Lesson Plans

Discussion in 'High School' started by lowes48, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. lowes48

    lowes48 Companion

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    Aug 1, 2011

    I am already pulling my hair out and I haven't even started!! :dizzy: :eek: I will be teaching World History, and Geography, and our curriculum just changed last year. The curriculum is so broad, and this district is very strict about how they want your lesson plans done. We are on block schedule, so I am trying to plan some lessons that are engaging!! Please help!! Did I mention this is my first year teaching?;)
     
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  3. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Aug 2, 2011

    I've taught both those classes... on a block schedule even. But what exactly are you looking for here? Just general activity ideas, or specific lessons? Or... ? What do they require you have in your lesson plans?
     
  4. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Aug 2, 2011

    Same here although I haven't ever taught on a block schedule . . . let us know what help you need
     
  5. lowes48

    lowes48 Companion

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    Aug 3, 2011

    my lesson plans have to have the intro/hook,modeling, guided practice, checking for comprehension, indep. practice, assement, and closure. my first objective is: compare and contrast govenmental forms (democracy, aristocracy/obigarchy, etc) as practiced by the societies that adopted them over time.

    Are there any good sites I can get sum really great ideas from? I have a projector in my class. I know I can use powerpoint, group work but what else to get them engaged? Can someone pm me your best world history/geography lesson?

    Thanks
     
  6. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Aug 3, 2011

    Hi,
    I haven't taught these specific topics in a long time, but here's a quick thought that came to me. You can present students with definitions of the various forms of government that you want them to know, and then put them in groups to read descriptions of societies that used them. When students read these descriptions, they can discuss and provide evidence for the type of government they think the society used. Since you want them to compare/contrast, a Venn Diagram would always work as a follow-up activity. Hope this helps somewhat!
     
  7. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Aug 3, 2011

    After an explantion of each of these types of gov'ts, how about you put students in groups and have them create a society based on those different gov't types; have each group present their society, and then as a class do a venn on the board to compare and constrast the new societies.

    For your direct instruction, a very simple chart that I am sure you can find on the internet for your students to complete. They can then use the chart in the creation of their new society.
     
  8. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Aug 3, 2011

    I think the first thing you need to do with a broad objective like this is figure out what information you want them to know by the end of the lesson/unit. Which specific government forms are you going to focus on (because you can't cover them all in depth)? Of course a democracy is going to be the number one thing, but are there 3 or 4 others that you think (or your assessment measures) really need to be covered in depth?

    Once you've decided that, figure out *how* you are going to present them with the information. Are you going to use your textbook and read sections? Are you going to use Wikipedia type definitions? Are you going to have them read about a system of government and have them analyze certain aspects (elections, voting rights, term limits, etc.)? Are you going to show a video clip or two that compares and contrasts or possibly introduces the information?

    Once you've decided what information you will give them, then decide what you want them to do with it. HistTchr suggested a Venn diagram. You can also check out Dinah Zike's world history foldables. Do you want them to participate in some sort of discussion? Do you want them to write about it? Do you want them to do some independent research?

    Finally, you need to decide how you will assess them on what they've learned. Will you use a project, an essay, a multiple choice test, a short answer test or some combination of all of those?

    (Actually, I usually decide on my assessment FIRST, then I go through the steps I've described, but that's basically how I plan a unit or lesson.)
     
  9. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Aug 4, 2011

    Everything that has been said is good. I'd just emphasize the historical.

    Your objective says "as practiced by the societies that adopted them over time." That's change over time (history) and specific information.

    So in addition to asking yourself about the basic dimensions of each type, you should know in advance which societies they need to understand and how those societies changed over time. The Roman Empire, for instance, is usually an example because all westerners have "the rise and fall" in their heads.

    Students need to be able to identify nations/cultures that used each type of government, how it operated in practice, and how it changed with time, circumstance, etc.
     
  10. BellaEstrella

    BellaEstrella Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2011

    Based on what you are explaining I would first start by a more direct instruction on different government systsems. Then I would select a group of countries that have changed over time, divide students into groups and have them each develop a history of the changes they have experienced. Some good countries would be Great Britain (feudal system- absolute monarchy- limited or constitutional monarchy- and now their involvement in the EU as a confederation). You could also consider countries like the United States, China, Russia/USSR, etc.

    Assign each student in the groups a different job. I used to use group constitutions with my kids- where they set their own rules, job lines, etc. They could divide it up into periods of time, or they could divide it up by job tasks. Since it is the beginning of the year I would suggest you decided that part for them because as hard as it is for us as teachers to get in the swing of things in August, it is that much harder for the kids.

    I agree with the comment that you should think about designing the assessment first. I highly suggest that. Make the assessment to align with what you want them to know, then go back and align lesson to get to those ideas.

    Good luck!
     

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