Is this a school??

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by becky, Apr 20, 2005.

  1. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    Even though I plan to homeschool I've been looking into private schools also, just to see what's out there.

    I'm finding schools where the teachers aren't even close to being certified. They are simply people who do the work of teachers without the training.
    They are probably no less committed or skilled, but for all the tuition being asked, it seems strange.
     
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  3. kteachdc

    kteachdc Rookie

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    run!

    I unfortunately worked in an atmosphere with many uncertified, untrained teachers and it was a nightmare. They have good intentions, but without child development knowledge and training, they have no clue how to discipline and what methods to use to "teach". Things become very frustrating for the kids, who are usually expected to sit for long periods and behave in ways they are not developmentally capable of, or are allowed to run wild with no consequences or supervision (I've seen both). Basically, teachers can be good with no formal training, but I know I'd rather work with a trained and certified teacher because they have the same background info I do and generally know how to be appropriate with the kids.
     
  4. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    I applied at a couple private schools before I got this job, and yes, you don't have to be certified to teach at a private school. I applied at a Friends school and had a friend who worked at a Catholic school--both schools has teachers working with no certification. Some did, some didn't. I also worked at a private (chain) preschool with a Kindergarten and the K teacher was not certified. She didn't even have 60 college credits to sub. I thought she was a pretty good teacher, but, in my opinion, if public school is free, why wouldn't you send your child where the certified teachers were?
     
  5. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 20, 2005

    I've attended Catholic schools growing up, even public ones, and I ultimately ended up graduating from a Baptist high school.

    Yes. You don't need to be certified to work at a private school. That's because private schools receive no federal and no state funding. Therefore, they aren't bound by the same standards as public schools since they receive no federal and state funding. They rely solely on the tuition to function and get by in addition to using the tuition to pay for the teachers and administration staff.

    Many private schools are typically run by religious groups. Catholics run Catholic schools, Baptists run Baptist schools, Lutherans run Lutheran schools, Jews run Jewish schools, Muslims run Islamic schools, etc... so that their children can attend a school where they can not only receive the education students would typically receive in a public school BUT also receive religious instruction in the faith they're being brought up in.

    However, religion only plays one part in the choosing of a private school. Many people choose a private school because class sizes are smaller than public schools (usually about half the size or less) thereby giving far more individualized attention to each student than what typically would've been given at a public school. For many kids, the small class size and increased individualized attention is more beneficial than hurtful and will prepare them just as well or better for higher education.

    Another factor that plays a crutial role in choosing a private school is safety. Kids are actually far more safe in the private schools than they are in the public schools. Teachers and Administrators in private schools can clamp down tighter on such things like drugs and actually keep them out better because they can actually engage in corporal punishment with the students and not have to worry about "abusing" a child since the parents have no problems with it due to their religious beliefs and such. Not to mention, because a tuition is being paid into the education that gives the private school administrators greater leeway when it comes to getting rid of "problematic" and "unddesireable" kids who don't care to really learn anything by kicking them out faster than they can blink so that the other kids may get a peaceful and safe education all around that can't otherwise be attained in a public school since troublemakers there are harder to get rid of due to the education being FREE and FOR EVERYONE.

    There really is nothing wrong with a private school and people have their various decisions for sending their kids to one. I suppose those who send their kids to a private school wonder why people would actually send their kids to a public school rather than a private one given all the problems that exist in public schools which don't exist in the private ones.
     
  6. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    I was seeking a Montessori preschool for my own two kids about 6 years ago and visited several that would be on my way to work and each had something profoundly different that disturbed me. It may be something YOU didnt notice, because I knew what I wanted to see or DIDNT want to see.
    When we all go into someones classroom, I guarantee, we each will leave there and describe what we saw= which may be totally different then each other's description. I love to go into these schools to see whats out there also! I think its great Becky that you do that.
     
  7. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    I work in a Catholic school and we all are certified to teach I think except the nuns who work there aren't (only a few). Many private schools in my area the teachers are certified just depends on the school and the adminstrators.
     
  8. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    In my area the parochial schools usually have much larger classes in elementary than the public schools do. Most of the parochial classes run about 32 students, and I have 22 students and that is the largest class in my building.
     
