Job ideas for a student with a severe disability

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Bangert, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. Bangert

    Bangert New Member

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    Jan 4, 2011

    I have a student that is 18 and his parents desperately want him to have a work skill so he can get a job. He is legally blind, has an aversion to touch and therefore refuses to hold anything, and he will not do any one task for more than a few seconds. Does anyone have any ideas of work skills we could work on? We've tried sorting tasks, but he won't look at them. We've tried cleaning, but he won't hold anything. The one thing he does enjoy doing is hitting a switch, but he'll only do it a few times before he either walks away or throws the switch on the floor.

    Any ideas??
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jan 4, 2011

    Bangert, how frustrating that must be for the parents. I can't think of anything that he could do, but hopefully you'll get some good ideas from the great people here. Good luck!
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jan 4, 2011

    Perhaps you can talk to your state voc rehab agency (well actually commission of the blind in this student's case) and see what they think? Perhaps a shelthered workshop may be best for this student.
     
  5. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Jan 4, 2011

    hmmmm.....

    Just some ideas and thoughts:

    *can you mount a switch so that he can't throw it? and use a schedule and or cue so that he knows that his reward and or break is coming next?
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 4, 2011

    He's blind and has an aversion to touch, but he's mentally sound, right??

    Could he do something along the lines of a DJ? (Could he read text if it were in Braille?) If so, could he be a reader for a Books on Tape kind of thing?
     
  7. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Jan 4, 2011

    Is he verbal? Is there anything that he will touch?
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jan 4, 2011

    What I would say is to get some sound programming in place (now!) to work on the touch aversion. That is going to significantly limit him in the area of vocational skills.

    Is he motivated by anything? Does like he like to work for certain reinforcers?

    Can you have a program in place where he works for X minutes and earns X? Slowly increasing the work time?

    Even being able to work for 15 minute increments would serve to be successful in a sheltered work setting.

    For someone who throws switches, won't touch things, and is blind, it will be very difficult to move towards independent AND semi-supported living. I imagine that this is why you are seeking suggestions!

    But really, I do think that working on those core skills (independent work, reducing the touch aversion, etc.) instead of focusing on a specific "job" he could have - would be very helpful for expanding his options.

    If you need suggestions on how to get this kind of programming in place (I am speaking of writing a specific plan for systematically introducing new skills and increasing tolerance for sorting, switch, etc.) - let me know and I might be able to give you suggestions and tips on how to get that in place.

    I am working with a middle school student with profound autism. He has VERY few skills. We are trying to teach him to sort with no luck. He can sort two forks and two spoons into a silverware tray, and that is after four months of training.

    Right now, I have written a program for him to learn to "follow an independent work schedule." We taught him color matching (Which was also a long process, and after four months, he is able to match 4x6 cards of yellow, red, or blue). We will use the color matching to our advantage and he will have three cards in order on his desk. He will have to pull the first card off and match it to a box that has a task in it (a lot of them are "Put in" or "take out" tasks, but they are things he knows how to do...very simple).

    I have written the plan so systematically. It introduces each skill in a tiny little segment (broken down) - very discrete trial-ish.

    Would be glad to share with others if you are interested.
     
  9. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jan 4, 2011

    I am always interested in acquiring any knowledge you have.

    I have a lot to teacheresk things in place in my classroom.
     
  10. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Can he read large print and if so, for how long? "Legally blind" describes a very large range of vision, so depending on how much vision he has, he may be able to use his vision for a job with the proper accommodations.
     
  11. Lindager

    Lindager Companion

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    Jan 16, 2011

    Does he like to talk to people? A friend of my DD was legally blind, but she liked talking to people she became a greeter at Walmart.
     

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