Lesson Plans

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cutelilram, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2012

    Do any of you still write or type out your lesson plans as if you were doing a formal observation?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 9, 2012

    No.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    No. I'd retire if I had to. Seriously.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I would find out if the P requires one and go from there.
     
  6. treefrogs

    treefrogs Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2012

    I write out unit plans. I also make a calender for each quarter, briefly laying out my plans for each day.

    I would ask what your admin's expectations are for lesson plans.
     
  7. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Yes. We have to. And we have to keep them in a binder in the classroom where they are available to admins. Technically I think we're supposed to have the weeks lessons in there by Monday, but since no one has ever even looked in there sometimes I do my planning throughout the week.
     
  8. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Nope, I never write formal plans. I write a very general lesson plan in my plan book every day. I include my objective(s), warm-up, and list of activities/assessments. (I ignore the lines of the boxes and basically use three boxes per course that I teach.)

    All teachers at my school are supposed to keep a plan book, but most don't go into very much detail.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I write lesson plans which are really just a daily to-do list for the week with standards attached. They take me just a few minutes to do since I keep a lot from semester to semester. They are no different than what I'd have if I was being formally observed.

    And they are nothing like the lesson plans I wrote in college. Those suckers took me hours to do for just one lesson!
     
  10. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Yes, we're required to. It takes about an hour and a half a week to write them. :(
     
  11. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Sep 9, 2012

    I do write up formal lesson plans, but they aren't as detailed as college lessons. I usually have one objective for the week for each subject and then the plans look like this:
    P: Introduce Mm, Read Mm story, Watch Mm clip, listen for /m/ beginning sound in words, T make M circle map (s generated words), look for letter Mm and objects that begin with /m/ around the classroom
    M: book, clip, chart paper
    E: Student participation/T observation

    Some subjects may have more details and I usually include higher level questions when they apply. I plan with my team for about 45 mintues each week where we decide what concepts to teach, share activity ideas, problem solve if certain concepts aren't going well and then I write them on my own. It takes me probably 1.5 hours or a little more depending on if I have taught the concept before or not. I can copy and paste somewhat, but things have changed a lot over the last few years and I have to start from scratch on a lot of things.
     
  12. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I've already spent an hour working today and I've only done writing and part of reading for the week. And I'm not even being as detailed as normal because everything is so basic/introductory this week.
     
  13. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    The lesson plans we're supposed to turn in are ridiculously long and complicated. Plus I think they expect me to write them in Spanish. I did that for a few months then stopped. It took way too much time. Now, I just write whatever I write down in my plan book for myself. In English.
     
  14. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Ours are a minute-by-minute account of each day. They are due the week before we teach them.
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    No, not even when I'm having a formal observation.

    My department chair cares about what I actually do, not what I plan to do. I don't hand anything in.
     
  16. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Just ridiculous.
     
  17. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    This. I teach two different classes and it can take me over 4 hours to type both lesson plans every week. The template for my school's lesson plans is 5 pages and when I fill it in, they are always 6 to 8 pages long. Then I have to print and have them in my classroom box every week as well as post them online. We do have the choice to do weekly LPs (which I choose) or daily LPs, but either way it sucks.
     
  18. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I honestly would not be able to work in a place that required lesson plans like that. I give way too much of my extra time to school as it is. No way could I give an extra 2-4 hours just to write out lesson plans. I can accept silly demands from admin that seem to make no sense, as long as it doesn't require a huge amount of extra time. 2-4 hours is a huge amount when I already give too much as it is.
     
  19. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    During student teaching, I have to write a formal lesson plan for every lesson I teach. One assignment is a unit plan with at least 5 lessons. Of course I'll need written feedback on everything I do. Even my mentor teacher thinks the procedure is ridiculous.
     
  20. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Yes, I'm required to write them out and submit them each week. The district where I was last year was very demanding in this regard. For each lesson (and keep in mind that I taught 35 periods of all different subjects/grades a week), I had to include:

    standards
    objective
    anticipatory set
    procedures
    methods of differentiating instruction
    closing
    evaluation
    homework
    materials

    Heaven forbid they weren't highly detailed or if the admin stopped by and they weren't available or what you were teaching did not align with the plans that had been submitted and approved. I estimated that it would take me about 1/2 an hour to plan for each period so that's 35 divided by 1/2 = 17 1/2 hours a week of planning. :(

    For the district I'm at now, I'm going to submit my first set of plans tomorrow so I can't be sure how strict they are. The principal did tell me that there was no specific format so I'm hoping that what I put together is good enough.

    Edited: Fixed my bad math! Oops.
     
  21. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    We have to submit them twice a month. No required format other than to include an objective. The rest is up to us. Little details or tons is fine as long as it is working in the class.
     
