Job Offer - Should I take it?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by SCTeacher23, Jul 13, 2015.

  1. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2015

    Last week, I went on 3 interviews. 2 were permanent full time positions, but 1 was for a full year maternity leave. Well, I did not get either of the permanent positions, but I was just offered the full year maternity leave. I am very conflicted and need advice.

    Right now, I have been working at a charter school for the past 2 years. There are some good things about it and it has been good to get experience, but there are a lot of things I do not like about it. There are a lot of thing that they do that are very different than the public schools.

    I am so conflicted because I absolutely LOVED the school I received an offer at. I really felt a connection with the principal and the team of teachers that I met. The principal told me that although it is a full year maternity leave there is a very good chance of it turning into a tenure track position and he said he felt I would bring a lot to the team. He basically said he couldn't guarantee it turning into a tenure track, but there was a very strong possibility.

    I am so conflicted because I feel like this could be my "foot in the door" of the district and I ultimately want to get back into a public school that I feel like is aligned to my teaching philosophies. I feel like it is difficult -especially in NJ - to just land a full time teaching position as it is. But, it is possible that at the end of the year I could be left without a job.

    So would you take the position? Or stay at your current position?
     
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  3. Jess93

    Jess93 Rookie

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    Jul 13, 2015

    If this is your dream district/school, jump on it. Filling a year leave is no different than a permanent position in terms of having your own classroom. Most teachers who take a year leave often do no return. Whatever the case, this is good experience to put on your resume, and you most likely will get hired permanently next school year. Hiring one years is less risky for school's and they are able to see if you are a true fit before investing. Show what you got and DO IT! This is a test:)
     
  4. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    I agree -- it sounds like you really like the school and the people you'd be working with, and you'd still be the full time teacher for the year. Take the job. At the end of the year it either leads to a full time position or you have a new thing to add to your resume with new skills and experiences. :)
     
  5. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 13, 2015

    If you stay at your current job, would you be job hunting again next summer? How do you think your year will go? Will you be happy or miserable? If you would be unhappy and definitely job searching again, I would take the one year. It can't be any worse, and has a higher chance of being a better fit. If the position doesn't turn into tenure track, you have more references and more connections.
     
  6. Stlteach89

    Stlteach89 Rookie

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    Knowing that you fit into and feel comfortable with the school is important. I would take it if you're already that happy at the school.
     
  7. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Jul 13, 2015

    I would take it. If you make a good impression, this may give you a foot in the door even if this position only lasts for a year.
     
  8. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    Jul 13, 2015

    I would take it. You impressed the P and he has confidence in you. If you continue to impress him throughout the year, you never know - what if the maternity leave position turns into a full time position? What if another teacher has a change in circumstance and has to switch schools/quit/etc.? You may get shuffled into that position because you're already there and proved yourself.
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2015

    This. :thumb:
     
  10. msrosie

    msrosie Rookie

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    I think you should take it! Maternity positions are a great way to make connections with teachers and principals and prove yourself.
     
  11. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2015

    Thanks for all the input. I am really leaning towards taking it, but I still am trying to weigh out all my options. I spoke to the P and got all of the information including salary and benefits and told him that I was very very interested but needed to talk about it with my husband before making a final decision. He said he completely understood but asked if he could call my references. I asked him if he could just wait because I did not want my current supervisor contacted until I discussed with my husband (because I don't want to jeopardize my current position without being 100% sure - especially since I have an "at will" contract). He said that was no problem but then I had trouble getting a hold of my husband today at work. I called the P back and told him that I am extremely interested but couldn't get a hold of my husband and was hoping he could call all my references except for my current supervisor until tomorrow. He said that was fine and that he had a workshop that he is going to be in all day tomorrow and won't be back in the building until Wednesday. He just said he'd hold off on calling all of my references once I talk to my husband on Wednesday when he is back in the building. He didn't seem to have a problem about it but do you think this is ok? I don't want to come across as uninterested in the position, but I do need to have a conversation with my husband before I take a new position.
     
  12. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jul 13, 2015

    I probably wouldn't have done that, but that doesn't matter now-it's in the past. Talk it over with your spouse, make your decision, and let the P know asap.

    Look at it this way-you can be unhappy all year and look for a job next summer, or be happy all year and maybe look for a job next summer. Life is too short to spend so much time miserable.
     
  13. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Just out of curiosity what would you have done? I don't think I could accept any position anywhere without talking to my husband. I was somewhat leaning towards telling him to call my references, but then if he did, and decided not to take the position, that I would have been jeopardizing my current position.
     
  14. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    It's a tough position to be in, and you probably did what you could, but I just always feel weird about asking a P to wait or do something different, like not call that one reference. It's probably fine, don't worry. I'd like to think that I would have already had a plan, as in 'if I'm offered this job I'm going to take it' kind of plan...but that isn't always possible.

