kid who sits on feet...how to stop?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jessiiteach, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

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    Jan 26, 2012

    I have a student who always sits on his feet. sometimes he stands. Honestly I don't mind because he pays attention and he doesn't bother anyone. The problem is the P and VP will mark me off during an observation if they see him sitting on his feet or standing.

    How would you get a kid to sit "properly" all day long?
     
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  3. Curiouscat

    Curiouscat Comrade

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    Jan 26, 2012

    Why would they mark you off?
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    That's insane! Mark you down because he's not sitting "properly"? I sit on my foot constantly...I am right now. It should be a non-issue.
     
  5. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

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    They say it is bad behavior management. Same if a kid fidgets with something like a jacket zipper or if a kid doodles. I personally doodle and fidget all the time so I don't mind if the kids do it, as long as they are absorbing the information. Some people learn better in different ways. The school is applying this Marzano approach.
     
  6. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    I don't know anything about the Marzano approach you mentioned, but it sounds torture to me. What about all the kinesthetic learners? What about people who aren't comfortable in the chairs? I have sat on one foot all my life - it doesn't have anything to do with the type of student I am. With all the things we have to worry about, this isn't a battle I am willing to fight.
     
  7. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I can understand not allowing a student to fidget as that is distracting to other students. But how is sitting on a foot an issue?
     
  8. juli233

    juli233 Companion

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    I agree w/ the others as long as he's not distracting any one or doing anything physically harmful to himself than let the kid sit that way. I have way bigger problems on my plate every day than how a kid sits!!
    but to answer your question have you tried different cusions? we have a couple that are firm and bumpy and work for some kids
     
  9. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Jan 26, 2012

    How old are your students? I tell mine that this isn't the kitchen and their feet will reach the floor. They giggle, and put them down. Many are so used to sitting on their feet at home, that it's become a habit.
     
  10. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    Jan 26, 2012

    There is no way I could sit at a desk all day long with both feet on the floor. It just isn't comfortable for me. I sort of think it is ridiculous to micromanage these kids (and you) this way.
     
  11. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jan 26, 2012

    Tell the kid that if the principal comes in the room, he has to put both feet on the floor until the principal leaves.
     
  12. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Hmmm, well, what about this, come up with a code with your foot sitting kid. Like, applesauce or touch the nose, and that's a code for him to sit properly. So, say, a P or AP walks in, you say your code. Then, when they leave, your kiddo can go back to what feels natural. I HAVE to sit criss crossed. If I am not able to, then I cross one leg over the other and just wiggle and shake my leg to my hearts content. I DEFINITELY have the case of restless leg syndrome when I can't sit criss crossed. I was at a CPR/First aid training today and I forced myself to sit normally, and wiggled all morning long. Apparently it drove my instructor crazy! :p

    So, I also try to not fight this fight too since I get it.
     
  13. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I am still thinking about this because I am VERY frustrated that your principal insists that both feet are on the floor. I have back concerns and a poorly-formed neck...I cannot imagine how much pain I would be in if I couldn't sit "my" way. Sure, the child doesn't likely have these concerns (though he could), but the idea of micromanaging to this extent is pathetic.
     
  14. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    I agree with the posters who suggest the cues for the child to shift when the admin comes in. Your admin are idiots who does not know diddly about backs, bodies, and learning. Why force a child to not be comfortable unless you have too and do it only when you have too.

    Wait, you are a student teacher aren't you? So why does it matter to you? It seems more an issue for the classroom teacher.
     
  15. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Jan 27, 2012

    Good answer Sarge.

    I once had a day care in my home, as did my neighbor. Once in a while one or the other would go over licensed numbers. If an inspector came, we would throw a kid over the fence.
     
  16. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jan 27, 2012

    I always have "standers". I just make sure, when I re-arrange they stay on the outer edges. Sometimes, after an observation, I'll think to say something to my principal, but often, I don't. They aren't playing, they are listening, actively participating, and learning. If they could do that and stand on their head - I'd go for it. Every PD where I have to sit for hours reminds me of how uncomfortable it is for my kids. If your students is actively involved in the lesson, I would tell the p and vp in the after-observation review, that is part of your behavior management. Good luck!
     
