Late Work Policy

Discussion in 'General Education' started by StudentTeach, Jun 11, 2011.

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Which is your Late Work Policy?

  1. None accepted unless due to excused absence

    17.1%
  2. Certain number of missed assignments allowed/semester

    5.7%
  3. Accepted; no matter how many days late the most you can earn is a 50%

    14.3%
  4. No work accepted after the unit ends; so once you're in unit 2 no work from unit 1 is accepted

    11.4%
  5. Other? Please describe in the post

    54.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jun 14, 2011

    Just finished a school-designed lesson on this very topic. We are trying to rethink our grading policies and were asked to design something for our classroom to show our standing on late work. I created a web page with the following Q&A dialogue:

    Q: Okay, I've had other things going on and I'm a little behind on my work. If I catch up, what's the penalty for turning in work late?
    A: Penalty? Why on earth would I penalize you for realizing your education is important and taking the time to hand in quality assignments? There is no penalty for late assignments in this class.

    Q: Wait, then why do you have a Pacing Guide that tells me when things are due? If you don't have a due date in this class, why bother?
    A: The Pacing Guide is just that; a guide to help you keep in step with where I am teaching the material. Nothing is set in stone except for the date that I must start calculating your quarter or semester grade. That is a deadline set by the school for me and I cannot break it. Between now and then, however, is pretty fluid.

    Q: What if I want to work ahead of where the class is?
    A: I try to release the material at least one unit in advance of where the class is working. However, I will not grade those assignments until the day after we have held our live discussion of the material. That way, if you realize you want to go back and correct what you have done, you can do so before I even look at the assignment.

    Q: That reminds me, what if I don't like the grade I got on an assignment?
    A: You are welcome to redo any assignment for full credit after you have either watched the live explanation of the material (proof you have watched the recording counts) or have talked with me about it over the phone. This includes written assignments as well as automated quizzes. You must talk with me before I will accept or reset corrected work. How else can I help you learn?​
     
  2. Victoriassecret

    Victoriassecret Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2011

    Where I student teach , my teacher's policy is , if you hand in all your work on time , you get extra credit at the end of the year. If not , you don't get the extra credit , but you can hand in all your work for full points.
     
  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jun 14, 2011

    One of the other teachers on my team gives an extra five points to students who have handed in that week's assignments on time. It's a good policy but one I haven't been able to adopt (I have other extra credit methods).

    Hope your student teaching is going well!
     
  4. StudentTeach

    StudentTeach Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2011

    This thread has made me even more confused, now! I didn't realize there were SO many different policies that one could adapt for their classroom. Selfishly, I don't want to accept late work. Unselfishly, I'm thinking of doing the pass system. I'm teaching mostly general level (the lowest of 3 levels) kids next year and I think if I didn't accept late work at all some of them might not pass. sigh.
     
  5. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Jun 14, 2011

    I think every situation is different. It all depends on the type of work it is and the student in the situation. I usually don't mark off points for something being late, unless it is a larger project. Most students that don't turn assignments in on time, just don't turn them in at all. We move on and I don't worry about hounding them for that small assignment. If they were absent and not their to do an assignment, it just does not get marked against them. If they were there, in class, and still turned nothing in, that is marked against them.

    I think whatever policy works for you as a teacher, go with it. If the students are older, they need to know and understand that policy, if they are younger, as long as it is set up with fair guidelines, you don't need to worry too much about it.
    As for school or district policies, I am not a fan. Let teachers run their classrooms.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jun 14, 2011

    Meanwhile, I have a student who called me an hour ago wanting to know if she could turn in more late work to raise her grade to a C. While I accept work up to a point, I had to hand in my grades yesterday. She wasn't even close to passing, let alone a C. I would say the graduation ceremony on Saturday was the cutoff.
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jun 14, 2011

    :huh:

    (ETA: Meaning, wow on the student's part.)
     
  8. Victoriassecret

    Victoriassecret Rookie

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    Jun 15, 2011

    Thanks! Not many people get the extra credit , but the system works pretty well because it rewards those who do. Not sure if I would use it in my classroom though.
     
  9. NUMB3RSFAN

    NUMB3RSFAN Rookie

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    Jun 17, 2011

    Our school has been following the "Power of I" policy in regards to homework for the past three years. Our students are not allowed to take a grade of zero. They have to turn in an assignment and if they don't they receive an Incomplete for the grading period. This year we all read Power of ICU and we now have a spreadsheet that every teacher in the building has access to in which we list missing assignments for every student in the building. Any time a student says they have nothing to do, we check the spreadsheet and have them get to work. Thanks to a grant, we also have teacher-staffed before and after school "Zones" that students can be assigned to when they have missing work. Our students do not get points taken off when they turn in work late, they get accumulate points in our Positive Behavior Discipline System and lose privileges. We had a long debate and as a staff decided that missing work was a discipline issue and not an academic issue. We also felt that if they were dinged for turning in work late on their grade and then dinged in the discipline system then it would be a double jeopardy issue. We also chose to not deduct points on their grade so that their grades reflect what they have mastered and not when they turned in an assignment.
    Our math department takes it one step further. We do not allow our students to take their tests until all homework for that unit is turned in. This means that on the first day of a test, I usually have a handful of students trying to finish missing work before they are allowed to finish their test.
     
  10. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jun 18, 2011

    One thing I have heard of some teachers doing is having a category of their grade called an "On-Time Grade." You track completion of all assignments here separate from the content and quality grades from assignments. So students get a 100 or 0 for turning each assignment in. I've seen systems like this:

    Tests 40%
    Quizzes: 30%
    Homework/Classwork: 20%
    On-time: 10%
     
  11. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Jun 18, 2011

    I don't really have a late work policy. If assignments aren't turned in on time I usually keep the kid inside from recess to work on it/finish it. Mostly they just lose homework points, and I make note of it on their report card. I don't assign marks to assignments - students are either meeting, approaching or below expectations. This is how we report on the report card - no letter grades or percentages.
     
  12. gacd

    gacd New Member

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    Jun 18, 2011

    It all depends on how much credit is given. If it's late daily work which carries small weight, then one might give lots of time or none at all as the low weight will not affect the grade significantly. If it is a test, one might be more concerned as to the make-up time because tests show a lot more of what one actually knows and carries more weight, and because time given to make-up the test should be fair.
     
  13. Bogart

    Bogart Rookie

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    Jun 19, 2011

    A student will have a 0 in the grade book until it gets turned in. I do accept any late work for full credit. Generally, students do get their late work in after a day or two because they have to miss recess until it gets turned in.

    The reason why I always accept late work and require all work to be turned in is because there are some students who would be quite content just getting a 0 as long as they don't have to do it.
     
  14. knitter63

    knitter63 Groupie

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    Jun 20, 2011

    I accept late work for full credit during the quarter.It remains a zero in my grade book until it is turned in. After the quarter is up, that work is gone, since my report cards are done. I send home biweekly reports to tell the student and parent what work is missing. I also keep an "extras" basket of any worksheet or handout I have given. It is the student's responsibility to check that, on their time.
    I have not had much trouble with students waiting until the end of the quarter to turn it all in at once. Since I do the biweekly reports, I have usually contacted, or been contacted, by the parent with these concerns. I also have a late box. As Alice said, sometimes life gets in the way of homework. So, most of the time, I find missing work from the week in my late box on Friday. I also keep kids in at recess, or during reward/rethink period on Fridays to complete missing work, or to locate it!
     
  15. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    Jun 20, 2011

    We can no longer assign silent lunch for missing work. They can have silent lunch if they don't complete a classwork assignment, but only one day.
     

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