Kinder student already reading

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Newkindermom, Feb 25, 2018.

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  1. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Feb 25, 2018

    I am a teacher and mom to a 5 year old going to K next year.. I am wondering about what to do with her next year. She is already reading and has been for about a year and a half. And by reading, I mean she can pick up a chapter book and read it and also comprehend what she read. She is very advanced in this area as well as language and vocab.. she is age appropriate in most other areas perhaps a little ahead. I am concerned about putting her into a public school Kinder class where she will spend the majority of her time learning letters, sounds, and numbers (that she has known for 3 years). Although I believe the social aspects of kinder are also really important I’d love for her to work at her level but don’t necessarily see that happening in today’s school. Sorry if I’m rambling and don’t mean to brag about her abilities just wonder what others would do.. or if you are a teacher who has had a child like her I’d love to her how you handled it! Thanks!
     
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  3. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    I've had many kids reading in Pre-K, and they've done just fine going onto public school kindergarten (I'm friends with their parents on Facebook (I only accept requests after they leave my class)).
    They learn a lot more than just reading/language & literacy in Kindergarten.

    Letters, sounds, numbers, writing are all taught in Pre-K
     
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  4. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Ok thanks for your input.. but I guess at my town elementary school they are a bit behind. They mainly work on letters and sounds in the K classrooms.. and very basic reading.. my question is more is it wrong to not seek out something more for my daughter that can already read at around a 2nd-3rd grade level? Like it seems silly to have her practicing beginning sounds and rhyming when she is so far beyond those skills.. Should I ask for her to be moved up to a first grade room for reading time?
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 25, 2018

    There’s no harm in asking. Be careful with the statement that she can read at a second or third grade level. At those grades teachers are lookimg for DEEPER thinking in the text and, especially in third grade, the ability to back up thinking with evidence from the text, as well as the ability to write long about their reading.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
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  6. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Do you know anything about how your school groups students/class lists? I've taught at schools where our K classes were "abilities based" and students were grouped as low, middle, high, very high based on the K screenings. My current school has mixed classes, but students are grouped based on abilities within the class. So during reading centers some students are working on letters, some on sight words, some on readers, but all are differentiated.

    I know we currently have 2 students that go to first grade for reading. If that's an option in your school, it might be something to ask about.
     
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  7. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Comrade

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    Feb 25, 2018

    How is she doing with behavior? I ask because in the K classes I have worked on behavior is enforced and is an indicator if they are ready for first grade.
    Maybe talk to the teachers see if they can give her more advanced reading?
     
  8. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Feb 25, 2018

    I explained how my school teaches reading in another thread, but it's basically taught in leveled small group book clubs. If your daughter was a student at my school, she'd be in the appropriate grade-level classroom (kindergarten, in your case), and she'd be reading texts at her level (second or third grade, according to you) with her teacher individually or in a small group. This would allow for her to get the social experience and learn the structure of being at school, as is necessary in kindergarten, while also allowing her to read at her level.

    I would probably try out the regular public school kindergarten classroom first before you look to other options. Just stay in close contact with the teacher and maybe also the reading specialist early on in the school year so that you can make adjustments or different decisions as the year goes on. I would not assume that it's only going to be learning letters and sounds. Surely your child won't be the only child in the classroom who already knows letters and sounds, and most state standards require students to begin reading books in kindergarten anyway. There is a good chance that the regular kindergarten classroom will be a good place for your daughter, but you'll have to give it a try in order to find out.
     
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  9. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Feb 25, 2018

    Right she definitely cannot do that.. but in terms of just reading a book and understanding it and enjoying it it is easily add a second or third grade level text.
     
  10. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    My nephew was similarly ahead of grade level in math. His school doesn't start gifted until upper elementary, but they always let his go to an older classroom for math. He was ahead of grade level in reading, as well, but the teacher mostly let him do his own thing with reading whatever he wanted, as long as he could meet the kindergarten reading standards about responses and comprehension and such.
     
  11. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    This sounds awesome I wish her school did something like this... but no the K classes don’t even start reading until the middle of the year... and when they do it’s just everyone reading the same Scott foresman leveled readers. I do want her to be with her peers and have friends.. but I also want to find what’s best for her with the gift that she has. She honestly taught herself to read as well.. I feel like she just has a talent and a love for reading and want to encourage it and not have her be bored next year.
     
  12. CherryOak

    CherryOak Comrade

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    Does the school have an assessment prior to K? This would be a good time to ask.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    There’s so much more to reading beyond grade 1/2 than what you describe. Im not saying tgat your child shouldnt read books at higher levels but there’s somuch more to the work of reading at those grade levels and in those texts than literal comprehension. Even in first grade your daughter might be reading at a higher level tgan some of the other students. As suggested above. You need to find out if your child can be assessed and thennask how literacy instruction is differentiated.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  14. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    I skipped kindergarten and went into first grade at age 5. I never had any issues from it, even though I was younger than most of the kids in my class.
     
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  15. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Yes I am also a teacher and I get that I just wanted to emphasize that she is not reading BOB books. She is able to read what a second or third grader would read for enjoyment is my point. I don’t want her to go to third grade and analyze texts, lol. I don’t even necessarily want her to read chapter books.. she just chooses to.
     
  16. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Feb 25, 2018

    You know her best. Czacza is right about first grade reading being different from third grade reading (though I'd also point out that czacza teaches in one of the best school districts for reading in New Jersey*), but you're going to be in the best position you know what she's really capable of.

    My own son could read words at second grade level at the end of kindergarten. However, he was in ELL because he knew very little English. I'd taken him through a reading book myself and taught him decoding (there were are varrious reasons I did this, not the least puff which was knowing that if I didn't it was going to be a huge obstacle because it's NOT one of his natural talents).