  9. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    In my area the Catholic schools have smaller classes than the public. I guess different every where
     
  10. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 22, 2005

    Catholic schools in Northeastern Illinois also have smaller classes over their public school counterparts.

    So, I agree with AMK. It probably depends on the area.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Having taught in both private and public and having a best friend who homeschools:
    Yes there are private schools that do not require a teaching certificate- however many teachers in private schools are GREAT teachers.....(and some are not)
    In public schools you must be certified- there are alternate routes to certification in many states that will allow a non-education major with a college degree in another area to teach with certain provisions- check your state guidelines for more information...Again some teachers in public schools are GREAT and some are not.....
    Homeschooling does not require teaching certification and again some people are GREAT at it and some are not......

    As a parent I have always done my research regarding local schools and try to stay on top of what is going on in my children's classrooms. When I have had a question about curriculum, pedagogy, teacher style, etc, I have asked...and persisted to come to an acceptable situation when things are not working......

    As a teacher, I value those who are PROFESSIONALS....by that I mean taking yourself seriously as an educator, being a reflective practitioner, and doing the best for those you teach every day. I have encountered such professionals in private, public, and homeschool settings. We should ask no less for our kids- whether our own or the ones we teach.....
     
  12. marydoll

    marydoll Rookie

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    I agree with czacza, I enjoy working with professionals, gaining as much information as possible will enable you to find out the improtant factors and give you piece of mind. Some people are cut out to teach and some are not. I choose to send my children to a school with teachers who are able to work through the curriculum and deliver it in a professional way.

    mary
     
  13. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    You know, I wasn't knocking these uncertified teachers. I was just surprised to find out that they weren't certified.
    I'm also very surprised at some of the different rules I'm seeing at each school.
    I looked into a Christian school that had a super strict dress code. I don't dress my daughter anywhere near immodest, but her current wardrobe wouldn't pass their standard. Her dresses come mid -knee, and they want knees covered.
    She's been too long under the bad influence of her 18 year old brother to attend that school, anyway!!
     
  14. lowrie

    lowrie Companion

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    I find this thread fascinating. I live in Manitoba,Canada and here you must be certified to teach or substitute. Without a Bachelor of Education degree you cannot teach or substitute teach in a school, public or private.

    While I appreciate there are some natural born teachers, I also think there are things I wouldn't know how to do if I wasn't working on my B.Ed. degree. I have come to this career change later in life than lots of people enter the profession, and I honestly felt I could do the job without the degree, however, now that I'm halfway through it, I realize that there are things I am learning that I wouldn't have had in my repetoire if I didn't enter the B.Ed. program.

    Interesting discussion, in any event. Are substitute teachers paid that much less than certified teachers where you live?

    Erin
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    sub teachers get about 75-80 dollars a day.

    Certified teachers- depends on salary scale/school district but around here you'd be hard pressed to find a district that starts a teacher at less than 35,000/year.
     
  16. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 23, 2005

    It depends on the area you're subbing in. I've noticed subs on the east coast get paid a lot less a day than I do and I noticed that sub teachers on the west coast get paid a lot more than I do.

    As a multiple district sub, I get paid an average of $95 per full-day. :)

    In regards to regular teachers, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says that the median annual earnings of kindergarten, elementary, middle, and secondary school teachers ranged from $39,810 to $44,340 in 2002; the lowest 10 percent earned $24,960 to $29,850; the top 10 percent earned $62,890 to $68,530.
     
  17. mmeblue

    mmeblue Rookie

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    How can you say "I wasn't knocking these uncertified teachers" when the title of your thread is "Is this a school??" I'm sorry, but the thread title would seem to indicate that you consider an uncertified teacher to be something other than a teacher, since you're not sure whether that person's place of employment qualifies as a school or not. To me, that seems like "knocking."

    Lack of certification does not necessarily imply lack of qualification.
     
  18. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 23, 2005

    Well put mmeblue! :)

    I've gotten the impression from this thread that private schools don't hold a candle to public schools simply because they allow uncertified teachers to teach there who couldn't possibly know what they're doing since they lack certification. And, well, that's just BS IMHO and to be honest, I've had uncertified teachers at private schools know far better as to what they're doing than some of their ceritifed counterparts in public schools.
     
  19. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Elizabeth, your comments are quite refreshing. I can relate to you.
     
