KWL charts in Kindergarten?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by mudpie1598, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Apr 28, 2011

    Do any of you use KWL charts in Kindergarten? Is there another way that you chart down what children are learning & what they want to know as you are reading a story?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Apr 29, 2011

    umm sorry but what is KWL? :eek::blush:
     
  4. mudpie1598

    mudpie1598 Companion

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    Apr 29, 2011

    KWL = What you know, what you want to know, and what you've learned. It's a simple graphic organizer divided into the KWL parts. Before you read, you chart down what you know. Then, as you read you chart down what you know. Finally, the last thing you chart down after the reading is what you've learned.
     
  5. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Apr 29, 2011

    Depending on what we're doing I sometimes use it. I'm good about the K & W parts, I sometimes don't do the L part.
     
  6. mkate

    mkate Comrade

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    Apr 29, 2011

    Just butting in here for a moment, as I am looking into graphic organizers to use for next year. I use mostly fiction (stories) though, and wasn't sure how KWL would fit in there. Do you use them with fiction?
     
  7. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Apr 29, 2011

    I use mine mostly for Science & Social Studies. I don't think I'd use a KWL for a fiction story. For that I'd use more of a story map.
     
  8. newkteacherfl

    newkteacherfl Companion

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    Apr 29, 2011

    I use them for our thematic units. It helps me plan the unit to cover the things they are interested in learning. I have done one at the beginning of each unit this year, and the kids are much better now at asking questions about a topic. At the beginning of the year, it was like pulling teeth to get them to tell me what they wanted to learn, and now I can hardly get them to stop!
     
  9. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    May 2, 2011

    I am moving towards inquiry-based learning, but always have so much trouble getting past the "W" part of the chart!

    It's so hard for Kinders (especially ELLs with low vocabularies) to develop questions. I model and model but they just can't seem to get past telling me what they know.

    Example:

    Me: "What do you WONDER about fish? I WONDER how fish can breathe under water."

    Kid: No! They don't breathe!

    Me: "For this part we aren't ANSWERING questions, we are just WONDERING. Does anyone WONDER something about fish?"
    Kid: I WONDER I know fish can't breathe.
    Kid: I WONDER I have a pet fish.

    *sigh* (lol)

    Has anyone been able to do this successfully?
     
  10. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    May 2, 2011

    We use these often in my preschool room. It isn't Kindergarten, I know, but the running of the chart is similar.

    We start by reading stories for a few days about the new topic and chatting during a break time, like lining up. Then when we have an understanding, we start to think about it in Circle.

    Sometimes, and often for the beginning of teaching how to "wonder" as a skill, I bring the think in.

    When the children wonder it often sounds like this in my room....

    "Mrs. C, WHY is the sunflower soooo tall?"
    "I don't know! I hear you 'wondering' how the sunflower got so tall, but I don't know. I wonder if we can find out." Then the next person answers the question.

    "They watered it." And I ask the new voice, "Oh, can I grow a sunflower this tall in my bathtub?" And they laugh and say ..."NO!"

    Then I can often get them to understand we aren't answering the questions. The next person will ask a "why" question. I flip it into a "wonder" question and so on. Soon they are understanding it and we are cooking with gas! Now once we get going, we may end up with 3 sheets of wonders and 4 or 5 Know items that we mentioned without belittling anyone.

    I love it! But I have no idea how to use it for fiction stories.
     
  11. sweetz9422

    sweetz9422 New Member

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    May 17, 2011

    Yes

    We use them alot towards the end of the year, mostly in science and social studies. They serve as a good tool for reviewing information when a unit lasts a few days/weeks.
     

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