    Probably most native speaker children could be taught very early the sounds and words they need for second or third grade and appear to be a superb reader, with concerted effort. You know best how much effort that is and where it comes from.

    * which could be interpreted in several ways -- one being that she may have standards higher than most areas of the country, and another being that she knows what she's talking about.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Thanks, 3Sons. :pMy standards are based on state standards as well as district expectations. ‘Struggling’ in my school wouldnt be considered struggling in other areas. Ive had the benefit of excellent PD (Columbia Teachers College as well as working closely with literacy leaders). Ive taught literacy classes on the college level as an adjunct as well as in regional curriculum PD workshops.

    All that said, I think we should all raise the bar for our students. I applaud the OP for recognizing her daughter’s strengths and for wanting her challenged.
     
  18. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    My nephew taught himself how to read at age 3 and we still delayed putting him into kindergarten until he was 6. He has a late birthday, so my sister and brother in law kept him home an extra year. He loves kindergarten and enjoys the activities the class does with each letter and sound. He is making friends and learning how to be in school. He can read and comprehend a variety of texts, but isn't ready for the challenge of going deeper with books. So, he reads widely for pleasure and still enjoys kindergarten.
     
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  19. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Feb 26, 2018

    When I was a kid (a long time ago, admittedly), my grandmother was a life-time teacher and she would take me into her school to be tested. In 3rd grade, I tested at a 10th grade reading level. What happened? Nothing other than my grandmother got to brag a lot.

    That said, you can always look into a Catholic or other private school and most likely be able to start at first grade. If you think she fits in socially with that age student, it's an option. But, if she starts K in public and is happy and advancing, I would leave it alone.
     
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  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Are there any montessori options in your town? My BFF's child is similarly advanced and has had huge success in a montessori program.
     
  21. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Even though your child is quite advanced, eventually, difficulties in reading will be present. If your child misses instruction in basic skills, reading higher level books would be very challenging in middle school or high school. Your child may already know the basic skills, but needs to experience them in kindergarten. If you throw your child into an advanced reading program and feel your child is ready, it may not be beneficial in the long run.

    It is probably best to have your child in a traditional kindergarten classroom. Of course, you can foster your child's reading interest and expertise at home.
    I learned a long time ago that starting with basics, regardless of the ability, is always the best way to go and has the best outcome (especially for early childhood).
    Your child should be able to acc.elerate her instruction in ELA probably in upper elementary
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2018
  22. svassillion

    svassillion Companion

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    I teach kindergarten and I usually have one or two students who can read at the 2nd grade level each year. We also focus on letters and sounds from Sept-Dec and don't start reading groups until January. I would highly recommend you look at your daughter holistically. Her reading is above grade level, but you mentioned everything else is about on-par. If she moved to 1st grade, could these end up being areas she has deficits in?

    Also, keep in mind that even though she can read 2nd grade level books, comprehension is something entirely different. Some things that occur in texts for older students can easily go over a young child's head as their brains develop.
     
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  23. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2018

    You're pretty much in the same situation as my mother was with my siblings and I. She was a teacher (1st grade) and had three kids who read fluently before K. My family ended up trying several different options. My sister did K at the local public school, and it was a nightmare of frustration because the pace was soo slow and the teacher had a speech defect and was passing it on to her. (I know, not a contagious thing, but when you're teaching new words and can't say them properly, the kids learn them improperly) So Mom pulled her and put her in private school for 1st. Nowhere in my area skips kids grades unless they're foreign, so that wasn't an option. My brother did K at the private school. It was fine, except that they refused to let him do 1st grade math and he was ready and asking for harder work. My family left the private school for several reasons, so I did K in public school in another district (we had deliberately moved into a better district) and it was ok. I went to a literacy-heavy pre-K, and a classmate's mother happened to be a district employee who had all of us from that pre-k placed into the same class, so we were ability-grouped together. For first grade, whole group instruction time was painfully dull, but because there were 31 of us, my class had push-in and pull-out services and I was in the pull-out advanced reading and math groups.

    If you're thinking of asking for your child to be placed out-of-age for either just reading or everything, you have to look at the pros and cons. Even though we were academically roughly the same, my siblings and I were in different places socially. I would have been fine, maybe sis, but definitely not bro. It's not necessarily just social maturity, but personality as well. Is your daughter the kind of kid who is going to be bothered by being different or have trouble integrating into an existing community? (Keep in mind that her potential classmates may have been together for K, which can make it harder for friend relationships to form.) If she's only advanced in reading, it might just be an opportunity to use the extra time you'll have to foster another skill, like dance, music, a sport, or a hobby. The sewing skills I started in K have served me well for my whole life.
     
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  24. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Feb 26, 2018

    Kindergarten is often at least partially about the school format: introduction to school. It's not unheard of to have advanced readers in kindergarten--if you have her skip a grade, I would do it later.
     
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  25. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Feb 27, 2018

    I want to thank everyone for the thoughtful advice. I will definitely take it into consideration. I don’t think I want to go the route of skipping a grade because she is small and on the younger side for her grade. I might ask for her to move up to a first grade room just for her reading group time, though. That is, If I stay with this public school district we are in currently. I am just pretty disappointed with it overall though! It’s hard being a teacher and having kids in the school system.. I know too much! Lol. I wish my area had any affordable private or Montessori schools, but I’m in kind of a rural area the closest schools like that are 20+ minutes away. But perhaps that might be an option. Thanks again!
     
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  26. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Same here -- I was put in Kinder but got booted to first since I had been reading since I was three. I never felt too young -- if anything, I think I would have felt more out of place in my own age group.
     

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