  22. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I had to do that too- and I taught every lesson, every day for almost the entire year! It took me 10+ hours on the weekend to type them up, print them out, and organize them into my binder. One subject was about 3-5 pages and I also had to attach any paper materials I was using. For 6 subjects per day!

    Now, I type mine up in a four blocks. The first block lists the subject and time, the second block lists the objective (we're required to write them on the board, so I quickly type whatever I want it to be so I don't have to think about it in the morning), the third block lists the materials I need, and the fourth block outlines a VERY brief plan that probably wouldn't make sense to anyone but me. We don't have to turn them in. I usually have about a page or a little over one page for each day.
     
  23. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    Sep 9, 2012

    I'm not required to turn in any lesson plans at my new school. At my old school, I had to turn them in weekly. I type up my lessons with enough details that I could leave them for a sub if need be.
     
  24. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I turn in lesson plans once a week using a parish mandated format. My principal does read them and often comments or questions on them (in a good way, in fact, she just sent me an amazing email on my plans for next week and asked to be able to come in and co-teach one of the activities.) I came from a school where my principal never read my plans and it showed. I got lazy. Now, I'm on top of my game. I'm planning much more in depth and I know the lessons and activities are really hitting the skills I'm wanting.
     
  25. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    I respect elementary teachers for managing so many subjects/preps, especially when they have to write lesson plans for each one.
     
  26. Harmony2

    Harmony2 Companion

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    Sep 9, 2012

    I am an ST and I have to do a formal lesson for everything I teach in the long format required by my college. I also have to submit plans to the P at the school. My college wants them with the NJ Core Standards, even though this district is no longer using them, but using the Common Core. And all standards have to be written out, not solely the strand numbers/letter. And I have to submit the plans to the P using the CC standards. So basically I have to write two different lesson plans for the same lessons. :)
    I am teaching my first lesson on the 20th and have already started outlining it so I am not pressed for time. I can only imagine how much time this will be taking when I am taking on all the lessons. :whistle:
    I am not complaining because I know this is part of it, but it makes me appreciate even more, how much work teachers put in; how they go above and beyond every single day. :)
     
  27. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    No way!

    You only have to turn in lesson plans if you are in your first 3 years of teaching. I type up notes for myself for each lesson, but it is more like a schedule with talking points.

    I have to type up a formal, thorough lesson plan when I am observed, which is once per year.
     
  28. TerriInCa

    TerriInCa Companion

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    I have to turn them in ever Thursday evening for the following week. Never allowed to email them. It must be printed out stapled and hole punched and placed in the P's box.

    They are informal really, but the format doesn't work for my style. Its a list of each subject we are teaching, the lesson in the textbook (chapter & lesson #) plus the homework we are assigning per subject per day. I am not a list person so adapting to this style has been difficult for me. So I basically do my plans twice each week. I write them in my lesson plan book and then redo them in the list format for the P.

    If we get them given back to us then there is something wrong we have to "fix" so far I haven't had any given back to me.
     
  29. treefrogs

    treefrogs Rookie

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    I was in a district that required detailed lesson plans that had to be in a very confusing format. What I found was that 90% of the teachers spent more time working with those plans as opposed to developing support materials and practical lessons. At my current district, while we do need to plan out how we will hit our objectives, we are given more creative licence. I see so much more learning going on. I love that I can I spend time prepping for my lessons how I need to, as opposed to having my time sucked into a specific type of lesson plan.
     
  30. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    That's crazy. I graduated last May, and throughout all of my student teaching and practicum lessons, I never touched the old NJ standards. Your university needs to get with the times. Now I don't have to list any standards because I am following the curriculum so it'd be double work.
     
  31. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    My first year, we had to use a "suggested" template. I switched it from horizontal to vertical and got in trouble. I then learned that "suggested" meant "must do." We had to submit plans two weeks in advance and would be in trouble if there were any variations, which sucked for the kids if they needed remediation that I hadn't built in on a day I was observed.

    Nobody has ever asked for plans at my current school, but we do turn in team meeting minutes, and are supposed to be working collaboratively.

    My lesson plans are usually just bulleted lists, linked to my unit standards. I tend to switch things up on the fly, so rigid plans don't work for me. I basically just have a destination in mind and some routes to take. If something bombs with my first period, I'll consider shaking things up for 2nd.

    By the end of the day, my lesson plans look kind of like a flow chart with notes and comments. Next time I do a similar lesson, I refer back to this and create a new bulleted list type plan. I use a sketch book for my lesson planning.

    Hmm. Rereading this, it sounds like I don't know what I'm doing when I walk into the classroom each morning. :lol: in reality, I'm pretty good about having every minute plus transitions filled with extra material that can go or stay depending on our needs. My style is just kind of fluid and based on student response.
     

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