Library Organization- Genres

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by giraffe326, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I read The Book Whisperer over the summer and I am sorting my library into genres. What is an easy way to determine genre? A website perhaps?
    Amazon was not helpful. AR just says fiction or non-fiction. Good Reads allows people to give it a genre, so not the best resource.

    Picture books are easy to classify, but I do have many novels in my class library that I've never read.
     
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  3. BookReader813

    BookReader813 Companion

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    Aug 5, 2013

    Scholastic Book Wizard...you'll have to search each book, but it'll help some.

    By the way, I read and loved that book. It really made me rethink the traditional approach to language arts and reading instruction.
     
  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Read the blurb on the back. It can give you a pretty accurate idea of what genre it is. I have my fiction sorted into realistic, fantasy, mystery, and historical, so that covers most of the genres. I only have a few books that are science fiction, so they get combined with fantasy.

    Thanks for the suggestion of Scholastic Book Wizard; I had never heard of it before!
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I sometimes get stuck with the difference between realistic fiction and mystery without reading the book. I think I tend to stick it all in realistic fiction. :whistle:
     
  6. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    The Book Whisperer is a fantastic resource. The author spoke near me recently, but I was not able to go.

    I would also enlist the kids to help. Maybe do a quick sort of the obvious ones. Put the ones you aren't sure of in a basket and, after a genre lesson, give students bonus points for reading the book and deciding the genre. Of course, it won't be perfectly done.

    Goodreads is fairly accurate.
     
  7. Matt633

    Matt633 Comrade

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    Why genre and not by Lexile? Haven't read "The Book Whisperer," I'm intrigued!
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I have more than one kiddo that can't write their own last name, so I don't think I can rely on them :(
    I haven't figured out if any are capable of helping or not. Maybe one. We haven't done much academic work since we are still stuck in routines/procedures/behavior.
     
  9. redheadkate

    redheadkate Rookie

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    I sort mine out by genre, too. I usually just read the summary on the back and then look it up online if I'm still not sure. I think it should give you a good idea from the summary alone, though.
     
  10. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    I prefer the genre because I find my students are more willing to read a more difficult book (not one that is too hard for them, but might be harder than they would normally pick). In my experience, the students on the lower Lexile levels don't want others to know how low they are, so it would be much more obvious if they were always selecting books from a certain section of the library.
     
  11. Matt633

    Matt633 Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2013

    We read many novels together as a class. I keep it by Lexile for Reading Counts program for independent reading. Most of these books are read at home. I am going to have to rethink this though!
     
  12. Sm2teach

    Sm2teach Companion

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    There is an iPhone app called BooksApp 2. It is free in the App Store. There is a pro version for $3.99. I haven't had a chance to use it yet, but you just scan the bar code of the book and it gives you all kinds of information. I just scanned Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and it told me Author, Publisher, Release Date, Description/Summary, ISBN-10, ISBN-13, Length, Dimensions, and Subject. The subject was Juvenile Fiction/Fantasy & Magic.

    The App is designed to help you log and organize your library.
     
  13. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Thanks :)
    I just downloaded it!
     

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