Kindergarten Literacy Group Possible Idea

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by SCTeacher23, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Oct 2, 2015

    Since my school does not officially start guided reading in K for a while now, I was thinking of using these little booklets that they make/color in small group for now. The booklets have simple sight sentences with a picture to color to go with the letter of the week. For example, if it was "a" the book might be "I see apples." "I see acorns" etc. I don't know if they are ready to read these little booklets independently. I'm not really a fan of round robin, but either a round robin or reading chorally together be appropriate at this point? Or any other ideas?
     
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  3. Bibliophile

    Bibliophile Companion

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    Oct 3, 2015

    Yes I think round robin and choral is workable for your kinders who are coming in at a low level of phonics ability. Our curriculum teaches a few letters the first couple of weeks and then those letters are seen in a sight word by week three. By week five they have done several letters and they have 3 sight words (my I see) and the have 2 books to reinforce letters with those sight words. Your basic "I see a" with a picture of an apple labeled apple, "I see m" with a picture of a monkey and the word monkey. My kids that had TK (TK in California is year 1 of a 2 year kindergarten for kids whose birthdays miss the kinder cut off by as little as a day to as much as three months) came in with a lot of phonics knowledge and they became my high level readers and they review phonics with everyone else but they read more difficult readers already and they are blending cvc' with those same sight words. They are more capable but they are still learning book handeling and foundations of print so they are also do choral and/or round robin reading so that we can be on the same page and practicing and getting feed back on those things because they need it.

    I think it's good to give the kinders the emergent readers with very little content early on because you can work out the skills of book handling and have them worked out by the time you get to the more challenging decodeables. This is my first year with kinder after many years in pre-k and a couple of years as an elementary aide and I was surprised by how much time I'm having to spend on teaching the basics of book handling so I'm glad we started early with round robin and choral reading. Several of my kids couldn't do more then a couple of pages of even the simplest books without getting frustrated and this allows them to still get the experiences and skills.
     
  4. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Oct 3, 2015

    You will get more bang for your buck spending time working on phonological awareness activities at this time of the year, as opposed to sight reading. There's a reason why guided reading comes later. This is the time to make sure kids have a solid understanding of the sounds of language. Focusing on PA, oral language, and phonics will have a great positive impact when do do start getting to guided reading. That doesn't mean that there is no place for teaching sight words right now. Given the time restraints that we all face, I would work on different skills in your small groups.:2cents:
     
  5. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Oct 4, 2015

    I agree with the phonological awareness activities - but I have students on a variety of levels. I wanted to use the books to start to develop early emergent reading skills. Our curriculum gives us 1 letter for each week and 2 sight words to practice. This is new to me because I have generally done a few letters a week and then we did sight words as soon as students learned all their letters. I was thinking of starting my small groups by first reviewing the letters we have already learned briefly on letter flashcards (there are only 4 at this point). Then introducing the letter of the week and the sound it makes. Then, having students trace it in sand. After that, I was thinking of giving each student a variety of pictures and having them sort them by the ones that begin with the new letter and that don't. ("A" words, Not an A word) For my lower group I was going to do it one by one, but the higher group I was just going to set them off to work independently.

    Now for the booklets, I was going to allow my highest group to actually read the book to practice their sight words, but again in a round robin style. The other kids, i was just going to read the book and have them practice holding it and practice pointing to the words to develop emergent reading skills. If the letter of the week was "a", the book would only have pictures of "a" words. I think it would be good for differentiation because for most of the kids, it would just practice book orientation, early concepts of print, and practice identifying more words that begin with the letter of the week, but it would given an opportunity for the highest kids to actually practice their sight words.

    I am not starting this until next week, so if there is any other suggestions or changes I would appreciate them. I am trying to figure out the best away to teach within the curriculum of 1 letter and 1 sight word but also to allow differentiation of the different levels I have right now.
     

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