Just a vent.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by txagteach, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. txagteach

    txagteach Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2012

    I'm the new girl on my team. My team mates are nice enough to my face, but neither are very good communicators--I rarely have a clue what they are talking about, they don't fill me in on how things work at the school, don't answer my emails when I ask them questions, etc.

    We also have split up the planning, which is a help and a hindrance. They each have a subject they plan--1 teacher plans a subject that our district requires 45 minutes of instruction time per day, the other plans a subject that our district requires 90 minutes of instruction per day. My subject? 155 minutes per day. I get little to no feedback on my plans from them. Heck, I don't even know if they are actually doing the activities that I plan! I spend a good 45 minutes-hour per lesson then I still have to gather materials, make copies for them, etc.

    Oh, and after school duties? Let's just say those aren't evenly distributed either--1 is finished with her duty in about 5 minutes, the other is done in 10. Mine? 20-25 minutes.

    I get that being new means getting some of the grunt work, but geesh--I know that whenever I've had new team members, I've gone out of my way to find out how I can help them, make sure they know what to expect, give them feedback on their plans, etc.

    I'm not a new teacher, but I am new to this district and things are very different. I almost DO feel like a new teacher! And, it stinks to not really feel valued as a member of the team.

    Thanks for letting me vent. :)
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Sep 26, 2012

    I understand. :(

    Hopefully things will become more comfortable as time passes and you learnmore about your "teammates" and expectations. Then you perhaps address some of these concerns.
     
  4. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Sep 26, 2012

    That is odd. I am used to the opposite where new teachers are purposefully given less after school work and less team work. Every place I have worked it is taken into consideration that just being new to teaching is a huge amount of extra work.
     
  5. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

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    Sep 27, 2012

    I'm so sorry you feel this way.

    I don't really have any advice, but I was in your shoes last year. I wasn't a new teacher, but new to the district and one of the teachers I had to work pretty closely with was very difficult to work with. I even went home one day in tears because she ripped my head off for asking her a question.

    I'm in my second year at this school now, and I can say, it does get better. This teacher leaves me alone and finally treats me like one of her equals and not just some new person who doesn't know what the heck is going on.

    I'm hoping things will work out for you, also! :)
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2012

    :hugs: We always switched up duties so no one would be stuck with the longer duties for the entire year.
     

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