Lapbooks/Shutterbooks

Discussion in 'General Education' started by katerina03, Jul 11, 2012.

  1. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

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    Jul 11, 2012

    Hello,
    A few years ago I went to a conference for motivating students to read, and someone there passed around a lapbook/shutterbook and I have always wanted to have my students make one while reading novels. It is a folder, made into a book, where vocab, drawings, discussion questions (endless possiblilities) are kept and organized. Does anyone know how to make these or have an example to share?
    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jul 11, 2012

    I use these all the time in the content areas and LOVE them. There is no right or wrong way to do them. They are huge on the homeschool scene.

    I thought I had blogged about them with pictures, but I guess not because I couldn't find the pictures to share. This is from my teacher store, but there are thumbnails of a project we did to give you an idea
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You can see them a little bigger here.
     
  4. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Jul 11, 2012

  5. time out

    time out Comrade

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    Jul 11, 2012

    Hmm, I never heard of these. What a great way to track your thinking!
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 11, 2012

    Set it up in whichever way works for the novel and you.
     
  7. Ilovesummer

    Ilovesummer Companion

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    Jul 12, 2012

    I've done these a few times before. They're great in science. I usually have the students use a large piece of construction paper folded in half, and then smaller pieces are folded and attached to the inside. Sometimes the shapes of the smaller pieces correlate to the subject. For example, when we are studying the water cycle, we use blue water drop pieces of paper to compare and contrast salt water and fresh water.
     
  8. katerina03

    katerina03 Devotee

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    Jul 25, 2012

    Thanks! I appreciate the help. :thumb:
     
  9. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    Jul 25, 2012

    What a great idea! Does anyone in 8th grade use this? I think it might appeal to the majority esp. if we only do it once. Do the students keep the "books" with them or are they collected at the end of class every day. I could see doing bellwork assignments - it would make them go back and review what was read the day before.
     

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