Job search update, new lead. Long term sub?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Anonymous Barbie, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Anonymous Barbie

    Anonymous Barbie Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2019

    Thank you to those who weighed in when I was considering resigning my position. Your input helped me come to the decision I needed... so I resigned. It has been a hard couple of days. Emotions are high. I did come to love my coworkers, and familiarity is comforting. But ultimately I’m ready to be done with the place. The day after I gave notice, they fired an employee without warning. Better to get out now!

    That brings us to now. I was content to go to the sub in-service day in 2 weeks, and work on new certifications. I saw a posting today, however, in my subject area, meant to last the whole first semester. It will be FTE, so not technically subbing, no matter where they start me out pay-wise, I’ll be making much more than I would’ve as a sub.

    I just wanted to get a quick question or two out there about how many people have had temporary, one-semester positions turn into permanent positions.

    I don’t know the nature of why this is one semester. Illness most likely.

    With the position also starting up on the 26th, and the posting just went up a day or two ago, would you imagine that they’re in a crunch to find someone to cover in such short notice? Especially someone who already lives in this rural area, with the certification and experience, who’s willing to take only one semester?

    Can this be a good way to get my name out in the district? And maybe let admins know that I’m willing to work on adding new certifications?
     
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  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Companion

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    Aug 10, 2019

    OMGoodness! Good for you in getting away from that other job! It sounded like a horrible place to be. It is just amazing how other opportunities can pop up after you let go of a bad one.
    I come from a district like yours. It is very hard to get into. They do not seem to ever hire day to day subs, but we got a new teacher (who I love).
    The way she got the new job was by doing an emergency long term full time sub job for half a yr.
    She worked her butt off while doing the FT sub job. She was careful to keep on good terms with students, parents, and staff. ( Not always easy, but she did it!)
    IDK how she did it, but she was able to keep those kids out of the office. ( They were a tough group.) I think she told herself, "This is set amount of time and I will throw myself into it." She did all of the extras too. When that teacher did not return, Boom! She had the job. Of course, they did interviews, but since she had been with those kids and successful, she got it the next years too. Just imo, that is an excellent way to get in the door and stay!
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2019

    I would go for it. It does sound like a great way to get your foot in the door. If the teacher returns, then you wouldn’t get the job, but it otherwise sounds like you have a good chance.

    I was hired in January once to finish out the year on a 1-year contract (meaning the one school year that was already in session, not a full calendar year after being hired). I got to interview again for the same position in March, and the job was then permanently nine, starting the following school year. I just considered the first two months to be one long interview. If they hadn’t liked the job I was doing, I assume that I wouldn’t have been rehired.
     
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  5. Anonymous Barbie

    Anonymous Barbie Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 4:00 PM

    Update!!!

    Apparently the position is now a one-year position. It's not clear why, or if there's any potential for it to be a permanent placement. I have yet to be called for an interview, but they haven't called anyone yet apparently. But the job starts in 10 days, so I anticipate they'll be calling for interviews today.

    Anyway, my concern here is that this is probably just a one-year position. I know that depending on the district, teachers can take one year of unpaid leave, and still have a job to come back to.

    If I get the position, and it's only for the one year, I'm going to have a hard time feeling good about my posting. I will be frugal and save up, just in case there isn't anything for me next year, but has anyone ever taken a job like this? How do you avoid being bummed out, even though you technically have the job?
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 4:16 PM

    I don't understand your attitude. If you get a job for a year, it's highly likely that during that year you will have benefits and a decent salary. You can't control when the permanent teacher returns in a year, but you can work very hard to acquire experience and earn some really good letters of reference from a great district. Many would love to have that job for a single semester, so having it for a year seems like a true gift. There are never guarantees. I've known people who were hired, thinking they would have a job long term, only to not end up being a good fit, and being non-renewed at the end of the school year. If you can't feel good about getting a solid year's salary and experience, well, keep looking. Someone else will appreciate the job for the experience that this job is.
     
  7. Anonymous Barbie

    Anonymous Barbie Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 4:27 PM

    Bills, my friend. Bills. It's human to want a little bit more secure footing at a job.

    And the fact that it took three years for a position in my field to open up up here, to essentially be told it's not going to be there for me when I'm done with my year.

    Yes, I will be happy for the salary. I will be happy to get my foot in the door. But psychologically, it's very defeating to have not been able to teach in a public school for three years because turnover is low.