  20. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 23, 2005

    Thanks Grammy Teacher! :)
     
  21. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    In my first post to this thread, I stated that, "I thought she was a pretty good teacher" regarding a Kindergarten teacher I worked with in the past who was not certified, and not even close to being certified. My point was that I feel more reassured knowing that a teacher had to go through and pass a training program, had to pass a test, and had to sucessfully complete a year of teaching in order to be teaching my child. Now, once a teacher has tenure, that could be a different story!

    Another point to make is that in a public school, you are taught gym by someone trained to teach gym, you are taught art and music by someone trained to do so. Most private schools don't have the funds to offer such inclusive programs. As a teacher who teachs her preschool children EVERY part of the curriculum, I know that a specialized teacher would do a better job. Am I proud of the job that I do? ABSOLUTELY! My 3 to 5-year-olds can identify their favorite authors, they know different art techniques, know how to keep a beat, and they can play lots of "no lose" gross motor games. But I understand that there's a better way.

    And while it might be good (or at least easier) to have a more homogenous group, as Elizabeth said in her post about {getting rid of "problematic" and "undesireable" kids who don't care to really learn anything by kicking them out faster than they can blink,} it angers me as a parent of a developmentally disabled child to learn that my son is not 'good enough.' In my earlier post, I stated that I had interviewed at a private Friends school. One of the things they had told me was that they administer an entry exam to every student. If they don't pass, they don't get considered for enrollment. She told me this makes it easier so they don't have any learning disabilities in the classes. She came right out and told me this like it would make me happy! And private schools do get funding when it comes to special education; they must send in their own teachers to conduct special education classes. As you can see, I have a lot to say on this! But this post is getting kind of long so I'll stop here.
     
  22. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    mmeblue, I was NOT knocking uncertified teachers. Did you go back and read all my posts?
    I have a 4 yr old and I have started looking at the private schools out there.
    I thought that if you were employed as a teacher in ANY school you had to be certified, plain and simple. I didn't say anything derogatory(SP?) about uncertified teachers. If you think I did, then point the words out to me.
    I actually made a point of saying I don't knock them because I felt posts were going that way. It makes sense to feel that way though, because it must feel frustrating to know you have gotten all the training and education to become a teacher, then know there are private schools where teachers didn't have to go through that.
    That doesn't mean those uncertified teachers aren't doing something to get certified. Who knows?

    I also expressed surprise at some of the rules I'm seeing at different schools. Not knocking those, either, just noticing the differences in what's acceptable and what's not.

    Don't get me started on tuitions!!!
     
  23. scarlet_begonia

    scarlet_begonia Comrade

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    Regarding sub income, in my area of south jersey, a lot of the districts pay $65 dollars a day. Some pay $75 or $80 and the inner city district in my area pays $120. First year teachers' salary will start at 30,000 to 38,000 depending on the district. The inner city districts start at 38,000, maybe even 40,000. The affluent districts start at around 34,000 to 37,000, and the middle income districts start closer to 30,000. The district I grew up in starts at only 29,500--the lowest I've found. It's a middle class district.
     
  24. charterteacher

    charterteacher Rookie

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    Most of these people that are teaching in private schools have been doing it for a very long time and are just as qualified as teacher's who have degrees. A college education doesn't necessarily make a better teacher. I wouldn't look at the teacher's credentials as much as I'd look at the kids who attend and the parent's who are paying. That's how you'll get the best idea of what kind of a school it is. Also, call some of the local child psychologists and speech people and ask them their opinion of the school. If it has a good or bad reputation, they'll know about it.
     
  25. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 24, 2005

    becky, if you have a problem with uncertified teachers teaching kids THEN why do you want to homeschool when you yourself aren't even certified to teach? No offense, but in light of all this I had to ask since you seem to have issues with non-certified teachers (who were, up until recently, even teaching kids in the public school system until the cat was let out of the bag).

    In addition, if you feel this is a travesty or injustice to the children when it comes to uncertified teachers teaching them in the private school setting, at least where you are, then why aren't you yourself studying education to become a certified teacher so that you can work in a private school and help change that?
     
