Kind of nervous about this & update

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Bella2010, Aug 10, 2013.

  1. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 10, 2013

    So - update: I talked to my P, and our scores weren't as bad as I thought. :)

    I found out that I'll have two ED kids in my afternoon section. There will be a para with them. They've been known to have explosive behavior, like yelling out and throwing chairs. I don't know for certain they'll be that way this year, but I've never dealt with this kind of behavior. And, TBH, I'm concerned about having both of them in class at the same time. Do I expect the para to curb the behavior but step in if it starts escalating?

    Any advice in advance?

    TIA,

    Beth
     
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  3. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    Aug 10, 2013

    Is the para a special ed para meant to provide them services or is the para just a regular para?
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 10, 2013

    In my school, we would expect the teacher and the para to work to curb the behavior equally. If the student were acting out violently, then the para would assist in restraining the student and removing him/her from the classroom. Or, the para would stay with the student while you remove the other students from the classroom. Either way, if there is explosive behavior, one of you would need to call an administrator to help.

    Bottom line is that they are still your students. The para is there to assist you with them however you determine you need him/her to. Just set up a plan ahead of time.
     
  5. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    She's special ed para assigned to one of the students. The other one doesn't have an assigned para, but my guess is she's expected (not by me, I'm just saying I think that's their plan) to assist both of them.
     
  6. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 10, 2013

    The main thing I would counsel is to stay calm, even when someone has a meltdown. If it gets violent, calmly clear your room (students) - I have taken my kiddos out to the hall in the past (had an undiagnosed ED kiddo who threw furniture - in FIRST!). While you are doing that, the para should be doing his/her thing, and you should "punch the button" for the office, and let them know that Johnny or Jane needs a cooling off period. Usually, a child that violent has a "crisis management plan," of which you need a copy. Become very familiar with it - there are different levels of response to this child's actions that you will be responsible for. At least in my experience this is so.
     
  7. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Aug 10, 2013

    I would want to establish my own behavior plan for these students (obviously this probably won't be the first day- but after you get to know them and see what you need, what works) and give the para clear expectations for what you would expect him or her to do to help curb the behavior.

    I saw my para for my ED student as my first line of defense, if something is happening hopefully she was able to use the strategies that we'd discussed and put into place in order to diffuse the situation. If it was one of the many, many times the plan didn't work perfectly I would step in (or my co-teacher.) Hopefully your students won't be as severe (mine is going to a special school for ED kids now) so the para should be able to control the behaviors on her own. But its still your classroom and you should be the one determining how the situations are handled, because ultimately you're the one responsible for that child's learning and the other children in the class.
     
  8. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 10, 2013

    I'm trying to stay optimistic about the situation. The kiddos are in my room for socialization and are pulled for my subjects. They'll be in there about 45minutes or so.
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Aug 10, 2013

    Does anyone at your school have a speciality in working with children like this? If so, go to that person and ask for feedback. The best thing I can say is proactive management works far better than reactive management but how that plays out will depend on the resources and knowledge your school has in working with these children. Be very in tune with nonverbal language. Often you do have some cues that come up early and can work to diffuse early. After a certain point, it becomes harder to deescalate. I know that doesn't help you get started, but that's my 2 cents to keep in mind. Absolutely stay calm. Sometimes it is a matter of teaching children how to solve problems, coping skills, etc. The thought processes are different and sometimes less flexible in some areas. It can be interesting if you approach it with a positive attitude and be willing to learn to find what works for this child. Having said that, there will be days where it seems nothing works.
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 10, 2013

    You shouldn't have too much to worry about then, if it's only for 45 min. If the students are having a rough day, the sped teacher might just opt to not even send them to your room. The para will likely take them back to the sped room if he/she notices signs of escalating behavior (with which he/she will be probably be familiar) before the severe behaviors begin.

    Try not to worry too much. That's what your sped teacher and paras are there for. Build good relationships with them, and they'll be there to support you.

    Also, the more you can work to build a relationship with your ED students, the fewer problems you'll see in your classroom. Work to make sure they really feel like a part of the class during the time they're in your room. If they feel unwelcome or like outsiders, you're likely to see more problem behaviors. Consider inviting them in to your room for more than 45 min on the days you have special activities going on, and have them sit with your class at assemblies, etc. As a sped teacher, I can't tell you how warm it makes my heart feel when the regular ed teacher remembers and takes the time to invite my sped students into the regular class for special activities. The students appreciate it, too.
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Aug 10, 2013

    Ahh... 45 minutes. I missed that part.
     
  12. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Aug 10, 2013

    In this case, I go with what Bella said.
     
  13. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Aug 10, 2013

    Oh I'm so relived for you about your test scores!

    With having the para with the two, I'm sure you'll be fine; especially with laying down the foundations and expectations. :)
     
  14. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 10, 2013

    You'll have a para with them, they'll only be in your room 45 minutes---you'll do great. :)

    Learn about them, see if you can see their IEPs, treat them as members of your class, and just roll with the punches---figurative, not literal. ;)

    Most kiddos coming to you with an ED label have this stigma attached to them because of their label, and because people remember them throwing chairs, running wild sometimes years ago---before meds, before behavior plans, etc. Try to give them a clean slate and a fresh start--they can be very rewarding students to work with. :D

    I hope you'll keep us updated! :)
     
  15. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 11, 2013

    @applecore - I am sooooo relieved, too! I think, not for certain, that he's still micromanaging a little next year. Oh, well. All I can do is roll with it and fly low.

    Thank you all so much for the words of advice and reassurance. :)
     
  16. eternalsaudade

    eternalsaudade Companion

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    Aug 11, 2013

    In addition to the advice given here, I would strongly recommend you keep an open line of communication with the special education teacher as well as read through these students' IEPs and BIPs to gain an idea of their history and their particular issues and triggers. I was an ED para and the teacher I worked with would not send our kids to the general education environment if they were exhibiting any sort of dangerous behavior. Hopefully the teacher you are working with is equally aware. If your district offers it, I would also recommend training in crisis intervention. In any case, treat the students like any other student while keeping their special needs in mind. Have a behavior management plan and hold them to it just like you would any other student. And most of all, keep a positive attitude and try to form a relationship with the students despite the small amount of time you have with them. The more at ease the students feel in your classroom, the less likely they are going to be to act out and you will likely find that there is a lot to love about them.
     
  17. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Aug 11, 2013

    It's funny you say that. Earlier in the summer, our district sent my partner teacher and me to a crisis intervention workshop. I really think this placement was decided before school was over.
     

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