to go to NASA.gov on their computer to see pics of the stars, the earth, the astronauts, etc. They love this and it keeps them organized until the bells go.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Dec 10, 2014

    Someone told me about using a piece of music (clocked at the estimated time needed to actually get ready) and playing that as a signal. You must be ready to go with such-n-such by the time the music ends. It has been working wonders, but requires some practice.
     
  8. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    Dec 10, 2014

    This might seem to young for some, but my kinders count to 100 for all transitions, except lining up. We count to 50 to get in line. This includes getting lunch boxes or treats for lunch, jackets,or whatever. Once we leave the classroom no one is allowed back in. If you forgot a jacket because the art room is cold, too bad.
     
  9. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Dec 10, 2014

    I've found its easiest for me to have them pack up hours early. We usually pack before starting math, so about 2 hrs before going home. Then there's no running out of time, it seems to go faster, and I can glance at cubbies to make sure they got emptied.

    For clean up, I tell them to sit in front of their desk when their area is clean. Then I can easily glance and say "nope try again" without having to go looking for the right kid
     
  10. kellzy

    kellzy Comrade

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    Dec 10, 2014

    Give them a warning, if they don't do it make them stay in from recess to practice your procedures.

    I tell my kids that if they waste my time, I'll waste theirs.

    As far as making sure they have homework, and everything else they need to take home, they get to make their own choice, but if they come in the next morning without their behavior chart filled out and signed, or if they don't have their homework, there's a consequence. And they know it. There's a few this point in the year that don't do it, and they haven't had recess in months. That's okay by me.
     
  11. daisycakes

    daisycakes Companion

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    Dec 11, 2014

    I teach music, so I don't have to deal with clean up issues like this. However, there is a first grade teacher in my school who gives students 3 minutes to clean up for recess. If they do not get the job done, they stay inside and clean during recess where she can focus on them. Sometimes one or two have to miss the first 5 min of music because they didn't clean up. I respect the system. I know a lot of teachers don't want to spend 2 seconds of prep or recess with kids, but I bet that if she didn't do this, it would be 20 kids not cleabing up instead of 2.
     
  12. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Dec 11, 2014

    We practice all transitions at the beginning of the year.

    I also let them know what is happening next. We are on our way back to the classroom. Students have just been told to take out their books, sit at a particular table, etc.

    I started both systems and it has made a difference over the years. If things take a while, then practice again. Put them on a timer and do a class reward if they are making good time.
     
  13. LiterallyLisa

    LiterallyLisa Companion

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    Dec 11, 2014

    My groups are bad about this as well! Last year's group couldn't wait to get into the hall to see other students. This year I can't get them out of my room!!

    I have started using certain things to my advantage. Some of the students we are always waiting on love end of the day jobs. (straighten rows, bookshelves, trash/desk inspectors, board) I call students row by row to pack up, they pack up and sit in their seats as quick as possible, and many of them raise their hands to get one of the jobs. It puts a pep in some of their steps. I also do things like, the table that is quiet/packed/ready/sitting/etc quickest and quietest will line up first for lunch/library/class change/bathroom, which means they will get to those places first, and that is an incentive for some...


    It's middle school though, so it is a lot different. But one thing I would change is, if you forget it, you forget it. No going back into the room and wasting everyone else's time.
     
  14. bewlove

    bewlove Companion

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    Dec 11, 2014

    I am a new teacher this year. I have also had this issue, and here is what has worked for me. What behavior system do you have in place??? Clip chart or something similar???

    For lunch, recess, etc. I started giving them a verbal time limit. For example, "You have sixty seconds to get what you need and line up." And then I will watch the clock and give a verbal countdown, especially during the last ten seconds. Those who are not ready can clip down, those who are ready can have an m&m, whatever works for your kiddos.

    I also announce that they have to have everything by that time. Those who forget something will clip down, and I am firm about that. That has really minimized my issues.

    As far as trash during dismissal, I have this issue as well. I found it helps to assign a couple of trustworthy kids to make sure chairs are put up and books and big items are up off of the floor. The other thing that works great is playing "mystery trash". You mentally choose a piece of trash on the floor (I.e. A piece of a crayon, candy wrapper, etc.). Once you've chosen, you tell the kids to play mystery trash. They pick up as much trash as possible, but they have to show you what they picked up prior to throwing it away. Once all trash is thrown away and the floor is clean, announce the winner and give them some type of small reward (my kids will work super hard for one m&m or a clip up for the next day). I know it is probably too much bribery, but it's made my life easier. :)
     
  15. bewlove

    bewlove Companion

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    Dec 11, 2014

    After I wrote a post about this game, I saw that you did too :) oops! Sorry!
     
  16. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Dec 11, 2014

    We are in snowsuit season, so we play Simon Says to pack up at the end of the day. It keeps everyone engaged and focused.


    At the end of October I wore a stop watch for a week and kept track of their daily transition time. We graphed our time each day and watched the numbers decrease over the course of the week. That was a huge motivator.
     
  17. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Dec 11, 2014

    This. Telling second graders that you will take back any time they waste of yours is a REALLY good motivator. I used that last year on my 2nd graders and they stopped wasting my time pretty dang quick when they realized I was serious.

    Practice routines. Take away their free time to do it to make it personal -- if it impacts them negatively to not do it right, they're more likely to learn it. It sounds mean and it kinda sucks if you're not usually the "mean" teacher, but they need to know you mean business. If they have no consequences for wasting time, they'll never do what you need them to do in a timely manner.
     
  18. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Dec 12, 2014

    So... how's that working for you?

    It doesn't sound like a very effective solution if some kids haven't had recess for months. Maybe they need a different motivator so that they actually do what they are supposed to the first time.
     

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