Leave Replacement Salary

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jorde0011, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. jorde0011

    jorde0011 Rookie

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    Dec 1, 2015

    Does anyone know the salary of a leave replacement teacher in New Jersey? Is it the same as a regular teacher? Or would it be considered more like a substitute? If you're not from New Jersey, I'd also like to know what you think! :)
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    It will generally tell you in the posting - salary per xxx contract. No benefits, but decent pay. Now Source 4 Teachers has gotten into the act, and they will only pay you about $127/day. I would NOT take a long term, meaning a semester, more or less, for that money. That is just my opinion, but you would be planning, etc., for little more than a daily sub rate. I'm not a fan of S4T - they make their money by taking it out of the pockets of the subs. Schools buy in because they get to take someone off the payroll as a sub-caller, but in every district where S4T has come in, the wages paid to the subs has gone down, and this new way to weasel into the long term replacement is a sore point for me.

    If it says salary per contract, you can find the recent contract info fairly easily. Usually level one on the guide unless you have advanced degrees.

    My first job when I went AR was for a full semester bio teacher. I was started on the first rung of the salary guide, but paid as a teacher. When I was hired for the following year, I was bumped up to the next rung, and then when my classes gave me BA + 30. they gave me that pay raise. Benefits kicked in the second semester, which was wonderful, and when I earned my MED, they gave me that bump as well.

    The bottom line is that it varies by district, but if it mentions the salary contract, you are light years ahead of the game. I have seen full semester jobs that are S4T districts, and there is no pay increase. For my long term semester, I signed a contract like a regular teacher. It pays (no pun intended) to know exactly what the school is offering and how it is calculated. I still think that making basically a sub's wages when you are doing full time work is wrong, and that is the S4T norm. If in doubt, ask HR. They will tell you.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015
  4. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    Dec 1, 2015

    A long term sub is usually a prorated salary. If you have no experience or less than a year, you'd probably be put at step one (so say $50,000 prorated to how long you'd be there). No benefits usually.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    In my district you get regular sub ay fr the first X number of days (I'm not sure how many) and after that you are paid on regular step salary.
     
  6. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    In NY it seems to vary - sometimes pretty wildly - from district to district. One of the districts I did a long-term placement at paid regular sub pay the whole placement, one paid regular sub pay for the first 2 weeks and then bumped up $25 more a day, one district paid full teacher salary and benefits.
     
  7. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I'm in a different state and here you don't get paid much more than a regular sub. You start out with daily sub pay and then after a certain number of days (usually around 30, depending on the district), you get paid at the long term sub rate. This is about $40 more per day in my district but is much less than regular teachers, even first year teachers, get paid. I think it's really unfair because at that point you're really doing the job of a full time teacher and not "just" subbing. The position only becomes salaried if it's for the full year, but full year leaves are very rare. Typically subs will take these types of jobs if they are trying to get their foot in the door to find full time positions. Occasionally retired teachers will take them as well, which surprises me. I mean, I understand being a new teacher and needing a resume builder if you can't find a full time position, but for a retired teacher it would basically be like going back to work full time for far less money than you were making before!
     
  8. jorde0011

    jorde0011 Rookie

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    Dec 9, 2015

    Thanks so much for this information; it was very helpful. It really just is different in every single district here in New Jersey. This specific position, I was told did not lead up to contract position. Not sure exactly what they pay is but I may or may not find out sooner or later. LOL. Thanks again.
     
  9. jorde0011

    jorde0011 Rookie

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    Dec 9, 2015

    Same here in New Jersey. I'm discovering that is does vary, and sometimes pretty wildly as you said.
     
  10. jorde0011

    jorde0011 Rookie

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    Dec 9, 2015

    You're right; it doesn't seem fair to be working the job of a full-time teacher when they really pay you like you're subbing. Anyway, it does vary in different districts so it's hard to tell sometimes unless you as up front. Thank you for your response.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Dec 9, 2015

    Typical of S4T posting:

    Long-Term xxx Teacher


    Job ID: ssssssss

    Duration: 1/15/16 – 6/15/16

    Pay Rate: $125/Day


    More typical of most NJ Long Term or Replacement postings:
    xxxxxxx Public Schools
    Language Arts
    Date Posted 12/08/2015 Expires: 12/18/2015
    Job Description
    POSTING xxxxxxx
    LEAVE REPLACEMENT
    LANGUAGE ARTS TEACHER GRADES sssss


