Leveling without embarassment

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Teacher Chele, Jul 23, 2015.

  1. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

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    Jul 23, 2015

    How do you label your books so that children choose their books without getting embarrassed?
     
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  3. 1stGradeRocks

    1stGradeRocks Comrade

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    Jul 23, 2015

    In my 1st grade classroom, my leveled books are in bins with animals. Level A books are in the alligator tub, B books in the bear tub, C books in the cat tub, etc. I printed off matching labels with the animals and put them on the books so that the labels on the books match the pictures on the bins. Then I can tell students which animal bin to choose books out of for Reading Workshop. I think the animals help as opposed to using the letters or numbers of the levels. Not sure if that would work in 3rd grade though.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 23, 2015

    Trust me. Kids know the difference between an alligator book and a cat book. They know the difference between the blue basket and green basket. There need be no embarrassment of what level a kid is reading. Grow a mindset and culture in your classroom that everyone is a reader, that everyone is getting what's right for them and that everyone is capable, contributing and integral.
     
  5. live

    live Companion

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    Jul 23, 2015

    Finding a good fit book is one of the first lessons I teach each year. With this, I don't level books; I organize them by genre or author and the students learn how to find a book that they can read independently.
     
  6. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Jul 23, 2015

    Yes! I agree with czacza 100%. In my last year's class of second graders I had a level D reader and up to an O reader in Sept. I never had any problems or comments. Some of my top readers would find lower leveled books and reread them because they enjoyed them in grades K and 1. Higher leveled readers would read to lower leveled readers and lower would read to higher. Everyone was a reader.
     
  7. 1stGradeRocks

    1stGradeRocks Comrade

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    Jul 23, 2015

    I just want to clarify that I've never had any problems/comments either. Everyone in my classroom is a reader too. :) I completely agree that students know the difference in the various level books. I created the system that I use to help me and my 1st graders keep my leveled books organized. It's just something that works for me. :2cents:
     
  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jul 24, 2015

    I either would not level them or just be practical and straight-forward in the leveling. Kids know... and I daresay the vast majority of kids in the younger grades don't care what level every other kid is at.
     
  9. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Jul 26, 2015

    I use to organize my books by genre...with a "pocket check out system" to go with it.

    It worked for a school year, but not helpful for my students who were driven by AR points. And it drove me insane because the cards would fall out. Students would take books without checking out any ways. Books wouldn't be put back in the right basket--even with stickers and genre information printed on labels RIGHT on the book. I could go on... :)

    I went back to organizing by AR points because it was just easier..and less anxious for any of us. And my students have NEVER shown any embarrassment---but that might be because I make the statement of, "I LOVE all books in all levels!" and they get to read all of them as well. I open the reading levels from 0 to 3rd grade for ALL my 3rd graders. You'd be amazed at the number of books kids miss when they don't get to choose in those levels.

    Whatever you decide, it'll be a great adventure!
     
  10. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Jul 27, 2015

    Just wanted to share... I was one of those kids that really struggled with reading. I was really embarrassed when I couldn't read in front of other students in first and second grade. Starting in 2nd grade, I was put into a special reading program and was given books that I could actually read! I was so excited that they actually had books I could read and that made me feel a lot better about myself.

    When I was ready to try something harder, my teacher had no problems with giving me a higher level. I think that was just as important. I appreciated being allowed to challenge myself when I was ready.
     
  11. Sunskyteach

    Sunskyteach Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2015

    I don't. Do you walk into the school library or public library to find all the books leveled? I feel the kids need to learn that so they don't get overwhelmed when you go to the library and so you aren't hit with a many comments of "I don't know what book to get!" This is where teaching your kids about good fit books and when maybe it's necessary to abandon a book or never take it back to your seat. I label by genre.
     
  12. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Jul 27, 2015

    When I taught third, I gave students a range of book levels they could read. Like, "This week I want you to choose from the red, blue or yellow shelf." That way it wasn't as clear who was on exactly which level. My students also knew that if there was a book outside of that range that the really wanted to read, they had to ask me, and then try the first chapter to see if it was a good fit.

    Now I teach high school, and I don't care what they read. I just want them to read!
     
  13. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Jul 27, 2015

    This is an awesome reply! If I have a student who appears embarrassed to read an "easy" book, I'll ask a popular, strong reader to read the book. Then I can point to the strong reader and say, look at Suzie. She's reading a great book. You can read it next if you are lucky.
     

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