  26. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm confused... I don't see the purpose of debating whether Becky knocked or didn't knock uncertified teachers? Travesty? Injustice? I saw none of this in her posts. She posted 3 fairly short messages where she asked about uncertified teachers and wondered how it could be that way. In fact, she even said in her first post, "They are probably no less committed or skilled..." Are her posts being mixed up with posts by others?

    She's being put on the defensive for asking a simple question. If I were her, I would hesitate before asking a question the next time around... That's not how I intended for this forum to work. Let's get back on track...
     
  27. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 25, 2005

    Yes, she DID say, "They are probably no less committed or skilled..." But, it feels, with the title of the thread, that there is a slightly condescending attitude about them even thought he posts themselves reflect otherwise.

    Scarlet_begonia wanted to know why someone wouldn't want to send their child where there are certified teachers (i.e. public schools). Again, up until recently non-certified teachers were being hired to teach in public schools until the cat was let out of the bag SO the question then becomes why were parents sending their kids to a free public school to be taught by uncertified teachers without knowing about it for the longest time?

    She goes on to say that a private school told her if kids don't pass the test they can't get in and that it angers her as a parent of a developmentally disabled child to learn that my son is not 'good enough'. I don't think that message is being conveyed to her. This is just the way private schools work. It's like a private resort in a well-to-do community. They can control who they let in and who they don't let in. Private schools all look for different individuals to be letting in based on whatever it is they're looking for. Because they don't receive federal and state funding they have that option of being selective as to who they will and will not let in. Private schoos aren't FOR EVERYONE like public schools and that's what sets them apart and makes them different.

    What struck me the most about the thread so far is that becky is very surprised at some of the different rules that she's seeing at each school and made a commenta bout a Christian school's dress code. She looks into a Christian school and is surprised at the dress code? It's a Christian school! Heck, the Baptist school I attended required girls to dress that way. To be honest, most do, as it's a Christian school and they believe in modesty and a woman being properly clothed as outlined in the Bible. I'm perplexed as to why anyone would be surprised in the different rules they see at each private school they check out. After all, these are private schools who, once again, receive no federal and no state funds and therefore can do as they please since they don't have someone 4 miles over in a district building dictating how they should be run.

    And yes, I do feel as if it's been implied that it's a travesty and an injustice to students who are taught by uncertified teachers at a private school. Maybe I feel that way since I am moreso a product of private schooling than I am of public schooling.

    And yes, you may not have intended the forum to work like this BUT it's a posting forum, and as with any posting forum, there will be times discussion in a thread will tend to move in anothe direction. I don't know of any online posting forum where discussion tends to stay on perfect on-track discussion with the posters.
     
  28. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Notice when I said I didn't intend for the forum to work that way, I was referring to someone being afraid to ask a simple question for fear they will be attacked. So when I say, "Let's get back on track," I mean stop the personal attacks and respect the rules of the forum.

    Now, let's get back on track...
     
  29. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 25, 2005

    Opps. my mistake. I thought you meant on-track discussion wise.
     
  30. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Hey Becky- good for you- You should check out what schools in your area are offering-It's always good to know what your options are. I know as a homeschool parent you probably have to keep in touch with your local schools anyway to make sure you are meeting curriculum requirements. Homeschooling isn't for everyone (neither is teaching!!) As I said in a previous post some people are just good teachers and some aren't (public, private, or homeschool....) The fact that you check out what schools are doing, engage in conversation and research regarding education online, etc shows that you are proactive, take your job as a 'teacher' seriously (let's face it PARENTS are their children's first teachers!) and that you are interested in doing the best you can for your sweetie.

    As far as private school rules go, keep in mind that these schools are catering to specific demographics- many parents who send their children to these schools want certain types of discipline, solid dress codes, etc. And as far as tuition goes, keep in mind that tuition goes for the heating, electric, buidling upkeep, AS WELL as materials, and teacher salaries (which are often far below their public school counterparts)

    As a teacher, I'm NOT frustrated knowing that there are teachers out there who are not certified while I went through the education/training/certification. I taught as a certified teacher in a private school and yes there were great teachers there who were certified and NOT certified- it didn't bother me. I personally feel well-prepared, well-versed in current educational thinking and research, and better able to apply what I know becasue of my degrees and continued professional development. In public school I am making much more money than in private because I AM certified and as I continue to earn credits above my MS,Ed I move onto new levels in the salary guide. The classes through which I earn the credits give me new ideas, strategies and activities that I can use to enrich my classroom/students. AND YES, some public schools have non-certified teachers...most of them are going through a non-traditional route toward certification as they have degrees and work experience in other areas. As far as non-certified teachers who are not on the certification route, well at least that's one good aspect of NCLB- teachers much be 'highly qualified' (which weeds out the non-certified but unfortunately also causes problems for educators with years of experience who may have a degree in math but are teaching science and have been successfully for 20 years!! Don't get me started!)