    Immediately
    xxxxxxxxxxxxx School


    Staff Needed: One (1) Leave Replacement Language Arts Teacher Grades sssss
    Qualifications:


      • New Jersey Middle School Language Arts Teacher Certificate or New Jersey Teacher of English certificate
      • Knowledge of NJCCCS and the Common Core Standards
      • Must be computer literate
      • The ability to read and analyze data . . . . .
      • Willing to participate in lesson planning, peer to peer transfer of best practices, unpacking Common Core Standards in Language Arts and Math, Writing effective objectives and DOL's, effective delivery of instruction, collegial sharing, and curricular integration
      • Excellent classroom management, etc.
    Salary: As Per Negotiated Contract

     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  12. shockwave

    shockwave New Member

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    Jan 10, 2016

    When I recently did a contracted leave replacement in NJ it was Step 1 on the salary scale for new hires. Per diem leaves are usually sub salary. Don't know if it varies from district to district though.
     
  13. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    My district does regular sub pay for the first ten days, then adds $20 a day afterwards. They do back pay to the beginning of the assignment though.
     
  14. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    I think in New Jersey if you substitute in 1 classroom for 21 days or more you are supposed to be paid salary. I know for the maternity leave that I took over for, they paid me 20 days of sub pay (sucked) and then I went on to the negotiated salary guide (no benefits or dues taken out though).
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Typical of S4T posting:

    Long-Term xxx Teacher


    Job ID: ssssssss

    Duration: 1/15/16 – 6/15/16

    Pay Rate: $125/Day
    I will repeat again that there are as many ways to pay and calculate pay as the number of jobs. If Source4Teachers is involved, however, you will note that on that listing you would be doing full time work for 5 months and only getting paid a small amount above a daily sub rate. Most replacements or long term postings for similar amounts of time would make note of "salary as per negotiated contract." Every district can mix it up, but you would, IMO, be foolish to take on a full time job where you would need to create lesson plans for about the regular sub pay. Schools that used to do payment "as per negotiated contract", but who now contract their subs through S4T are paying about half of what a replacement job used to offer. By the way, that $125 per day never goes up.

    Never take a job like this without getting things in writing, so that you can truly understand the rates in the comfort of your own home, without someone thrusting a pen in your face to "sign now."


    Yes, I have some experience with leave replacements and have seen how things changed once S4T came into the subbing business in NJ.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2016
  16. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Are salaries listed on the district's website?
     
  17. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 11, 2016

    I'm not in NJ. In my district, we have long-term substitutes who can potentially be the classroom teacher from the first day of school through the last. It's actually quite a point of conflict among contracted teachers and was one of the major sticking points on our most recent contract negotiation. In any event, our long-term subs get paid based on the school site. Day-to-day subs make $90-110 per day; long-term subs make $100-120 per day. The higher rates of pay are for at-risk schools.
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Wow - you can have subs for a year and pay them like that? I can fully believe that contracted teachers would have issues with that!
     
  19. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    The issue with the long-term subs is a complicated one. There are almost a thousand of these positions right now, while there are hundreds (or more!) of licensed teachers on special assignment or serving as instructional coaches and project facilitators. Students aren't being taught by licensed teachers, which unfortunately means in many cases they are not learning the skills they will need to move on to upper grades or higher levels. Not only is the quality of instruction often lacking, but there are also a lot of behavior issues, as you can imagine. It has become quite a mess. The licensed teachers are maintaining, correctly in my opinion, that these open positions which are staffed by long-term subs are vacant because of non-competitive salaries and less than ideal working conditions, and that's what was argued during contract negotiations.
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    I would certainly agree that behavior issues are going to rise in such a scenario, and that working conditions are made less than ideal by having unlicensed teachers in the classroom. Although some may be wonderful, others are just there to be the warm body in the classroom. I agree that skill sets will almost certainly not be in place to keep these students moving to higher levels, which usually ends up taxing the SPED services, because if the students aren't learning, it must be a learning disability, right? It is a downward spiral that is hard to stop. You have my condolences for what must seem like a problem without end.
     
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