Learning Elementary Math

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Anonymous425, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. Anonymous425

    Anonymous425 Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2018

    What is a good way for someone like me (a substitute) to learn elementary math methods like number bonds, tape diagrams, etc. ? If I'm given the answer key, I can usually explain the answers alright, but I want to do a better job since I hope to become a teacher. ( I took two elementary math classes several years ago, but the concepts have changed. The ABCTE program didn't really prepare me for it either.)
     
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  3. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I hate that your math methods courses weren't more helpful. My instructors broke down all of the concepts and modeled how to teach everything. I've included a link to our textbook. I'm sure there are newer editions. I found it extremely helpful, and is one of the few textbooks to which I referred once I began teaching.

    Edit: The link won't show up, but it's by John Van De Walle, and broke down all of the different strategies and how to teach them. What is interesting is that all of the "Common Core" strategies were in the edition of the book that I used that had a copyright date of 2001 or so. I often pull the book out as evidence that these are not new strategies.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
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  4. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Comrade

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    Oct 3, 2018

    Check out Khan Academy. They have video lessons of concepts from K all the way through differential Calculus.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 3, 2018

    Khan Academy would help if the issue were grasping the math per se, but I think the concern here is not being caught short by unfamiliar strategies.

    Anonymous425, try searching the internet for the names of the strategies you don't know. You could start with your district website or your state department of education website, depending on the level at which you think the strategies are being promoted. If you search for more than one strategy at once - "number bonds tape diagram", for instance - you might come upon a glossary or list that will explain more than one. Wikipedia may also be helpful. You could also check the local Barnes & Noble-size bookstore or the local teacher-supply stores for books and materials on math teaching strategies. Pay attention to books with recent publication dates. If you stumble across a book for parents to help their kids with math, you might have struck gold - again, depending on the publication date; check the book to be sure it's helpful before you buy, and if it is, it goes in your sub bag.

    If the strategies are coming up in a textbook, you could search the web for the textbook, or to be precise the textbook's webpage(s) on its publisher's website. One publisher has an online glossary of math that's accessible to anyone and might well have been updated to include methods like these.

    You could also try the websites of your state math teachers' association or NCTM, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Oct 3, 2018

    This. It's a wonderful book, and helped me, someone who is extremely strong with math, become more aware of high quality teaching of math.

    https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-e...evelopmentally-6th-Edition/9780205483921.html
    ^ That's one link, but you can search it on Amazon and many other places, I'm sure.
     
  7. nklauste

    nklauste Comrade

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    Oct 3, 2018

    Could you talk to teachers in the district(s) you sub in and ask them to explain it to you? When I was subbing, I found the best way to find out how something is done was to ask a neighboring teacher how they did it. Most are willing to explain it to you and then you know you are explaining it to the students the same way as the other teachers in the school.
     
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  8. Anonymous425

    Anonymous425 Rookie

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    I just found some resources on my district's website that could be useful. I'm excited to look at it. It has worksheets with answers on them.

    Edit: Nvm. It doesn't have the strategies. I will keep looking.
     
  9. Anonymous425

    Anonymous425 Rookie

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    I just found a math tip section for my school district for each grade level's textbook modules. :)
     
  10. Anonymous425

    Anonymous425 Rookie

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  11. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Comrade

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    Oct 4, 2018

    I think (and don't quote me on this) that Khan Academy has all those new and unfamiliar strategies. I believe I saw some when I was looking around. It's worth a look because it's free!
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 4, 2018

    That would be grand, and if you're right, I'm delighted to be corrected on this.
     

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