"just close the door and teach it your way"

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Aliceacc, Aug 13, 2010.

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  1. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Direct Instruction, capitalized, is a scripted program. When you use the term "direct instruction," many people associate it with that program. That was the source of the confusion.
     
  2. TiffanyL

    TiffanyL Cohort

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    Aug 14, 2010

    Thank you, MissCelia! I was wondering why the poster wrote it with the word "Capital" in front of it.

    That makes much more sense. :)
     
  3. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 15, 2010

    I took Alice's original post as directed to many of the newer teachers who are just now finding out that the things they teach you in college are not what really happens in the classroom....and feeling that the way they were taught is "better"....not realizing that, when you take a job, you are agreeing to teach in the way that the school (and district) has adopted, so go to it and stop complaining.

    If you strongly believe in a certain method or curriculum or whatever, advocate for it. Or seek out jobs (private schools, charters, magnets) that use that method. Seek small ways to bring the best of that method into your classroom without ignoring or debasing the curriculum that you are entrusted to teach.

    The attitiude I've gotten from some posts recently is that you sit through training, take the information with a grain of salt, and then ignore it when you get your classroom and do what you want anyway. "Close the door and no one will know." I think that's what Alice is trying to address. It's your responsiblility, once you accept a job, to try to implement the curriculum you are assigned. Period.

    My hope is that good principals (like mine, thank goodness) do care about curriculum and content, but also care about creativity, and they want you get the point across to the kids in any way possible. I know that's not always the case, but in a school, a teacher is not "in charge" and sometimes we just have to bend to the will of the board of ed, the principal, the supt, even the parents. We're on a team.
     
  4. SunnyGal

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    Aug 15, 2010

    Actually, I thought this post started because of another post about taking away centers. Someone asked what everyone would do if they were told they couldn't use centers in their classrooms anymore, and a poster said something to the effect of they would close their door and do them anyway.

    I also don't think it's fair to say that it's only younger teachers who want to go against the grain and do that they want. When I first started teaching, I did whatever I was told by my administration for fear of getting in trouble. Our school has gone through many changes recently, especially with regards to technology, and our older teachers are the ones who are resisting. When we changed email programs, there was a teacher who had been there for 20+ years who refused to check his email. Needless to say, he got in trouble a lot for missing meetings. When we got electronic grade books, some teachers refused to use them and stuck to their hard copies. At the end of the year, we all had to wait on those teachers to enter their grades in the computer. When we got Promethean Boards, teachers decided to use them as overhead projector screens instead of at least trying them out.

    Yes, I agree that sometimes younger teachers come in with the attitude that they can do whatever they want in the classroom, but I think you'll also find resistance with seasoned teachers when big changes start taking place. They're set in their ways and like their systems because they know what works for them, and it's hard for to do something totally different than what they've been doing for so long.
     
  5. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    I posted some examples of DI- from You Tube. I believe DI started as DISTAR (which I am not sure of what the acronym is, but started around the 1960's). Pretty sure it is one of the oldest scripted programs around. They have curriculum for every subject by now I think. I've seen language, reading, writing, spelling and math. I am not totally against it- I just think you have to look at the way you use it. Like I said, I've seen it work REALLY well for SOME students with LD or EMH or Autism in SMALL GROUPS, but many schools use it for everyone and it just makes me want to cringe.
     
  6. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I worked in a school that used the reading program for an hour a day. Each student went to a group on their level. Groups had no more than 10-12 students. It was the very first thing in the morning. After that, we taught our state's approved curriculum using best practices (centers, guided reading, etc.) It really helped the students to have that hour at their own level, and they still got the "normal" instruction they would usually get.
     
  7. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Aug 15, 2010

    But, DI is a reading intervention program. I have never seen it used with a population that was not struggling or behind in reading. There is research behind it supporting its use. However I don't think when others are talking about scripted currics. in this thread, they are talking about DI.
     
  8. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Many schools in Florida, Wisconsin, and Texas use it whole school all day for all students. It is not just reading intervention. There is reading, spelling, language, math. I'm saying I don't have a problem with it being used for struggling readers, but I do have a problem when it is used inappropriately. I worked in a school used it for the entire school and the older kids that were advanced readers were BORED. It was good for the struggling students in small groups.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 15, 2010

    I wasn't targeting new teachers.

    The advice is being given by seasoned teachers, not other newbies.
     
  10. TiffanyL

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    Aug 15, 2010

    Thanks for that info! I think we are talking about two completely different things so that makes more sense now.
     
  11. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 15, 2010

    I also wasn't targeting new teachers. I know I said "when you take a job," but I didn't mean only that first year you take the job...or first two or three. Changes happen ALL the time, and each year over my 18 year career, I've had to make a deliberate choice about whether I ws returning to that classroom, to that grade, to that school. Each year, I've essentially chosen to commit to my job - or not. When I mentioned finding a job that suited your philosophy and/or methods, I wasn't only thinking about that first job out of college - I've been tempted multiple times in the past couple of years to find a more play-oriented PreK program (it wouldn't be in the public schools), but in the end, each year, I've decided to put my all into a job. And the trainings I mentioned also aren't limited to first-year teachers - that was actually aimed more at those older, resistant teachers that you mentioned. But, it's part of the job, and they've chosen to return for another year, so they've chosen to accept the changes, sit through those trainings and then implement them. If they don't, they're not doing their job.
     
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