    I don't understand what you don't get about me feeling a little sad that it's only one year. I know there are no guarantees in permanent positions, but at least it's not a "no" right off the bat. I spent 6 years getting two degrees so I could teach what I'm passionate about. I just want to teach. And I'm struggling to do that here.
     
  8. Anonymous Barbie

    Anonymous Barbie Rookie

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 4:46 PM

    I'll just end by saying that if I'm lucky enough to get this job, I'll try to use this year to do a bang-up job. Get myself some credibility in the district, and maybe that will open some doors for me. Anything can happen with that teacher's year of unpaid leave, but in the event it doesn't work out, I'll have some backup plans. Working on other certification areas to diversify myself. Adapt or die, I guess.

    I taught for two years outside of my subject area. I can do just about anything I set my mind to.

    I am just really feeling down on myself.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 7:06 PM

    Fix that, first. It drains you of energy, colors everything with an overcast of pessimism. Even when outcomes don't end the way we want, you never know who or how you will impress those who cross your path. I find that those who share their down feelings about themselves are kind of fishing for quick compliments, but in reality, it draws in the people who are naysayers, pessimistic in their leanings. Just food for thought . . .
     
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  10. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Companion

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    Aug 16, 2019 at 9:09 PM

    Take it 1 step at a time. Be thankful for the year of experience. I just had this conversation with someone today. The person was complaining ( kind of harping) about what I will have to deal with NEXT year.
    This year has barely started. She has no clue I am not going to be there next year....lol
     
  11. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 17, 2019 at 8:32 AM

    I agree with vickilyn. A one-year position is nothing to feel bad about, especially when you're coming from not having a permanent position. In my area, anyone hired after school lets out for summer break would be on a one-year-only contract, even if the position will still be available for the following school year. The school's reasoning is that, the "best" teachers have probably already been hired because it's late in the hiring season. They want an opportunity to interview the "best" teachers the following year, earlier in the hiring season. If the person on the one-year contract ended up being a great fit for the position, they would have really good shot at being hired back for the same position on a permanent contract.

    I already mentioned that this happened to me when I took a job in January, and it also happened to my friend who was hired in late July. We were both on one-year contracts for positions that were going to be available again the next school year. The district just didn't want to commit to hiring us back until they could gauge our performance against the "best" competition. In the end, we both did our jobs well and both got hired back on permanent contracts for the following school year. On the other hand, someone in my new district was hired on a one-year contract last school year because she got hired over the summer, when all of the "best" candidates had already secured other jobs. She was out sick all the time and didn't do so well when she was there. They used the one-year contract as an easy way to get out of hiring her back.

    If another teacher did take a leave and then chooses to return, as long as you do a great job in this position, you can be assured that either the district will give you a great recommendation or they'll hire you for another role they have open. They may even allow you to keep this role and put the returning teacher in another role, as a leave of absence usually only secures a position in the district, not necessarily the same position. And, there's also a good chance that the teacher plans to return but won't. I've known a few teachers who took a leave and then decided to forfeit their position after the year was up.

    The moral of this post is this: Don't be bummed out that you are on a one-year contract. It's reasonable for the district to use a one-year contract this close to the beginning of the school year. Treat this opportunity as a gift to prove your worth. Do the best you can, and then you may find that this job is yours again next year - permanently.
     
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  12. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Aug 17, 2019 at 12:24 PM

    I know it's a little different for you because you're actually certified/qualified to teach and need something full-time for the salary & benefits, but I actually quit full-time teaching to sub & work part-time. I ended up picking up a long-term gig and ever since then, I've been filling year-long vacancies (so it's pretty much the same as teaching full-time but without the benefits lol , sadly though, I get paid MORE as a LTS than I did as a full-time teacher. And I don't need the benefits because of my husband). I don't seek out these vacancies, btw. The principals hear about me and seek me out. I know if I wanted to work full-time, I'd have a full-time teaching position (our district has a severe shortage. The school year has already started and there are 100+ vacancies currently (this number does include administration, custodial, cafeteria, etc. but also many teaching positions))
    So you never know. If you end up filling this year-long position and are awesome at it, they might ask you to fill another position full-time or recommend you to another principal or if the position stays open, you'd get it. Either way, you have a good chance of getting something permanent after this!
     
  13. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Aug 17, 2019 at 2:47 PM

    I did a one year leave, and when the teacher returned she was given a new position. I’m still in her original position. That was 25 years ago.
     
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  14. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Aug 18, 2019 at 9:59 PM

    To OP, here's hoping that you will earn an interview. Just curious - what degrees and certifications do you currently have, and what would you want to add?
     

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