Leaving During The School Year

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Historyct, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. Historyct

    Historyct Rookie

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    Oct 8, 2015

    I am looking for colleagues' thoughts on leaving during the school year, not to leave teaching, but to transfer districts.

    I currently work in an urban magnet school. Most of the teachers have less than five years of experience and there is no mentorship for new teachers. The faculty is very divided in that conversations between colleagues are minimal and in that everyone mostly goes to his/her office after class. The discipline policy relies intensively on security removing students from class for the smallest of infractions, creating a student climate that is absent of accountability. There are also very few resources available - the most detrimental of which is not having a library. There are no clubs, no sports, etc.

    An opportunity recently presented itself in a rural school district that has a brand new school. From who I know there, the student and faculty climate is very positive, the technology and resources are state of the art, and the support for new teachers is amazing.

    If offered the position, I would, of course, love to accept it, but I am wondering what you all think about leaving during the school year and how I might go about informing the principal.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2015

    I'd recommend reading your contract. If you are 'at will', leaving is a bit easier but not what's best for students (though it sounds like your current school doesn't place a high value on what's best for staff or students) if you are miserable, go.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2015
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  4. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Oct 9, 2015

    I can't believe that school is able to call itself a magnet school. Our magnet schools are super well-funded and offer extra programs beyond a normal school.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Oct 10, 2015

    Two or three years ago I would have urged you to honor your contract. My experience since then has taught me that you need to do what is best for you. I took a job at a school that I knew had problems. Within a week or two, I realized that the problems were much worse than I expected. About two weeks into the school year, a job opened at a school I had worked at as a long-term sub, but it was only for the current school year. Not wanting to renege on my commitment (and also not wanting to leave a permanent job for a temporary job), I didn't pursue it. It ended up being the worst year imaginable, with death threats, weapons, an injury caused by a student, etc... I resigned in April but finished out my contract. Basically, I went through hell for nothing. I still ended up jobless at the end of the school year. I wonder how different things would have been if I had pursued alternatives.

    If this other school isn't likely to have another opening soon, go for it. Especially since you are at will.
     
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  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 11, 2015

    Did you get the position?
     
  7. vateacher757

    vateacher757 Cohort

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    Oct 11, 2015

    If you can get out of your contract I say got for the new position.
     
  8. Historyct

    Historyct Rookie

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    Nov 8, 2015

    Thank you all for the advice. The school was extremely slow to make a decision (I actually didn't find out until last week), but ended up pursuing an internal candidate. Please see my most recent post. Another district is very interested and I am trying to anticipate telling my admin, colleagues, and students.
     
  9. hmsmark

    hmsmark Rookie

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    Dec 7, 2015

    I realize this has been a couple of months, but you or anyone else considering leaving during the year should look into your state's licensing sanctions for breaking a contract. If you have a contract, your state may allow your district/school to request that your license be suspended or revoked for a period of time. This sanction is to prevent large numbers of teachers from jumping ship throughout the year. Of course, they don't HAVE to request license action, but in many states they can. This would, of course, make it impossible to teach elsewhere.
     
  10. Historyct

    Historyct Rookie

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    Dec 11, 2015

    I'm still in the school that I described in the original post, but the state law is that the teacher must give the district 30 days notice before leaving. As long as that happens, the resigning teacher is considered to have left "in good standing."
     
  11. SirNeal

    SirNeal Guest

    Dec 13, 2015

    I had seven years of teaching experience in North Carolina before transferring to the lowest performing school in the state of Virginia. It was the most disheartening nine weeks of my teaching career and I don't know that work has ever been so miserable.

    I'll save the horror stories to say that I quit. I applied to a neighboring district (which was supposedly forbidden) but I was hired and happy.

    Take care of your sanity. If another job awaits...then so be it...
     

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