Let's share ideas for writing using Mentor Texts/Read-Alouds

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by passionateacher, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I am starting to plan my Writer's Workshop for the quarter. I brought some books home and have started reading them and putting Post-Its with questions to ask when I read them to my 2nd graders. I also put prompts on the cover to remind me of what the mini-lesson is when I actually use them. I was googling these books to see if I could find "reading guides" online and thought, "Hey, why don't I see if my fellow A to Z-ers would like to collaborate on an ongoing resource?!"

    If you'd like to collaborate, post the title and author of a book you have used/will use as a mentor text/picture book to teach a writing strategy. Then tell what the prompt or strategy is that you will teach using the book.

    I'll go first:

    In my Momma's Kitchen by Jerdine Nolen
    Prompt: Write a descriptive paragraph about what you do in your favorite place. (Or they could write a descriptive story about an event that happened in their favorite place)

    PM me if you're interested in the "draw conclusions/make inferences" types of questions I came up with.
     
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  3. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I decided it would be easier to just post the questions as well versus PMing multiple times. Here are the questions that I came up with for the picture book: In my Momma's Kitchen.

    The pages in "In my Momma's Kitchen" are not numbered so I will write the section title and the questions under.
    Answers I thought of are in parenthesis.

    "First in Line"
    1. Draw a conclusion about how Nadene is able to read the letter with her eyes closed. (She memorized the letter) Why did she do that? (She was probably so excited she read the letter multiple times)
    2. Why did Daddy sing Nadene a song instead of just telling her he was proud of her. (Sometimes people sing when they are really happy)
    "The Wedding"
    3. Use context clues to draw a conclusion about who Janie is. (A cat because it says she meowed. It also says she stopped hiding when she saw the buttermilk and cats like milk) Why do you think she wiggled out of the wedding clothes? (Cats aren't comfortable in clothes)
    "Talking Pots"
    4. Why does the narrator compare the cooks to hummingbirds? (They were humming and their arms were flapping rapidly)
    5. Why do you think Aunt Gloria sighs and shakes her head after mentioning her Mama? (Her mom is probably no longer alive)
    "Corn Pudding Time"
    6. Why do you think they usually say the kitchen is Momma's? (Momma is usually the one who cooks in the kitchen)
    7. Why do you think the narrator enjoys when Daddy makes the corn pudding more than the actual corn pudding itself? (He sings and dances and twirls with his daughter while he makes it)
    "Nighttime Serenades"
    8.Why can the narrator only count 'clock ticks' at night? (It's quiet at night since everyone is asleep and she can hear better)

    Hope this is helpful for someone. I will continue to post ?'s/ideas/mini-lessons for books as I read them.
     
  4. MissHunny

    MissHunny Comrade

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    Aug 28, 2009

    A few off the top of my head...

    The Important Book by Margaret Wise Brown
    Strategy-focus
    I use this book to help students understand that they need to find the most important part of their narratives and to then blow up that idea with details and vivid descriptions. This will encourage students to write more specific, focused small moment stories.

    Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey
    strategy- content
    Robert had ducklings in his bathtub to prepare for this story and while writing it. He researched ducklings by doing this, so that he could incoprorate accurate, detailed information in his story. This is to help teach kids that writers often research to communicate true tiny details.
     
  5. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2009

    Thanks MissHunny. I will definitely use your 1st lesson when I move on to the Small Moments: Personal Narratives book by Lucy Calkins.

    I am going to use Aunt Isabel Tells a Good One to teach the essential parts of a story (characters, setting, problem, solution).
     
  6. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Aug 30, 2009

    Owl Moon--similes, slow-motion climax, imagery, focusing on one event

    Charlotte's Web--just the beginning--great hook. Uses dialogue/question/suspense for a hook


    I saw a new book advertised in a magazine. It's "The Plot Chickens". Anybody read it yet?
     
  7. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Aug 31, 2009

    Did you really mean 'chickens' or did you mean 'thickens'?
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 1, 2009

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