    I think you asked an interesting question and obviously it brought out a lot of strong feelings...
     
  31. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    Elizabeth you have to keep in mind I'm new at all this and I AM greatly surprised in the differences I'm finding in the rules of each school. For example, another school I looked at required only a purple shirt and khaki pants for each student that could be easily gotten at Wal-Mart.
    If I sent her to the Christian school I guess I'd have to get dresses made for her, because I can't imagine where to find hemlines that long.
    Frankly, the only school uniforms I'm familiar with are the type you see in Catholic schools, so,yes, I'm finding the differences interesting.

    Elizabeth, go back and reread post# 21. Simply put, I thought that if you taught ANYWHERE you had to be state certified, more so if tuition is being taken.
     
  32. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 25, 2005

    I guess I'm surprised someone would find it surprising to see differences in the rules for each PRIVATE school.

    But, that's just the uniqueness to PRIVATE schools and what sets them apart from their public counterparts - nothing more, nothing less. And yes, they do vary as your're finding out and they vary depending on the type of students they're looking for, the values they want to instill in their students, and the belief structure as a whole by the relkigious group or other body of individuals who govern it.

    I just did. :) But, I think that's a common misconception among people outside of the education world. Up until recently, public schools were hiring uncertified teachers because they didn't want to extend them the same kind of pay and benefits certified teachers had all for money saving measures. However, the media got wind of that and public schools were quickly finding themselves in a bit of a jam with it and had to stop hiring non-certified teachers.

    Also, it used to be where you didn't even need to be certified to teach in Catholic schools. Now, teachers have to be certified to teach at Catholic schools regardless of the archdiocese and the level they were teaching. So, now all Catholic school teachers Pre-K through higher education are certified properly. I diubt you'd find any uncertified ones working there unless they're really old teachers who were probably "grandfatehred" in as uncertified ones when the Catholic Church decided that all of it's teachers would be certified ones, no exceptions.

    You have to bare in mind that PRIVATE schools pick up uncertified teachers, in part, because it's hard to find qualified, certified ones who will teach there when they can make FAR MORE money at a public school. Hiring non-certified teachers became a way for many PRIVATE schools to survive. After all, PRIVATE school teachers make about $10 to 20,000 less a year than their public school counterparts.
     
  33. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    THAT is a large difference. I wouldn't have expected that.
     
  34. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Thanks, Amanda.
     
  35. mmeblue

    mmeblue Rookie

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    In addition to the things Elizabeth mentioned, private schools have the freedom to hire, for example, the chemistry professor who's been teaching at the college level for 20 years and wants to teach high school, but doesn't want to go through state certification requirements. I knew a professor when I was in college who decided against teaching high school simply because of the hoops she'd have to jump through; a private school could have hired her with no problem.

    My school requires its full-time teachers to have or to work toward having certification from the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI), but it does hire uncertified teachers. I do not have state certification because I moved from one state to another a week after I graduated from college - I'm a couple of forms away from being certified in Georgia, but I'm not sure where I stand as far as Florida is concerned.

    You (becky) mentioned that it was surprising to you that private schools hire uncertified teachers because of the tuition, i.e. why would parents pay that much money to have uncertified people teach their child. A different perspective to consider is this: Tuition payments make parents feel like they have some amount of power over their child's education. If they're not happy with what the school is doing, they can pull out their child and the money that comes with that child. In my experience, this leads to more accountability for the teachers - so even though there may not be certification requirements, the teachers are checked up on by parents who want to make sure their children are in a good learning environment, and by administrators who want to make sure that the school's standards of providing a good learning environment are upheld. And the school isn't tied by governmental requirements for who it can and cannot hire, so it can make the choice to hire a person who may do an excellent job but not have the paperwork to back it up.

