Lesson Delivery

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by gillespie, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. gillespie

    gillespie New Member

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    Oct 22, 2005

    I teach primary and have done so for four years now. I thought I was doing great, had never had a bad review, but now I am told that I need to work on my lesson delivery. What does that really look like and what should it look like for primary.
    Any feedback would be helpful. :thanks:
     
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  3. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    Oct 22, 2005

    I'm not sure but I think it might be your set or beginning, guided instruction, student practice, how you are assessing while they are practicing, and their closing - it may also be how you are pacing the lesson - my principal says most new teachers struggle when to move on and spend a lot of time on little things

    I just had a great observation where finally pacing was not an issue (thank goodness!!). The principal loved that I had a five minute warm-up whole group, 5 minute quick mini-lesson, small group math with two small groups and a share what you learned in between each group, and a closing on the carpet where we shared something we learned and then independent writing in their math journals.

    I hope this helps...
     
  4. belovedrebel

    belovedrebel Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2005

    Just an idea...do you have someone who could come in and videotape you give a lesson? I am not an experienced teacher, but I AM an experienced public speaker, so I am approaching this from that angle. Many public speakers are shocked when they see a video tape of themselves speaking. They discover that they aren't doing the things they think they are doing, and that they ARE doing behaviors they didn't realize they were doing (nervous hair twirling, nose itching, etc.) Perhaps you would gain perspective as to what is going on in your classroom if you could watch yourself teach. Since you are unable to be two places at once (both teaching and watching) I wonder if you might find the results of watching yourself very instructive, along the lines of "A picture is worth a thousand words."

    Nobody over the age of ten likes to be videotaped, but if you can put aside the self-critical narrative (Oh, my! I have pantilines, and that skirt makes my rear looks huge! etc.) and really pay attention to how you are teaching, you might see for yourself what areas you need to work on. If you are like me, you might also throw out a skirt or two, but what is a little wardrobe reassessment if the process can improve your teaching also!
     

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