Lesson Plans

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by tiki7719, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    For the secondary level, how detailed are your lesson plans? Does your district make you turn in lesson plans?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    In my building, it reallys depends on how new you are.

    New teachers submit lesson plans to their department chair each week. When I was chair, I didn't worry so much about format as what was being covered.

    Now I don't submit anything. My chair and AP both know I'm teaching what I should-- that I'll cover the material and it will be done right.
     
  4. Ms. Geography

    Ms. Geography Comrade

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    District wide our LP have to be sent in on Sunday or turned in Monday morning.
     
  5. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    How much do you think they pay attention to the lesson plans?
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    In my 4 years of teaching, only one year did all staff have to turn in lesson plans. I suspect they were given a glimpse every now and then.

    Now, the only time my admin asks for lesson plans is if they are making a planned observation.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    When I was chair, I read each one. I knew, of course, that they were subject to change.

    But sometimes a teacher would leave something important out. (like the fact that certain types of algebraic equations need to be checked each time.) More importantly, they gave me a good idea of how the teacher was pacing herself-- and how likely she was to run out of time at the end of the trimester. It's much easier to catch that early!
     
  8. MrsTeacher2Be

    MrsTeacher2Be Companion

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    We have to turn plans in every Friday, though our P says he doesn't check them until Monday. I'm not sure how much they're checked because I know I've forgotten before and nothing was ever said, but I don't make it a habit. We're a pretty laid back school. Ours are not detailed at all. For example, they look like:

    Monday, Date...
    The students will solve linear equations.
    The teacher will work and explain several examples.
    Homework: Students will complete a teacher-created worksheet.

    Tuesday, Date...

    and so on and so forth.

    It's really not a big deal since it only takes maybe 10-15 minutes once a week, depending on how many preps you have.
     
  9. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    We had to about four years ago with a new admin and prinicpal change but they were so overwhelmed (as were we) with all the new policies and changes they implemented I doubt they were ever read. Our new P and super had a form we filled out for the week very similar to what msteacher2b posted. It wasn't difficult to do but many teachers resented it for some reason. I am still not sure why - I basically just copied from my plan book since I still keep a pretty detailed plan book.

    Anyway, this duo only lasted two years as did the turning in lesson plans.
     
  10. rachaelski

    rachaelski Habitué

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    At my previous school, we turned in very detailed lesson plans, nearly scripted. In addition, we had to turn in any materials that would be used for the lessons. Our plans for the week were do Sunday at 5pm. At my new school, we are required to turn in a monthly snapshot of what is being done in class.

    I actually prefer to script out my lesson plans. It makes sure I have all my bases covered and that I give the best possible lesson to my kids. That being said, I am only in my fourth year teaching, and this is the third subject/grade level change I will have encountered. Ask me again after I have taught the same level/subject!
     
  11. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    We turn in lesson plans every other week (A-M does one week and N-Z the following). They include objectives, teaching method and assessments. For the teaching method we're expected to include what reading we're doing, every teacher no matter what subject is required to do a 15 minute reading block each day, and then whatever else we're doing. I know my AP at a minimum reads is quickly because there will be little comments on them from time to time.

    I don't mind doing them and always do them even when it's not my week to submit them. As a new teacher it definitely helps me stay on track with what I need to cover each week.
     
  12. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Nope. I keep a calendar with what I'm doing. We have a binder with a course of study for each grade level that we follow as a general guideline.
     
  13. LMath85

    LMath85 Companion

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    I've only been teaching for a few years, but I have never had to hand in my plans to my AP. We only need to submit what we are teaching over the course of five days. During an observation, the Principle or AP will ask for my plan after which is expected.
     
  14. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    Wow, I didn't know that it varied so much.

    thanks for the responses :) I was just curious as to how often they are looked at.
     
  15. Mrs. Q

    Mrs. Q Cohort

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    Thanks for asking this, tiki! I've been wondering, too. I'm still a semester away from student teaching, but for all of our field, we've had to write extensive, VERY detailed lesson plans -- Objective, rationale, detailed instructional input, detailed independent practice, etc. It's extremely time-consuming and I've been worried about how I'll ever make it with a toddler at home. It seems like once I graduate, it may not be such a huge issue.
     
  16. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    MrsQ - the first few years I taught, I did write very detailed lesson plans for myself and yes they were very time consuming. I needed the process of preparing myself on paper and I truly believe, for me, writing out my lessons made my first year teaching a success. I still write more details in my plan book than most teachers who have been teaching as long as I have but in no way do they resemble my first year lesson plans.
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Every monday plans are due to me for all teachers. Its school policy. Their very simple. I just need to know the agenda each day and what you are covering.
     
  18. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    I believe at least turning in a simple lesson plan or outline of what is anticipated to be covered is a good idea. That way, at least the teacher should be following the curriculum/standards.
     
  19. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Ours were due at the end of the quarter. We never had to turn them in to the department head.

    Mine, however, are detailed - UBD unit and daily plans.
     
  20. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    In 6 years of teaching I have never turned in a single lesson plan, even for an observation.
     
  21. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    Now for those who have to turn in their lesson plans, are you in a bigger district or smaller?

    Do you think that makes a difference?
     
  22. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    I'm in a fairly small district, and we post our plans online within the Edline (a student information system) program where parents and students can login and view the data. All we generally post is a topic for the day, and any assignments. This is theoretically checked by administration, but I doubt they look carefully. I forgot one week early in the process (we just bought Edline) and nobody said anything.

    That said, we do have to have a detailed plan for any observations. But these are only twice a year.
     
  23. Lindsay.Lou

    Lindsay.Lou Companion

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    Jul 21, 2009

    I only have to turn in lesson (albeit, very detailed lessons) for my (once quarterly) observtions.
     
  24. dovian

    dovian Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2009

    I am in a Big City School District. We are required by contract to turn in plans weekly, though how much that is enforced depends largely on the building. In my current position the principal requires plans weekly AND we get feedback on them from the VPs. Our plans must have standards, objectives, materials, and daily class activities, including page numbers from the text and HW assignments. They also ask us to underline "instructional strategies," which is largely a matter of finding a catchy name for whatever you're planning to do. It sounds like a lot of work but it's really not, and I do all of mine on the computer so I can reuse them easily. As far as I know, nobody ever has to turn in crazy grad-school plans, though.
     
  25. ambritlit

    ambritlit Companion

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    Jul 22, 2009

    I taught the last two years at a Catholic school. We didn't have to turn in lesson plans for each day, but we had to turn in a plan for each unit. They were not very detailed.
    Now I'm going to public school where we turn in lesson plans every week, AND my new department head was my PPR teacher for alt cert program (that I'm just finishing). I do hope the real ones aren't quite as involved as the ones we had to do for class.
     

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