    Because I was asked, I want to respond to a couple of things that were directed specifically to me. (Amanda, if you feel this is inappropriate, let me know and I will edit it out.) Yes, I have read all of the posts in this thread. The thing that caused me to be taken aback was the choice of words for the thread title. From my perspective, it was questioning whether the place where I work is worthy to be called a school. Within the text of the posts, there seems to be respect for uncertified teachers, but the thread title itself seemed to portray an attitude of condescension toward private schools that hire teachers without certification, and that was what I took issue with. However, the attitude that I perceived was apparently not what was intended, according to the explanations that have since been posted. While I wouldn't have chosen the wording used in the title, I accept that it wasn't meant to offend. So basically, I'm over it / no longer bothered, but I wanted to explain myself since questions were asked of me specifically.
     
  36. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Apr 25, 2005

    I have been reading this thread with a lot of interest - also trying to figure out if it is about certification or qualities of private schools. Anyway, I am one of those uncertified teachers. I fell into teaching by mistake and found that I was born to do it. At that point, though, having already gotten a master's degree in another field, I wasn't interested in going back to school or in jumping through hoops. I worked at one school while my child was there (subbing then asked to take over a class, then return next year). When I left I was highly recommended by my former principal to another private school before I even applied there. Since I am not interested in working in public schools (awful environment in this area), I am one of the most sought after teachers at my current school, I love the small-school atmosphere and philosophy (every child is an honored student), my employer supports me totally...... I have not been inspired to get certified. The downside is that I make about $20,000 less than I would in public school. So far, I have been able to make the sacrifice because I love my job, though it is very difficult.

    The benefits of my particular private school (yes, they are all different, each with its own niche) are many: classes often have fewer than 10 students, individualized attention, nurturing and safe environment (particularly for SLD and EH students), lots of control over social conditions and behavior, close relationship with parents. No children get 'lost in the shuffle' and we can focus most of our time on teaching rather than paperwork and nonsense. Ours is not a fancy school, we don't have a lot of wealthy parents, we are not affiliated with any church or philosophy, we have an awesome art curriculum, we are gentle and appeal particularly to very sensitive children. It reminds me of what home-schooling would be - in a home of 90 kids!
     
  37. Maxine

    Maxine Companion

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    Apr 25, 2005

    Hello all, I was indeed surprised by the tone in these posts. I am reassured when Amanda redirected the topic. It is very helpful to give your personal experiences to others, but venting needs to be stated, not directed by a posting. I always learn things from other teachers when I visit A to Z. I think this is the best run and easiest to use chat posting forum of any teacher web site. We need to stick together and try for understanding. maxine
     
  38. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 25, 2005

    As I said, I'm moreso a product of private education than I am of public education. And, I'd take private education anyday over public education even though there's uncertified teachers teaching in the private sector.

    Private schools really aren't that bad and have far more pluses to them in my book than public schools do. Many of the pluses have been discussed here and it is my hope that those pluses will all be weighed fairly when looking at them as a whole and when questioning the role of uncertified teachers in them.
     
  39. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Apr 25, 2005

    I'm not sure what it is, but I have noticed a difference in the children who go to private schools versus public schools. I'll say what I THINK it is though. I think the difference that I notice is that the children from private schools have better manners, in general and handle themselves better around adults. I THINK the reason for this is that manners and respect are a very HUGE part of their curriculum.
     
  40. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Guest

    Apr 25, 2005

    You hit the nail on the head Patricia Ann!

    At all of the private schools I attended manners and respect were a HUGE part of the curriculum, especially at the Baptist school I eventually went to for my high schooling. If I was out-of-place manner and respect wise, I was called on it big time just like everyone else who was out-of-place manner and respect wise. I'll never forget the principal at the Baptist school either, the look on his face wen someone was out-of-place manner and respect wise was enough to send chills down anyone's spine.
     
  41. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Apr 26, 2005

    One of my best friends attended a private school(Lutheran I believe) and she is so well composed and smart. She is much younger than I am, but we are still very close as friends because she is so smart and nice to be around. If I had young children, I would be forking out the money to send them to a private school. My own children went to the public schools and they hated what they had to endure every day.They turned out just as I wanted them to(great!), but it was a struggle dealing with all the crap in the school system.
     

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