Lesson Plan Format?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by pwhatley, Jun 4, 2007.

  1. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 4, 2007

    What lesson plan format does your school (or you) use? In school (i.e., college), we were required to use the Madeleine Hunter format, which meant that each individual lesson plan could get to 5 or 6 typewritten pages! :eek: The ones I have seen used by real teachers in their real classrooms were generally one page for the entire week! I'm just curious as to what is out there and being used. :D
     
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  3. Miss Jana

    Miss Jana Rookie

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    Jun 5, 2007

    I think most teachers use a grid with just a small block for each subject. I know in our school, the lesson plans are online and we must submit them each week. They are standard blocks. The nice thing about the online plans is that the blocks lengthen if you need to write a lot in there. Most teachers don't, however.

    I know what you mean about college....my lesson plans were definitely PAGES long in college. I think that when we land that job, though, they figure we can plan everything we are going to need/do in the lesson ourselves...admin just wants to know BRIEFLY what page or unti we are doing. At least that's what I think. :)
     
  4. Rivindei

    Rivindei Rookie

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    Jun 5, 2007

    We also create ours in boxes. I've been creating mine in Microsoft Word and then I just email them to my principal. You quickly learn to abbreviate and condense. I remember those college days of a 3-4 page lesson...yuk!
     
  5. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Jun 5, 2007

    The nice thing (the ONLY nice thing, really...) about the "long format" lesson plans is that it DOES force you to think about all te steps involved with whatever you're teaching... gathering up the materials, how are you going to start, etc... and since you've DONE a ton of the,m it's easier to think of all those things WITHOUT having to write them down.

    The only times since graduation I've had to write 'long format" plans are for formal observations. ;)
     
  6. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    Jun 6, 2007

    Ditto to above - long lesson formats are for formal observations only. I email an excel to my team and principal. Topic, page #, and objective are all that is required.

    db
     
  7. michelleann27

    michelleann27 Cohort

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    Jun 6, 2007

    We use a spread sheet to may our lesson plans. WE the same format. Each week our principal reviews it and we place it into a binder on our desk and its laid open. By the end of the year we will have a yearly plan. Its is checked each week and we have to code our objectives into each lesson so we know if we taught all of our objectives or not.

    I also rememeber those long long long lesson plans they were not fun.. but you are right about one thing it makes you think about what you are reading and doing for each lesson. I do not miss them though....
     
  8. TeachtheWorld

    TeachtheWorld Companion

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    Jun 6, 2007

    I've got to have a "long" lesson plan ready for an interview in a couple of weeks. I haven't written one since college and I'm lost. Any help?
     
  9. ddb23

    ddb23 Companion

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    google "seven step lesson plan" and you'll find some good help. That seems to be the fashion nowadays....

    db
     
  10. ~~Pam~~

    ~~Pam~~ Companion

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    Jun 7, 2007

    My entire district uses UBD (Understanding by Design). You can find sample lesson plans and templates all over the internet. I find UBD easy to follow and it really forces me to think through the unit I plan to teach and address what's important.

    We don't turn our plans in to anyone, but they have to be available in the classroom everyday.

    Good luck.
     
  11. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 8, 2007

    Actually,...

    I have a "template" that I created in Microsoft Word, if that would help. IM me and I'll send it your way.
     
  12. lisascs

    lisascs Rookie

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    Jun 9, 2007

    HI Pwhatley,
    Would you mind sending me the "template" of your lesson plan?
    Thanks!
    Lisa
     
  13. las0828

    las0828 New Member

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    Jun 9, 2007

    At my University (East Carolina University) we were taught the 6 step lesson plan. I find this style very easy, and useful to use in the classroom. The six steps are:

    Focus/Review (this is where you catch the attention of your students by relating what you are going to do in the lesson). For example if I was going to do a lesson on animals, and how they are alike and different I would put this in that section "(Do a monkey noise) Who can tell me what I just did? That's right! I was acting like a money! (Do a elephant walk) What about now? What did I just do? That's right! I was acting like an elephant!"

    The next step is statement of objective. Here we simply tell the students what we will be doing in this lesson.

    Then teacher input. This is where the teacher does the meat of the lesson. Teaches what she needs to from the objective.

    Then there is guided practice. This is where the teacher guides the students in their task.

    Then independent practice. The students do this on their own, and you assess them if needed.

    Then finally there is the summary/closure. Close up your lesson, and make sure your class understands what they just were taught.

    I find this really easy for beginning teachers because you can write a script to help guide you in the classroom, and have something to fall back on if needed.
     
  14. lisascs

    lisascs Rookie

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    Jun 10, 2007

    Thanks for your help! This format will serve as a great guide.
     

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