Kids not up to K level work

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by jlj, Dec 20, 2007.

  1. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Dec 20, 2007

    Sorry, this is long, but please read. I really could use some advice!About 1/3 of a K class is not able to do the Abeka Kinder curriculum. At this point in the curriculum they should recognize all letters, sounds & at least beginning to blend. The remainder of the class are handling the curriculum fine, but of this particular group, not one of them recognize even all of the vowels & their sounds! :eek: None of these children attended our PK.
    This group is the most immature of the class and present a lot of behavior problems throughout the day, not just during phonics lessons. The teacher is ready to pull her hair out! This group was placed with an aide for phonics but that doesn't seem to be working. This group is actually below our PK4 class in Phonics. They decided to start at the beginning, again, and use the K4 curriculum. The idea was to start "easy", build some confidence, give some sense of accomplishment, etc. and really push through & see if they can catch up to a point of being able to do the K curriculum. Now, the K teacher is asking if I (PK4) would be willing to have them in my class for phonics. If I did this it would mean my having to spend more time with them, with different lesson plans because they would not be able to come in where the majority of my students are. We have never had this happen before other than the usual few that need a bit extra!!! Again, not one of these children were in our school for PK. We are a small private school, with one of each class PK3 - 8th grades. Splitting the class into 2 K classes has been considered but it doesn't seem administration wants to do that from a financial stand point. PK is a half day class. Over the holidays I said I would look at the K schedule & see what suggestions I can make that might help her. Oh, they've tried having the aide in the class as well as in another room for phonics. I'm really thinking that a big part of the problem has been the behavior of these children. They don't sit 5 minutes for a story or anything, the teacher has tried several behavior systems, nothing seems to get to them. They take nothing serious. :eek:hmy: And yes, parents have been made aware. I have been in on some of the conferences, and had contact with these parents outside the K classroom and ....the saying "the apple doesn't fall too far from the tree", well.... Anyway, any suggestions would be sooooo greatly appreciated!!! Oh, another kink, the aide is a volunteer that really doesn't want to be there consistently on a daily basis. Anyone else ever ran into this? Thanks for any & all :help:
     
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  3. coffee-queen

    coffee-queen Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2007

    i teach kindergarten at a school where the majority of my students did not attend any sort of pre-school program. needless to say, we're a bit further behind than i have been in other years because it took us longer to learn routines and acceptable behaviors. however, the school i'm currently at uses the Zoo Phonics reading program, and i've never seen so many kids learn their letters and sounds faster! it's fun, upbeat, and the kids love it! within the first month almost all my kids knew their sounds...and by now the majority know the letter names too. i was supplementing Zoo Phonics with Open Court Reading...however i think after break i'm going to have to skip ahead in the open court curriculum, because my kids are getting bored! just look on-line and check it out. it's worth a shot!
     
  4. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    Dec 20, 2007

    I wonder how I ever survived by not even starting school until I was 6 (almost 7) No PreK, no K, just me and 31 other kids with one first year first grade teacher learning how to read, count, add and subtract.

    I'm sorry but I don't think that we are doing anyone any great favors by sending kids to school as soon as they are out of diapers.

    The fact of the matter is that not all children are ready to learn at the same time.
     
  5. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Dec 20, 2007

    Well said, and ITA!
     
  6. CityESLTeacher

    CityESLTeacher Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2007

    It sounds like your school holds K kids to really high standards!
     
  7. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Dec 21, 2007

    ecsmom- you're right, things are a lot different now. Lots more expected, at much earlier ages. It amazes me too. I've been teaching PK since the mid 70's so I've seen the changes in the children, the curriculums, you name it! Some good, some not so good. However, we are given curriculums/standards to follow & expected to do just that. Our curriculum is advanced but I can honestly say most of the children that come to our school can handle it. Yes, all learn at different rates & in different ways, that's why a well balanced, hands-on classroom is still the way to go (which we do). Because it is an advanced curriculum, not all children are ready for it. That's where our problem is with this group. We usually test children going into K & up but these children were not tested. A few are siblings of older students (parents familiar with the curriculum insisting their children were ready) and a few that simply "fell through the cracks" because of so many repair/clean up projects going on during the summer. Anyway, regardless, we now have to figure out what to do for these children.
     
  8. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Dec 21, 2007

    coffee-queen - thanks for the tip about Zoo Phonics. I'll look into it. You said the majority of your class. In that case you may be behind in your curriculum but at least it is for the majority. In the class I'm talking about if the teacher slows down too much she'll be holding too many others back, therefore boredom, behavior issues that can result, etc.
     
  9. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Dec 21, 2007

    jlj- I've used Zoo-Phonics for 3 years now with my Pre-K 4 to 5 year olds. First, they love it. Second, out of 25 kids, all but 2 recognize all the letters and know the sounds. The ones that do not, are not frustrated and love the animals! Most of my kids can blend CVC sounds. Third, you can use the curriculum to supplement what you have and its cheap!!!
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 21, 2007

    The K students in the class of which you post may not be developmentally ready for the expectations set by your phonics program. Sounds like there are 'school readiness' issues as well. The K teacher needs to start again, SLOWLY- ONE letter at a time with many many activities to support the new learning. Build in lots of circle time, read alouds, center work- time to move and groove. They need to learn HOW to be in school as well as the phonics.
     

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