  17. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Your principal doesn't understand child development! I would never make a child sit with both feet on the floor at all times. It is a little crazy that your principal would mark you off for this "normal" child behavior. I am sure by sitting on his/her feet, getting up and down, and figgeting, it is the childs way of getting extra energy out! I know many kids that appear to not be listening because they are figgeting with something, but if you ask them a question, they know exactly what you were talking about! It is their way of getting through a day of sitting at a desk. Some kids even need to be activating both sides of their brain to learn.

    With the demands that teachers face on a daily basis, why in the world would a principal be making an issue out of this and making you worry? I sometimes wonder if the people who are writing educational codes have ever been around children.
     
  18. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Also, with kids there is such a variance in sizes for a given age, that in one class you will have kids who are too big for their desks, and others who's feet don't touch the floor.

    If the desks don't fit, the child has a right to do what's needed to be comfortable.
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    this just cracks me up!
     
  20. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Sensible or not, if your school is taking a certain approach, you have to move toward that.

    I agree with the posters who say to have the kids do what the principal wants when the principal is in the room. I would suggest you do drills to practice it. Come up with a signal, explain it, and every now and then toss the signal out so that they do what they need to do. Maybe with practice the student who sits on his feet will just naturally start to keep them on the floor more often, thus solving your problem and pleasing the principal.
     
  21. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Yes. Principal drills are very important. I do them all the time. In fact, I often post a "lookout" by the door window so we have warning if we are doing something we are not supposed to be doing (usually reading chapter books, learning science or social studies, or sounding out words that are not on the Open Court blending word list for that lesson).
     
  22. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    That's just so sad that you have to do that. I really wonder about the way that our elementary school system is heading. I'm tutoring a middle school student in math after school, and she has some BIG holes in her understanding. If I give her an algorithm, she can plug and chug all day. If I ask her why the algorithm works (say, why fractions need a common denominator to be added), she gets very confused. It's a big issue, because if she sees a problem that is not in standard form, she doesn't know what to do. I've been working with manipulatives and trying to increase her number sense, but it's slow going. She's comfortable with plug-and-chug, but not with actual thinking. I think that scripted curriculum and teaching to the test (although her test scores are really low) are causing these problems, not fixing the problems like principals would have us believe.
     
  23. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I have to admit, I hate these principal drills that many are talking about. It sends such a bad message to the children. It flat out tells them, do what you want to do when those in authority aren't around. Do you ever turn YOUR backs on your students?

    It is sneaky, deceptive and undermines the authority of the principal.
     
  24. cateste

    cateste Companion

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    what about the parents?

    If you get along well with the parents and they don't mind their child sitting on his feet, have them write a letter thanking the principal for allowing their child to learn in the best way he can. Difficult to write you up when the parents are on your side.
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    OMG...that is so funny!
     
  26. bdsweetie

    bdsweetie Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2012

    I have a kid that does that as well but I've never heard of being counted off for it. It doesn't really bother anyone and that's what makes him comfortable. I would agree with asking him to make sure he sits on him bottom if anyone else in the room to show his best manners. When the visitors leave he can sit on his feet if that makes him comfortable.
     
  27. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Jan 29, 2012

    Our observations are scheduled. So if yours is scheduled just have an activity where the children aren't sitting on the floor so much. I don't think a principal will care if the child sits on his shoes, during an observation. The principal is suppose to be observing the quality of your lesson, not if you can get your children to act like robots. Some boys need a bit of "wiggle" room. Adjusting to these differences shows superior teaching. I'd be more concerned about putting together an outstanding lesson for the children than trying to control them. I wouldn't stop this child from sitting on his shoes. You may let the principal know ahead of time that this seems to work out better by allowing him to sit on his shoes. It should be a classroom of learning, not a classroom where he is posing for a picture.
     
  28. jessiiteach

    jessiiteach Companion

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    I was. Got lucky and filled a sudden opening at the same school!
     
  29. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    :yeahthat:

    I had kids who'd rock back and forth during carpet time, sit on their hands, or wiggle around. As far as I was concerned, if they weren't bothering me or anyone else around, it was a non-issue.

    I totally agree with ReadingRules12, though! :thumb:
     

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