    Just don't stress about it. Talk it over, call back asap...and if it were me, I'd take the job.
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    You are in a job you don't like, but you have the chance to be in a job you love, or might love, for a year. I was there once, and I took the job. Absolutely no regrets. The district kept me when the teacher wasn't ready to come back after a year. It was probably the best move I ever made. I learned more teaching in a well run, state of the art school than I could have learned with a forever job in a mediocre school. I still use skills perfected from that job, and although I now teach elsewhere, I would not have thought twice about accepting the offer. Furthermore, I would let them call my references, especially if not overly happy where I am. I am considering a new job myself, and the only reason they haven't called my current employer has more to do with us having to submit copies of our evaluations.

    When I got the job that was supposed to be only a year, my husband knew that if it was offered, I would take it, only briefly considering pay, because it was exactly what I was looking for other than the time limit thing. When our son was looking, I told him a year's experience at a great school would never hurt him - you are known by the company you keep and the company that hires you.

    Unless you enjoy job hunting, it seems like such a no-brainer. Worst case scenario: at the end of the year, there are no jobs to move you into, but you walk away with a handful of great references, a principal who wishes he could keep you, so is an ally in helping you find a new job, colleagues who are rooting for you, and, unemployment while you search, since you did nothing wrong in losing the job.

    I know that there are charters that are good, but I haven't run into any of them. If you want to teach public school, you need to leave the nest of this job that is familiar and reach for the unknown. I haven't worked for a charter, and I wouldn't even let my son put in an application for one. They might be getting a bad reputation just because we don't understand them, but my reasoning had much more to do with the lack of a union.

    I would take the job, change my mindset from foot in the door to real chance to be a public school teacher, and not worry if it ended up being with this school, or another like it down the line. Let me say again, walking away with the letters of recommendation and the gratitude of a great school will take you much further than if you stay where you are now.

    As for husbands - if he doesn't know the score as the game is being played, then he doesn't get a say. My husband, as I came home after securing my present job, "Let me guess, they offered and you accepted? If it will make you happy, I am happy." I've had a lot of time to train mine! I'm all for wedded bliss and partnership, but if he had missed the signs that I would indeed take the job if offered, that would have been his mistake, not mine. His take is that I'm the one who has to work there and I know as much, or more, about the salary and what that means to our family.

    You do know that you could have been offered the tenure track and then just not worked out, don't you? In that case, you would still be looking for a job, but probably not with glowing recommendations. You could stay with the job you have, but being hired at will does not inspire confidence for me. Just something to consider - there are no guarantees, actually, with anything.

    Yes, I would take the job, pack my bags, give mandatory notice, and get on with my life. I don't second guess myself on tests or in life situations, and it has served me well. I used to think a situation to death, seeing all possibilities. Then one day I realized I was no better off than if I just accepted at face value and let the game play out. There have been a couple of stumbles, but it is life we are talking about, after all.

    Hope you can come to a decision you are comfortable with sooner rather than later, though, since these positions, in NJ, don't usually go vacant for long.
     
  16. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Will you get full salary/benefits or only be payed as a long term sub? That would make the decision for me. I definitely wouldn't work a full time job all year for sub pay (I feel like that's what they'd try to pull around here). If you're receiving a full salary, I would absolutely take the job. Even if the teacher you're replacing comes back the next year, if there are any other openings in the building you'd be the first pick for those. Even if there are no openings in that specific building, you'd still have a huge advantage applying to other openings in the district. As long as you do a good job in this position, I really think you can almost guarantee turning it into a permanent thing.
     
  17. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2015

    Vickilyn, thank you for that. That really helped me and everything you said really made sense. And waterfall, yes - it is regular salary, full benefits.

    I am going to take it. :)

    I mentioned earlier that the P is going to be out tomorrow but said to leave a voicemail. Should I follow up with an e-mail as well?

    Also, I am still under contract with my charter school but it is "at will" and I know I can get out of it. But as others have said, things do fall through so I don't want to resign quite yet. The P said that I'd be making an appointment with him and the Superintendent to go over the contract and receive the official offer from the Super. Should I wait until I sign the contract with them? (or can I not do that since I'm still technically under contract) Or tell my current P once I just have the appointment set up with the new district?
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2015

    I love technology, but know it can go astray. Leave the voicemail and send an email.

    Not sure about having a contract but being at will. If you have a contract to read, you might want to go over it well to see what your obligations are. Most schools require 60 days, but not all. Some will bend the rules, most will let you go if a suitable replacement is found in time. As long as I was certain of what they needed, I would wait for the official offer, which usually comes from HR.

    Good luck and welcome aboard - I think you will love public schools!
     
  19. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jul 14, 2015

    This is what I was trying to say! :)
     

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