Legal question

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Miss Beazly, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Apr 27, 2018

    HI!
    I am hoping someone can help me or at least point me in the direction I can find the information.
    I have conducted numerous Google searches with no result. Here's the situation: the principal at my school is frequently gone, not for a few hours, but days at a time.When this happens, a teacher or secretary is left "in charge." neither of which have any administrative credentials. I wonder if this is legal.
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Apr 27, 2018

    Here in Ontario it is. If admin is out of the building, we have a "Principal Designate"--a staff member who acts as the principal for the day. They, obviously, wouldn't be involved in any staff observation or evaluation, but are there to deal with student issues, talk with parents, and handle the other administrative tasks of the day.

    While many of the teachers who take on this extra responsibility are working on their admin credentials, it is not a requirement.
     
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  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Apr 27, 2018

    Perhaps a better question would be whether or not the absences are caused by exceptional circumstances - health issues, family issues, staffing within the district, etc. Almost any time that exceptional circumstances are involved, for the most part, the school would be expected to do their best to cover the absences to the best of their ability. It sounds like that is the situation at your school. Without knowing a lot more about the why of the absences, it would be unwise to jump to a conclusion of illegal.
     
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  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Apr 27, 2018

    I don't know enough about the workings and legalities of administration, but I do know my niece's school principal splits time between that school and another school in the next town and that's the way of things. Does the law actually require a principal to be physically present?

    I can see the practical wisdom of having that "go-to" person, of course, which is why having a principal designate is a good idea. But if they have to do stuff to get administrative credentials, well, how are such credential skills being used? So, why so often gone the principal if any ol' body in the building can step?

    I don't mean to be critical, but if principals need administration skills but the average school on the average day can run just find without them with Mr. Joe of no particular administration skill taking the helm...
     
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  6. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Apr 27, 2018

    VickiLyn and MrsC (I assume -- I don't really know much about Canadian law) have given pretty good answers.

    If there is a law against it, then it would be a state law. Contacting your state board of education should help
     
  7. Miss Beazly

    Miss Beazly Rookie

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    Apr 27, 2018

    [QUOTEI don't mean to be critical, but if principals need administration skills but the average school on the average day can run just find without them with Mr. Joe of no particular administration skill taking the helm...[/QUOTE]
    Excellent question and my thoughts exactly! Our administrators are salaries easily three times that of a teacher, yet apparently, a teacher can do the job.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Apr 28, 2018

    Excellent question and my thoughts exactly! Our administrators are salaries easily three times that of a teacher, yet apparently, a teacher can do the job.[/QUOTE]

    I'd be careful with that logic. Subs in our state are not required to have a teaching degree but teach classes in the absence of teachers. Some teachers leave fluff for subs but others require teaching of full lessons on content. Does this mean that apparently anyone can do a teacher's job?
     
  9. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Apr 28, 2018

    Back in the days before we had multiple Deans when the P was out, for whatever reason, there was a designated person to act as P. It was usually a teacher and sometimes that person would have a sub and they would be located in the office. Other times, the teacher would be in her/his classroom.

    Now that we have multiple Deans that doesn't happen as much. Only when they are all out, which is usually at a District PD type of event.

    As to the legality of it, I don't know.
     
  10. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    It is legal here. Similarly to what others have responded, when the principal and vice principal are both out of the building a teacher is designated as the 'teacher in charge'. He/she handles all the duties that the principal would handle in a day, except for teacher evaluations. Depending on the size of the school, a sub may be hired to cover the teacher's class so that he/she is free to deal with issues as they arise. When I started teaching 10 years ago, the 'teacher in charge' handled all the issues as well as taught his/her own class all day. I think they received $30/day in compensation. It was completely NOT WORTH IT, so many teachers refused to take on the additional responsibilities. It' can be a great opportunity for teachers to 'try out' being admin while they work on their credentials.
     
  11. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Apr 28, 2018

    I'm curious why legality is a concern of the OP.
    Did something happen in the principal's absence.
     
  12. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Apr 28, 2018

    The sign of a well-run organization or group is how it functions without supervision.

    That being said...

    If you can tell when the P is out, that is not good. When you have problem kids who can smell the fear and absence of administrators, yeah...all hell can break loose. Same applies to renegade teachers. When nobody follows the rules if the P is out, you have trouble.

    I think there may be some extenuating circumstances where the supt. knows this is going on, (medical condition) or maybe not. Usually, the asst. P takes over. Or the gym teacher, for some odd reason. Or the most seasoned teacher. Or the veteran teacher in the building. Surely somebody else besides the secretary has some executive powers. At one job, I was told when the director was out, I was in charge because I was the only one with a degree. :confused:

    Perhaps it appears that she is in charge, but someone else is running the show in the background. She can hold the keys, sign off forms, but that's about it. I sense she was told to say that to protect the real P-in-charge from a zillion questions. Without the real P in the building, you'll wait on some minor things.

    I have had many a day when teachers run the school right in front of the P's face.

    I think the the IL standards are a bit iffy, but clearly someone with admin credentials should be running the store:

    IL Gen Assembly
    "Principals shall be employed to supervise the educational operation of each attendance center. If a principal is absent due to extended illness or leave of absence, an assistant principal may be assigned as acting principal for a period not to exceed 100 school days. Each principal shall assume administrative responsibility and instructional leadership, in accordance with reasonable rules and regulations of the board, for the planning, operation and evaluation of the educational program of the attendance center to which he is assigned
     
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