Kids Getting Cosmetic Surgery to Stop Bullying

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by yellowdaisies, Nov 14, 2013.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,471
    Likes Received:
    2,488

    Nov 15, 2013

    Count me in the group of people who might consider certain types of cosmetic surgery for kids. I understand why other people might not want to do it, but that doesn't change my opinion.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,628
    Likes Received:
    1,513

    Nov 15, 2013

    http://www.liposuction.com/obesity.html

    Here is just one article. There are many others. It explains why liposuction is not a fix for obesity and heart problems.

    A friend's friend had liposuction. First she had to diet and exercise and get to the point where her BMI was in the right range and no further weight loss would significantly eliminate the extra fat build up she had. It was painful. It took months to look good. It took a few years for the fat to come back.
     
  3. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,813
    Likes Received:
    52

    Nov 15, 2013

    My daughter had a strawberry mark on her when she was small. My doctor recommended watching it for a few years. It was the size of a silver dollar. It is now the size of a pea. IF it hadn't shrunk, I would have had it removed. It was something I could have controlled as a parent.
     
  4. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,621
    Likes Received:
    5

    Nov 15, 2013

    My 11 year old sister has had two cosmetic procedures this year and will have a third next year.

    1: restitch a facial laceration to minimize scarring.
    2: removal of third nipple (when she had to start wearing a bra it became uncomfortable)
    3: (to be scheduled) scar reduction surgery from a badly healed laceration to her face from before my parents got custody of her.

    I have no problem with any of these procedures, nor would I have issues with things like mole and birthmark removals. Major procedures, on the other hand, I think would be a case by case basis. My parents and I strongly considered breast reduction surgery when I was around 15. At the time I was wearing a 32H/J bra. Not only did I have to deal with peer teasing, but I couldn't buy a bra in a normal store and I have lasting spinal issues to this day because of the damage the weight of my breasts did to my immature skeleton. We decided against it because I did not want to take away the option of breastfeeding if I ever had kids, and reductions, at least the method they used 25 years ago, eliminated that possibility. It was a good choice in retrospect, because my breasts did shrink a cup size with every baby I nursed, so now, even though they're still large, they're not overwhelming. At the time though, the choice was mine, and my parents would have supported me no matter what choice I made.
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    3

    Nov 15, 2013

    My mother considered having my ears pinned back. Glad she didn't. But my husband says he wishes his parents had pinned his.

    Personally, regarding ears, I adore ears like the ones the little girl had originally in the linked story. :)

    Removing marks and pinning back ears if the child wants it? Eh, doesn't bother me.
     
  6. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,653
    Likes Received:
    232

    Nov 16, 2013

    I would never in a million years consider this one for my (future) daughter. I can actually see the other side - girls who are too large in that area, because that could cause a lot of back pain, etc.

    I really don't lump mole removal in with other plastic surgeries, although I think it can get kind of over the top. I have freckles and I have a few moles on my arms and face that stick out (but they are not huge), and they are still there. My mom would have never paid for that, because insurance certainly wouldn't have covered it. I won't pay for it today either. They don't bother me. The BIG moles and marks, ok I can see that.

    I guess what bothered me was that the girl was perfectly happy, then she was made fun of, then the parents "fixed" her "problem." It had never even been a problem until she was teased for it. Well, there are LOTS of other things kids can be teased for that can't be surgically fixed. Also, do people seriously ALWAYS have ears that stick out if they have them as a child? I guess I assumed it was possible that a lot of these things might work themselves out as the child develops.

    Liposuction was brought up - can kids actually get that? I never even thought about that before. That's a little scary, actually. I know that is a major procedure.
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 16, 2013

    Count me as the kid who was ridiculed for not having very much in the way of breast department. Going to the beach was especially awful when some of the other girls from school were around. The one thing about having very small breasts as a teen is that bras have come a very long way and can help with appearance until one determines if augmentation is truly wanted.

    I chose not to have them augmented. A friend of mine chose to have the surgery when she was 20. She was much happier and much more outgoing afterwards. I just made my peace with them.

    It doesn't bother me. If it's a small fix that can greatly impact a child's emotional health, I don't see a problem with it.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Nov 16, 2013

    I can't begin to guess what I would do in those particular circumstances.

    But if it's within my power to make a life altering accomodation for my kids, then I'm at the very least going to consider it. The final decision would be based on a milion different factors.

    There are times to take a stand as a parent... see my "mean mom" post. And there are times when I'm in a position to do things for my kids that will bring them joy.

    As to which case this one is, only the family in the article can say. But I wll say that, as a parent, I'm pretty selfish. It hurts me more than I can say to see my kids hurting. And when my kids are grown, I don't want to look back and think "Why on earth was THAT the hill I chose to die on? It would have taken so little to make a big difference in my kid's lives."

    So it's usually a delicate balance between doing what I know is best for them and doing what I hope is best for them... the vast majority of the time, it's the second. We discuss the options, make a decision, and hope and pray it was the right one. It's almost never as cut and dried with your own kids as it is when you read an article about someone else's kids.

    My real question is who broke this story. The surgeon is quoted several times-- if it was him, then there's a huge problem with his sense of professionalism. If it was the parents, then I'm guessing that their child will be mocked either way now.
     
  9. Ted

    Ted Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 16, 2013

    That's a very good point, Alice.

    I can't believe it would be the physician, because that would be a breach of confidentiality...and if it is, indeed, the parents, I would question their motives because now it's publicly known about their daughter's augmentation.

    What a world in which we live. :dizzy:
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Sea488,
  2. MissCeliaB,
  3. allaphoristic,
  4. Linguist92021
Total: 464 (members: 5, guests: 436, robots: 23)
test